What Slang Do You Use At Work?

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Six Fingers
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What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Six Fingers » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:55 am UTC

The other day I started thinking of weird slang i've used in some of my jobs, and I'd like to hear some from other people.

Like Hollywood Video used to do this thing called "Suncoasting", which was a way of arranging their DVDs. Employees would put one video with the cover facing outward, and then the next two with the spine facing outward...and so on, all the way down the isle. I never did figure out why they called it that, but we used to say it all the time.

Some of the Papa Murphys pizza places call the dough without topping "skins".

Safeway calls people who walk through the produce section and eat the fruit without paying for it "grazers". No joke, lol, they actually called them that in the instructional video, and I almost died laughing the first time I heard it.

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Ianto47 » Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:21 am UTC

Bus drivers in the UK call elderly people "Twirlies" This is because in the UK after the age of 65 you get a free bus pass. It's only good after 9:30am so at 9:20 onwards you get the old folks coming on the bus and asking if it's "Too early" to use the pass. "Too early" becomes "Twirlies"
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Dave_Wise » Mon Mar 29, 2010 12:15 pm UTC

slasher= a tool nobody knows the name of, but it's like a great big stick with s sharp blade at the end.
Comedy mallet= fencing maul
basher= another tool nobody knows the name of, but it's like a big cylinder closed at one end with handles that you use for ramming posts in with.
shifter= an adjustable spanner
bigger= anyone in authority, in imitation of hobbits and small fairy folk everywhere
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Bobber » Mon Mar 29, 2010 12:30 pm UTC

Dave_Wise wrote:slasher= a tool nobody knows the name of, but it's like a great big stick with a sharp blade at the end.
Scythe? Halberd?
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Grop
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Grop » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:06 pm UTC

Hast weapon ? Also, do you slash people at work?

Edit: a bill hook indeed.
Last edited by Grop on Mon Mar 29, 2010 2:19 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Dave_Wise » Mon Mar 29, 2010 1:24 pm UTC

It could probably be used as a weapon, but no. It's used for clearing scrub. We're too cheap for brushcutters, and in any case they're probably at least against the spirit of the conservation scheme in place on the properties. It's not a scythe, because a scythe blade is wider, curved and set at a 90 degree angle to the handle, held on by a few catch thingies. I occasionally use a scythe for removing bracken. It's not a halberd either, because a halberd blade is kind of axelike. The weapon it most resembles is a japanese naginata, but the curve is different.
I regularly use all sorts of equipment that closely resemble weapons. The billhook I use for snedding small trees and light path maintenance looks like a scimitar. I have any number of axes, and a large number of knives. They are all used for exclusively peaceful purposes, with the exception of the .22 caliber rifle, which is peaceful to anybody except rabbits.
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby jinzougen » Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:18 am UTC

Six Fingers wrote:The other day I started thinking of weird slang i've used in some of my jobs, and I'd like to hear some from other people.

Like Hollywood Video used to do this thing called "Suncoasting", which was a way of arranging their DVDs. Employees would put one video with the cover facing outward, and then the next two with the spine facing outward...and so on, all the way down the isle. I never did figure out why they called it that, but we used to say it all the time.

Some of the Papa Murphys pizza places call the dough without topping "skins".

Safeway calls people who walk through the produce section and eat the fruit without paying for it "grazers". No joke, lol, they actually called them that in the instructional video, and I almost died laughing the first time I heard it.


Suncoast is/was a chain of video stores, there used to be one at the local mall. They probably called it that because the specific method of arranging the videos on the shelf was borrowed from Suncoast. While googling Suncoast trying to find a link, I realize that they have either changed their name or have been bought out by F.Y.E.
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby firechicago » Tue Mar 30, 2010 4:49 pm UTC

From my days working for a college theater:

The things that emit the radiation that makes the actors visible are called "instruments" or occasionally "lighting instruments." "Light" is a term reserved exclusively for the radiation that comes out of the business end. This seems really pretentious until you waste 15 minutes because every time the director uses the words interchangeably you have to stop and ask him what he means.

Also the little bits of wire and glass that actually make the light? Those are "lamps" never "bulbs." This one I never did figure out the reason for.

And this one I think is unique to techies at the University Theater at the University of Chicago:

We always talked about tools, set pieces or any other inanimate object as if they had agency and we were just facilitating their desires, as in:

"I think this set piece wants to be a couple inches upstage to give the actors more room to maneuver."

or:

"I think the instruments on channels 5,7 and 23 want to be a touch brighter."

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Mighty Jalapeno » Tue Mar 30, 2010 4:53 pm UTC

Dick-Hard = means that the poured concrete has cured enough to walk on.

...

Really, all of the slang in my industry is pretty vulgar. THAT'S the most PG-13 one I can think of.

