Local Colloquialisms

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KestrelLowing
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Local Colloquialisms

Postby KestrelLowing » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:26 pm UTC

This is something I've always been fascinated with, and if I was going into the social sciences, I would probably study how the various colloquial words/phrases started (if possible!).

So, I thought it would be interesting to see the various colloquialisms that occur in various places around the world (For example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sodavspopvscoke.png)

I guess I'll start. I'm originally from near Detroit, MI, I'm currently going to school in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, I worked in Rockford, Illinois recently, and I'm working in Northeast Wisconsin right now. Here's some I've run into/use

  • Pop - soft drink (of course!)
  • Yooper - person who lives in the upper peninsula (the UP)
  • Davenport - couch (mostly older people)
  • Bubbler - drinking fountain (WI)
  • Water fountain - drinking fountain (I find this to be completely natural, but some people who use 'bubbler' find this weird)
  • The adding of 's onto the end of places (We're going to Meijer's after school.) even if it isn't in the name
  • Ending sentences in unnecessary prepositions occasionally (Where's my backpack at?)
  • Using the phrase 'come with' without anything after it (Are you gonna come with? - This seems to be from MN. I have to have the 'me' or 'us' at the end.)

That's all I can really think of right now. So what's different in your area?

EDIT: Just realized most of you won't know what Meijer is. It a supermarket, much like walmart, but not evil. It's pretty much the best store ever and it's found mostly in Michigan. I guess we treat store names like they were family houses. (We're going over to the Smith's tonight.) However, "Walmart's" sounds ridiculous as does "Save-a-lot's". "Barnes & Nobel's" sounds perfectly fine.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby IcedT » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:53 pm UTC

I recently moved from Phoenix to Houston, and the only real difference I've noticed is that out here, people say "bruh" and "mayn."

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Rilian » Tue Jul 13, 2010 11:30 pm UTC

IcedT wrote:I recently moved from Phoenix to Houston, and the only real difference I've noticed is that out here, people say "bruh" and "mayn."

What are those supposed to mean?
And I'm -2.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby webby » Tue Jul 13, 2010 11:45 pm UTC

As an Australian, there are more of these than I can list... But I'll just stick to the ones we (the people I talk to) actually use = the ones like 'G'day mate' and 'strewth' and 'crikey' are far more from country Australia and the older generation. I have no idea how many of these are actually Australian.

arvo = afternoon
barbie = BBQ
billabong = a type of lake - can't remember exact definition.
bloke = man/guy
blue = fight/argument
boogie board = smaller surfboard, often used by children in shallow water (they lie facedown on the board and ride the waves to the beach).
bottle-o = place to buy alcohol
chuck a sickie = take the day off when you're healthy
daks = trousers (also 'to dak', pull someone's pants down as a joke - popular amongst 14 year olds)
esky = an insulated container usually used to carry beer, but maybe also food.
footy = Aussie rules (in Victoria) or Rugby League (in NSW)
going off = a pub/club/party which is wild/lots of fun
hotel = sometimes just a pub
no worries (mate) = it's ok/I forgive you
pashing = making out
skull = drinking (usually a beer) quickly, without pausing
Vinnies = St Vincent de Pauls - charity shop which sells cheap stuff people have donated
XXXX = Four X, a type of beer usually drunk in Queensland

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Joeldi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 3:35 am UTC

webby wrote:blue = fight/argument
boogie board = smaller surfboard, often used by children in shallow water (they lie facedown on the board and ride the waves to the beach).


I'm from regional queensland, and I don't ever hear 'blue'.
Boogie Boards are more properly called body boards, and used for body-boarding *nods*.

Other things I'd add is the shortening of proper names for well known franchises or popular places.
Woolies = Woolworths supermarket (can also be the shopping centre that the supermarket is)
Big Dub = Big W, a department store controlled by Woolworths
Maccas = obvious
Hungries = Hungry Jack's (same as Burger King but with a different name for some reason)
Red Rooter = Red Rooster (Fast food shop that sells mainly chicken. Slightly better quality than KFC)

-Not gonna go through the list of nicknames that you'll find all over the net, usually ending in -y,-o or -zz(a)

We've picked up heaps of slang from American television though, including things from OP's list ('Come with', 'where's my phone at', and stuff like 'sup', 'bro/brah' 'man' etc. Hopefully I'll think of some more things specific to regional queensland.
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Promac » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:09 am UTC

I'm from Derry in Northern Ireland - here's a couple of ours.

Aye/Naw = Yes/No.

