Local Colloquialisms

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gmalivuk
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:32 pm UTC

RabbitWho wrote:"What, us sat in the car?" Instead of "What, us sitting in the car?" and that was interesting. Certainly an English thing?
Sounds like "sit" is being interpreted transitively, so like someone else sat us down in the car. If you replace it with other, more conventional transitive verbs, it doesn't sound wrong to me: "What's great? Us driven around in a car?"

And recently my mom said (about grass) "When we went away there was a lot grew"
When I ran to get a pen and write it down she realized something must be odd and tried to correct it by saying "When we were gone away there was a lot grew."
At first, this just sounds like an elided "that", but her change is more difficult to explain.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:44 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:but her change is more difficult to explain.

Not surprising considering it was a contrived statement.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Slavaa » Tue Aug 17, 2010 9:48 pm UTC

In the eastern Canadian province of Prince Edward Island...

The term "Out West" can mean either Alberta or the eastern tip of the island.
A "Corker" is a really hot day. Sometimes "A corker of a day"
"Boomer" is the weatherman. Not a weatherman, the weatherman. It's not really a colloquialism, but he's locally famous and gets an honourable mention. He probably coined local use of the word "corker".
In most of eastern Canada, the word "slippy" is frequently used instead of "slippery".

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby duckshirt » Tue Aug 17, 2010 10:20 pm UTC

RabbitWho wrote:Do you ever say "I amn't" instead of "I'm not"? I'd like to know how common that is.

How is that one pronounced?
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby tastelikecoke » Wed Aug 18, 2010 7:41 am UTC

We have colloquialisms, but in a different language. Geh, Even this topic is local.

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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby mxyzptlk » Mon Aug 23, 2010 6:48 pm UTC


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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Lazar » Sun May 29, 2016 8:01 pm UTC

I'm usually pretty well versed in British usage, but one Britticism that's only recently come to my attention is "anything/nothing like as [adj.]". I noticed it while watching movie reviews by Mark Kermode, who will often say that "Movie X is nothing like as good as Movie Y", or "Movie Z isn't anything like as scary as it should be". And since then I've noticed it from other Brits as well. My usage would be to say "(not) nearly as [adj.]".
Last edited by Lazar on Sun May 29, 2016 8:03 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby flicky1991 » Sun May 29, 2016 8:03 pm UTC

"Nothing like" is familiar to me, but I'd be more likely to use "nowhere near" myself.
any pronouns
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Sun May 29, 2016 9:11 pm UTC

In American English, "nowhere near as" and "not nearly as" are together about 35x as common as "nothing like as" and "anything like as.

In British English, the ratio is more like 4:1.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Lazar » Tue May 31, 2016 2:07 pm UTC

Other observation: it seems to me that the domain of "because" has expanded so that it can be used not only in answer to "why" questions, but also in answer to "how" questions for which the more prescriptively correct response would be "in that". For example, if somebody asks me "How is that interesting?", I'll reply "It's interesting because…". In cases like this, "in that" just seems too stilted for conversational use.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Tue May 31, 2016 2:44 pm UTC

I would have guessed that the etymology of "because" was a shortening of a version of "the cause being", and it turns out it's form "by cause". Which makes a perfect fit for how questions.

My impression (as in, I don't have citations) on the classical response to a "why" question is "For ..." i.e.
Q: Why do they work?
A: For money.
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Re: Local Colloquialisms

Postby gmalivuk » Tue May 31, 2016 11:30 pm UTC

That answers questions about purpose, but many "why" questions aren't asking about the purpose of anything.
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