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Dave_Wise » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:21 pm UTC

Oh, vulgar slang? The slang used in kitchens is often unbelievably obscene. I refer you to the chapter in Anthony Bourdain's 'Kitchen confidential' entitled 'the level of discourse'.
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby extrablue » Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:40 pm UTC

OT not slang but an awesome phrase


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Dave_Wise
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Dave_Wise » Wed Apr 07, 2010 12:07 pm UTC

We always talked about tools, set pieces or any other inanimate object as if they had agency and we were just facilitating their desires, as in:

"I think this set piece wants to be a couple inches upstage to give the actors more room to maneuver."

or:

"I think the instruments on channels 5,7 and 23 want to be a touch brighter."

That's almost universally the case amongst mechanics and other low-level technical staff. Engineers, but not in the sense of 'I went to university and studied engineering and now I have the most fantastic job you can imagine'. In the sense of 'I spend all day in various dark dungeons, keeping the entire military industrial complex in operation with nothing more than an adjustable spanner, a copper/rawhide mallet, a screwdriver and a grim determination and stoicism that's actually passed down from father to son".
The future is always bright. Bombs generate quite substantial amounts of illumination
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Woopate » Sat Apr 10, 2010 12:49 pm UTC

In radio usage, you are "stepped on" when you start transmitting a message, and somebody interrupts with a transmission of their own, rendering your transmission indecipherable. A person who is "stepped on" has to be told that they were stepped on, and to repeat the message, because they cannot hear the other guy transmitting, nor can they hear what they sound like.

Also, I made styrofoam blocks for a while, and we called the rods that pushed the styrofoam blocks out of their moulds "plungers", while their proper designation is ejector rod.

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Daniswownerd » Fri May 21, 2010 9:11 pm UTC

We use "walked on" for the radio interruptions. I guess that would be the same thing. My personal favorite is the catchall "thingie" usually accompanied by a point at whatever the person wants.

"Tail" is used to refer to a plane. I think this is because the identification number is displayed on the tail. I have never actually bothered to confirm this though.
Also, I am guessing that those half-can's that are almost D-shaped are called "demies"(not sure on the spelling) because they are half of a contour but I never asked for sure.
Great! Now, I'm all self-conscious about my slang. I don't even understand most of it. At least I know what it refers to though! :D :roll:

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby eekmeep » Sun Jun 20, 2010 6:53 am UTC

slang:

suspense = deadline

bird = airplane

acronyms:

mfr = memo for record

jitt = just-in-time training

ojt = on-the-job training

nlt = no later than

cob = close of business


I have no idea if these are common elsewhere or not.

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Lioness » Sun Jun 20, 2010 8:47 am UTC

I work in a deli, and we tend to abbreviate names of product in order to confuse customers entirely.

"Hey, X, can you grab a a box of bananas out of the freezer?" refers to banana prawns.
"Barramundi" gets shortened to "barra"
"How many boxes should we cook?" refers to boxes of chickens.
We also often refer to products by their numerical code: "Which olives are they?" "2140" "thanks" (Pitted kalamata, if you were wondering)

Then there's just my own bit of madness...I once went through all of the codes, seeing if any of them matched relative atomic masses for any of the elements. Unfortunately, none of them did :(

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby orinjuse » Mon Jun 21, 2010 2:32 am UTC

I used to work as a cameraman and editor, so we had all the usual video slang. At the start of the night I'd put my camera on my sticks, wire in and tell my director that number two was on cans, could he please give me a balance and I'd flip to ND2 and fix the zebra.

Now I'm a magazine journalist, so it's all the standard stuff for that. I'll lug all my glass to an interview, get my frame and a grab, come home and write up a DPS with a nice hook, and then send my bag to the design guys with instructions to throw in a box with it, they'll mark it on their dummy, then I might have a fiddle with my standfirst.
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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Chrishy » Sat Jul 17, 2010 7:12 am UTC

I work at Food Lion as a bagger in Southern Virginia. (Food Lion is a grocery store on the East coast.)
  • Shopping carts:. There is a singular "buggy" which you get for a customer, etc, but there are the plural "carts". I am the only employee who uses "cart". (I refuse to "Southernize".) No one says "buggies." Ever. I have absolutely NO clue why.
  • The kiosk is between registers 5 and 6, and refers to the area where cigarettes and other 18+ things are kept.
  • to bag -- to place purchased groceries in plastic (or paper or reusable) bags for the customer to carry to his or her vehicle via the "buggy" (cart).
  • Dry Sunday is the day that no one is allowed to purchase alcohol but everyone tries.
  • The lot is simply the parking lot.
  • To run the machine means to use a floor buffing machine to scrub the floors. It never refers to the other machines that are used. The process involves going up and down every aisle.
  • A pick-up is when too much cash (20s and 100s) is in the register's till and it needs to be taken to the safe.
  • Reclaim -- where damaged/unsellable goods go. I have no clue if vendors actually come retrieve them.
  • To walk the store means to take nonperishable products customers returned or didn't want at check out in a "buggy" (cart!) and walk up and down every aisle, replacing said items while also making displays look nice, fixing products on the shelves, and taking damaged goods to reclaim.
  • An MVP card is our promotional store discount card which a customer is SUPPOSED to have to get the discount, but said person doesn't actually need it because cashiers put in their own card so they don't get customer complaints. There are no "rewards points" or anything else, so it really doesn't matter. (Not really slang, but an annoyance)
  • The Office -- where managers and office workers mysteriously disappear to during the day. Has access to the safe. Other employees only enter for training, cleaning, and, primarily, punishment.
Bagger -- formal title "service associate" -- an employee who sometimes bags groceries to speed up the purchase process, but primarily retrieves carts off the lot, cleans the kiosk and the bathrooms, returns beer to the shelves on Dry Sunday, runs the machine, gets spare MVP cards, and tells office workers when cashiers need a pick-up, all while walking the store in his free time.