Hi = You. Also added to the end of sentences the way americans add "man" or "bro".
Yes = Hello.
What about ye = How are you.
Aright = How are you.
Wil' (means Wild, pronounced "while") = Very: "It's wil' good of you to help that old woman across the road".
Wil' (Wild) = Bad. "That's wil' hi"
Cat - Bad. "That's cat, hi" = "that's bad"
Grand/Gran'. = Good.
Sound = Good or Thanks or (you're) Generous.
Dead on = Sound.
Don't talk = I agree, continue talking.
Wayns = Children. Comes from a contraction of "Wee ones" but now has its own spelling.
Fag = cigarette (same as in UK)
Skint = broke.
Windie = window. More pronunciation than slang but it leads to the hilarious, if very insensitive, term windie-lickers - meaning "the mentally handicapped".


A lot of these can be demonstrated in the following typical exchange:

>Yes, Hi, what about ye? Aright?
-Naw, hi, havin' a wil' day.
>Aw, that's cat, hi.
-Aye, tell me about it.
>Aw, don't talk hi. Have ye any fags?
-Aye no bother.
>Dead on hi, I'm skint.
-How's the wayns?
>Aye, grand hi.
-Sound.


Edit: Some more I've remembered.

Poke = Ice cream in a cone. Probably from the shape.
Mingin, Boggin = very dirty.
Bake = face.
Mind = remember. "Do ye mind the time I..." = "Do you remember the time I ..."
"Your bake's mingin, hi. Go and wash it and I'll buy ye a poke."

We also tend to contract as much as possible as well and speak as quickly as possible. Any phrases with a verb+"to" are shortened with the verb having a "y" added: need to = needy, want to = wanty (itself contracted by not pronouncing the "t", "wan'y") etc.

The phrase "to the" is generally shortened to "da". "Do you" becomes "d'ye" ("ye" being the old form of "you" obviously and still used in Ireland).

"Do you want to go to the bar?" = "D'ye wany go da bar?"

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby IcedT » Thu Jul 15, 2010 3:26 am UTC

Rilian wrote:
IcedT wrote:I recently moved from Phoenix to Houston, and the only real difference I've noticed is that out here, people say "bruh" and "mayn."

What are those supposed to mean?
Local version of 'bro' and 'man' (say em out loud).

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby mmmcannibalism » Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:18 pm UTC

Ya'll which is either you or all of you depending on context

I also think there is a difference on whether yes is abbreviated as yeah or yaw(in pronunciation).
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby RabbitWho » Thu Jul 15, 2010 10:22 pm UTC

There are big fat dictionaries published on Cork slang, but I'll do the best off the top of my head.

The origin of a lot of these is in old English, sometimes Irish, sometimes Shelta (language of Travelers) .


Bjor = girl
feen = boy
langer = penis / unpleasant or foolish individual
Langered/locked/moylow = drunk
bate = hit/ beat. Regular verb (to bate / bated / bated / Baten)
yer wan = that woman (your one)
yer man = that man (your man)
Flah = noun; 1. an attractive person who you would like to engage in sexual intercourse. 2. the act of sexual intercourse 3. verb; to engage in sexual intercourse.
Leg it = to run away from something. I thought this was a Cork thing but much to my surprise it turned up in a Clockwise ESL book published by Oxford!
Sketch = an exclamation similar to "I say, look out chaps!" used when one is engaged in some forbidden activity and an authority figure is sighted.
gee/fanny = vagina
queer hawk = unusual or strange individual
sound = adjective for an upstanding person
skant / skanty = mean (unkind)
manky = dirty
Sham = a person (In other parts of Ireland this refers to Travelers, I think it was a shelta word for people, you always get that in languages. "Who are you? Us... uhh... We're people... "People"! the north is the land of the "people" tribe!" )

Here's a pretty extensive glossary including etymology: http://www.corkslang.com/a.htm

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby GarrettIrish » Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:44 am UTC

I grew up in East Tennessee around the Knoxville area. I've since spent some time in MD but I'll see what I can remember from my East Tennessee dialect.

Coke - used for all soda's regardless of brand. Common because the first Coke factory was actually in Knoxville( I remember passing it as a kid )
Ridge - between a hill and a mountain. Not sure how widely this is used but in Tennessee most people roughly agree on the size of what is a ridge, as opposed to a mountain or a hill.
Wrecker - tow truck. Really common, best friend's dad used to own the Clinton Highway Wrecker Service.
"Out West" - Refers to the built up touristy areas around Pigeon Forge serving the Smoky Mountains National Park. Ironically to the east.