This was fun. (and fyi, that isn't my ENTIRE job description. I left out cleaning spills, stocking bread, etc. I have a busy job.)

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby Fado » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:18 am UTC

I used to work as a sound engineer. Can only think of a few bits and pieces of slang that we used though.

  • "Zero the desk": to reset all the parameters on the desk back to zero.
  • "snake": multicore, although this is more commonly used in the States.
  • "front of house": the sound desk, ironically usually positioned at the back.
  • "DFA button": the "does f**k all button*, the imaginary button we pretend to push when the artist is asking for something stupid or impossible, along the lines of, "Can I have a bit more blue in that, please?" Nine times out of ten, they'll look pensive for a moment as they listen to the unaltered sound before smiling and saying, "Yeah, that's much better."

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby onebeeandrevery » Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:36 pm UTC

Right, so medical terminology is almost entirely about deciphering the jargon for whatever kind of unit which employs you. My first two degrees are in English literature and Linguistics, so when I went back for nursing, this was the most fun part, at first. It remains fun, but I really HATE all the acronyms in charts, and some doctors like to make up their own for orders, which can get confusing/dangerous.

"walky talky" is a patient who can - you guessed it - walk and talk

there are tons of stupid Latin-based abbreviations for how often to take medications, and I'll let you look up the Latin words: ac (before eating), prn (as needed), bid (twice a day), tid (three times a day), qid (four times a day), qd (daily), qod (every other day), hs (at dinner), po (by mouth), pr (by rectum), pc (after meals, pv (by vagina), etc.

"Sniff" or "SNF" as it's abbreviated, means "skilled nursing facility," or what is commonly referred to as a "nursing home"

afib, vfib, PVCs, vtach, etc. are abbreviations for various cardiac arrhythmias. I suspect most people know what "flatline" means. Probably "DOA," too.

"CBC" is a complete blood count, which includes WBC (white blood count) , RBC (red blood count), ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), H &H (hematocrit, or just "crit" and hemoglobin), and anything else requested.

"code brown" is when someone has pooped themselves. You can win the "brown star" in nursing school by being the person most often cleaning up poop. Yeah, I got that. So proud. :mrgreen:

PMH: past medical history

FH: family history

PT/OT/ST/RT: physical therapy/occupational therapy/speech therapy/respiratory therapy

DVT: deep vein thrombosis, or a clot.

"on contact" means the patient has contact precautions in place. Can also have "droplets" or "neutropenic" precautions.

"CVA" is a cerebrovascular accident, more commonly called a "stroke."

"foley" or "cath" for a foley catheter. 14 Fr.

"1000 ml D5 + K" = a maintenance IV fluid drip with added potassium

LFT is a liver function test

MI is a "myocardial infarction" or a heart attack.

MVA is a "motor vehicle accident"

NG/OG tubes - naso or orogastric tubes.

NSAID is a nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug, like ibuprofen.

APAP is acetaminophen, or Tylenol.

"desatting" is when someone's oxygen saturation level decrease in response to a stressor. This is interesting to watch in crying babies, especially!

ptt is partial prothrombin time, a measure of blood clotting time used for heparin dosing

PERRLA is the abbreviation for "pupils equally round and reactive in light and accommodation." This just means you don't have a concussion or brain tumor.

LP is a lumbar puncture.

STAT = ASAP

So, I'm in orthopaedics, and we get back surgeries/injuries abbreviated by the procedure and/or location: for example, a TLIF is a "total lumbar internal fixation". T3 is the 3rd thoracic vertebra, L1 is the first lumbar, C5 would be the 5th cervical (neck).

If someone is "tachy" or "brady" it is in reference to their heart rate.

And WNL is "within normal limits." WTF is "WNL" anyway?!?

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Re: What Slang Do You Use At Work?

Postby dpjohnston » Wed Aug 11, 2010 2:03 pm UTC

Me and my colleagues at the bank used to refer to shares that spiked in value as a Ferret after the Reuters small cap mining journalist who must have retired by now and living on a tropical island if he practiced what he preached.. so a stock that rises quickly = FERRET


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