Most of it isn't colloquialisms as much as pronunciation down there though. East Tennessee is a weird mix of a general Southern dialect with the thicker Appalachian dialects.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby KestrelLowing » Fri Jul 16, 2010 12:19 pm UTC

GarrettIrish wrote:I grew up in East Tennessee around the Knoxville area. I've since spent some time in MD but I'll see what I can remember from my East Tennessee dialect.

Coke - used for all soda's regardless of brand. Common because the first Coke factory was actually in Knoxville( I remember passing it as a kid )
Ridge - between a hill and a mountain. Not sure how widely this is used but in Tennessee most people roughly agree on the size of what is a ridge, as opposed to a mountain or a hill.
Wrecker - tow truck. Really common, best friend's dad used to own the Clinton Highway Wrecker Service.
"Out West" - Refers to the built up touristy areas around Pigeon Forge serving the Smoky Mountains National Park. Ironically to the east.

Most of it isn't colloquialisms as much as pronunciation down there though. East Tennessee is a weird mix of a general Southern dialect with the thicker Appalachian dialects.


Interesting, for me a ridge has always been a particularly long hill/mountain. Basically, it’s a hill that has a fairly long area at the top. I've often hiked on ridges, and you really just have the path, and then it slopes down on either side of you. Typically the top needs to be fairly narrow the other way to be considered a ridge.

In Michigan, "Up North" is anything really north of Flint, depending on who you talk to. It's the favorite vacation place of just about everyone in Michigan - cheap and pretty. Of course that leads to "fudgies", people who go up north (specifically Mackinac Island - pronounced Mac-in-aw) as tourists. This comes from the fact that Mackinac Island and Mackinaw City are fairly famous for their fudge. (Yes, they're spelled differently, but pronounced the same)

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:11 pm UTC

Heaps to mean "very". That's heaps good, ay?
Stubby to mean a short beer bottle, and longneck to mean a tall one.
Budgie smugglers for Speedos.
That's all I have, really. But one I love is the completely contextually dependent, "Yeah, nah". It can mean you don't agree, and it can mean you do agree.

KestrelLowing wrote:"Walmart's" sounds ridiculous

Does it? I can see it as short for "Wallmart's shop". Seems similar to "McDonald's restaurant" to me.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Rilian » Sun Jul 18, 2010 9:29 pm UTC

IcedT wrote:
Rilian wrote:
IcedT wrote:I recently moved from Phoenix to Houston, and the only real difference I've noticed is that out here, people say "bruh" and "mayn."

What are those supposed to mean?
Local version of 'bro' and 'man' (say em out loud).

Yeah, I did say them aloud and that didn't help. Anyway, thanks for translating.
And I'm -2.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby graatz » Mon Jul 19, 2010 3:59 pm UTC

Not from my region, but my friend from San Francisco picked up hella, an adverb that basically means very. Example: That non-dairy vegan frozen yogurt wasn't just good, it was hella good.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Joeldi » Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:17 am UTC

graatz wrote:hella

I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think that originated on South Park and got picked up through memetics.
I already have a hate thread. Necromancy > redundancy here, so post there.

roc314 wrote:America is a police state that communicates in txt speak...

"i hav teh dissentors brb""¡This cheese is burning me! u pwnd them bff""thx ur cool 2"

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:25 am UTC

Joeldi wrote:
graatz wrote:hella

I'm not 100% sure about this, but I think that originated on South Park and got picked up through memetics.

It would be highly unlikely for a TV show to originate such a colloquialism, and apparently it was being studied as early as 1993, and therefore emerged well before South Park existed. But, yes, it may have been that show which introduced it to Australian audiences.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby meatyochre » Tue Jul 20, 2010 3:31 am UTC

My mom is from West Virginia. When I was growing up she would occasionally say I was "lazier than a wagon dog."
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby caligeekchic » Tue Jul 20, 2010 4:12 am UTC

I was raised is the deep south and my friends from other areas always trip out when I say "fit to be tied" as in "I was so mad at him for crashing my computer I was fit to be tied" From what I understand (have been told) it comes from way back. If you have a particularly good dog and he starts to act mean and you suspect him being rabid and you don't want to put him down he was "fit to be tied". Leave him tied up and not able to hurt anyone and see if he develops rabies at which point you did your duty so to speak. There is also slow as molasses in winter. And what my father loved to say when he got angry "Jesus Mary and Joseph!" and "saints preserve us" which looking back was kinda weird since he wasn't the slightest bit religious... :roll:

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Jul 20, 2010 4:22 am UTC

The religious ones strike me as more Catholic than Southern (Baptist). And fit to be tied isn't a Southernism, as I definitely know what it means and I'm from Michigan. I always heard "slow as molasses in January", which is rather odd considering it can go 35mph, even up here where winter is actually cold.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:15 am UTC

Oh, that reminds me of one I heard from an American which I thought was brilliant. "It's half-way to Sunday, [so I'll be nice/won't hit you on the head/etc.]." I liked it just because you couldn't really use it before Thursday, and it means that because church-day is approaching you're more mindful not to do anything sinful.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:34 am UTC

I've only ever heard that as meaning "to a great extent", especially as in, "I kicked his ass halfway to Sunday."

Edit: Also, I think "fit to be tied" has nothing to do with dogs.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:39 am UTC

Hmm, okay, well that was her usage and that's how she explained it to me when I queried it. But a quick Google search doesn't support me, so maybe it was just how she or her immediate family used it.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Jul 20, 2010 5:47 am UTC

"N ways to/from Sunday" seems to have a similar meaning, for various N from four to eight.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby caligeekchic » Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:07 am UTC

gmalivuk wrote: And fit to be tied isn't a Southernism, as I definitely know what it means and I'm from Michigan. .
I wasn't saying it was southern just that my friends from other places (New york, Ohio, California, Arizona) had never heard it before. And 35 miles an hour gee whiz who knew? I love random trivia.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby KestrelLowing » Tue Jul 20, 2010 12:25 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:The religious ones strike me as more Catholic than Southern (Baptist). And fit to be tied isn't a Southernism, as I definitely know what it means and I'm from Michigan. I always heard "slow as molasses in January", which is rather odd considering it can go 35mph, even up here where winter is actually cold.


Yay for another Michiganian or Michigander or whatever we're calling ourselves these days! However, Molasses doesn't move in the winter. I don't know what part of Michigan you're from, but in the UP, it just doesn't move until you take a spoon to it. Making gingerbread can sometimes be a bit interesting.

I also know what fit to be tied means, but I've always view it as more of a rural expression than a southern one.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Lazar » Wed Jul 21, 2010 10:41 am UTC

Some Massachusetts items:

bubbler - drinking fountain
all set - okay, all right; "Will there be anything else?" "No, I'm all set."
package store, packie - liquor store
Mass - the short name of the state; "I go to school in Worcester, Mass."
tonic - soft drink (an older usage; nowadays most of us call it soda)
mum - used by some locals instead of mom
staties - the state police
frappe - a milkshake made with ice cream (pronounced "frap")
wicked - an intensifying adverb; "The movie was wicked awesome!"
take and - a filler phrase mostly used by older folks; "First you take and turn it on, and then..."

One interesting usage that I've noted among my peers is "legit" as an adverb. For example, "He legit told me that!" "He legit ran out of the room!" I haven't seen much written attestation of it, and I don't know how localized it is, but it's pretty common in my area.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Alces » Thu Jul 22, 2010 8:06 pm UTC

Some Liverpool slang:

made up - happy
lad - a term of address, equivalent of 'mate' or 'man' or 'guy'. Fairly gender-neutral; 'lass' isn't used.
lid, lah - bizarre alterations of 'lad', with the same meaning, as far as I can tell
sound - good, cool, etc.
to geg in - to comment in a conversation when the other people weren't aware you were listening
the bizzies - the police
sly - wrong, mean, out of order
arlarse - same as above
on your bill - alone (from 'Billy No-Mates')
keks - trousers, and thus:
to dekek - to pull someone's trousers down.
get - an idiot (don't know how widespread that one is, it's probably not just Liverpool)

There's probably lots more that I haven't realised is non-standard.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby caligeekchic » Fri Jul 23, 2010 3:28 am UTC

I think it is spelled git. My family and a few friends of mine adopted that after watching trainspotting. Now when one of us is being pigheaded we say to them "you bloody git! whut the fuck you thinking?" I love Begbie.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby IcedT » Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:24 am UTC

Lazar wrote:One interesting usage that I've noted among my peers is "legit" as an adverb. For example, "He legit told me that!" "He legit ran out of the room!" I haven't seen much written attestation of it, and I don't know how localized it is, but it's pretty common in my area.
I've heard "legit" a lot as an adjective ("Yo that was LEGIT!", or as in the song, "2 Legit 2 Quit"), mostly in bboy or other hiphop circles, but never as an adverb. I seriously have no idea how it came to be used as an adverb, unless it was an independent development.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Jul 23, 2010 4:50 am UTC

Why would it have been an independent development? Couldn't it have simply been as a result of people, even people with poor enough taste to think "legit" as an adjective is okay, thinking "legitly" just sounds really damn stupid?
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby RabbitWho » Fri Jul 23, 2010 2:02 pm UTC

I think what I find interesting was that maybe an adverb has been formed out of an adjective which was originally formed out of an adverb which was originally formed out of an adjective.
Legitimate > Legitimately
^
> Legit > Legit

That's such a cool little journey.

I think it counts as an independent development because obviously a decision was made at some point not to just say "Legitimately" . I don't think the fact that they made the same decision in different places disqualifies it from being independent. Now if some guy on tv decided and everyone took his word as law then it wouldn't be independent.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Lazar » Fri Jul 23, 2010 2:05 pm UTC

I think what I find interesting was that maybe an adverb has been formed out of an adjective which was originally formed out of an adverb which was originally formed out of an adjective.

No, I think it's just an adverb coming from an adjective which comes from another adjective. I don't think "legitimately" ever played a significant role.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby IcedT » Sat Jul 24, 2010 4:24 am UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Why would it have been an independent development? Couldn't it have simply been as a result of people, even people with poor enough taste to think "legit" as an adjective is okay, thinking "legitly" just sounds really damn stupid?
Taste is subjective my friend, especially with regards to language. And I suspected it was an independent development because I don't know of many cases of AAE terms being adopted en masse by rural midwesterners, and even if they did the shift from adjective to adverb would have had to have been an original, local usage.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Sat Jul 24, 2010 5:18 am UTC

IcedT wrote:And I suspected it was an independent development because I don't know of many cases of AAE terms being adopted en masse by rural midwesterners, and even if they did the shift from adjective to adverb would have had to have been an original, local usage.
1) There are tons of cases of AAVE slang being adopted by lame white kids because they think black slang is edgy. And it's not like MC Hammer was particularly unknown about rural midwesterners.
2) There wasn't a shift from adjective to adverb, there was an extension, possibly followed by a decline in popularity of the original adjective form. (Though even that I doubt. More likely, I think, is that you just find the adjective use too unremarkable to remark on, even if it's no less popular than previously.)
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Sat Jul 24, 2010 5:25 pm UTC

There aren't all common or inclusive, but I'll include where I've heard it for reference.

Implied prepositions, Kent England. As in "Let's go Bromley" in lieu of "Let's go to Bromley"

Simultaneous use of that and dat, northeast Florida. As in "Take this from that and put it in dat."

Ya'll're, northeast Florida. Double contraction for "you all are"

Shut/close the lights, many places. Meaning to turn the lights off.

"don't <verb> no" actually taken as a positive, Upstate NY, in an IT university.

Go to collage/university, college in U.S., university in U.K. Both terms have the same definitions in both places.

"Knocked up", pregnant in U.S. , "woken via knocking" in Australia and (in English) France. This causes much real life vaudeville.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby IcedT » Sat Jul 24, 2010 9:21 pm UTC

So I realized that when I read "Massachussets" I thought "Michigan." Now that I've cleared that up the whole 'legit' thing seems to make a lot more sense.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Sun Jul 25, 2010 4:07 am UTC

IcedT wrote:So I realized that when I read "Massachussets" I thought "Michigan."
Still doesn't explain why you thought rural.

In any case, I have heard people say "legitly" as the adverb form of the adjective "legit", which is further evidence that at least in some of the cases, "legit" as an adverb comes directly from its use as an adjective, rather than independently.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby RabbitWho » Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:57 am UTC

Do you ever say "I amn't" instead of "I'm not"? I'd like to know how common that is.

Today on Grandma's House Simon Amstell said in response to something like "This is great!"
"What, us sat in the car?" Instead of "What, us sitting in the car?" and that was interesting. Certainly an English thing?

And recently my mom said (about grass) "When we went away there was a lot grew"
When I ran to get a pen and write it down she realized something must be odd and tried to correct it by saying "When we were gone away there was a lot grew."
Anyone else say these things?

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Iulus Cofield » Tue Aug 17, 2010 8:09 am UTC

Sounds like English grammar is falling apart in those individuals, or at least simplifying radically.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Tue Aug 17, 2010 8:17 am UTC

Iulus Cofield wrote:Sounds like English grammar is falling apart in those individuals, or at least simplifying radically.

Grammatical structure is there, it's just unconventional.
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