Your Own Contribution to the English Language

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Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Ephemeron » Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:57 pm UTC

This is the thread to post words or phrases that you would like to share with the world. They could be ones you've coined yourself, or something a friend has introduced to you, and you wished more people said it, or perhaps a reconditioning of an existing word. This idea for a thread came about because I only tell a few people in the real world. If we start using each other's words, maybe they'll catch on.

I'll start the ball rolling.

gligible
[GLI-juh-bul / glɪd͡ʒəbʊl] adj.
Antonym of 'negligible', somewhat important, significant

The next one is kind of a joke.

homeopath
[HO-me-oh-path / həʊmʲoːpæθ] n.
Pejorative for a stupid person, one with principles based on obviously flawed logic

My eventual hope is for 'homeopath' to become such a common insult that it becomes shortened to 'homo', replacing the current definition of the latter word.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby skullturf » Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:19 am UTC

mondayn
adjective

Ordinary, unremarkable, or boring, in a manner reminiscent of a typical Monday.

glibtrotter
noun

A person who briefly visits a country, and thereafter fancies themselves an expert on that country.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby lucrezaborgia » Wed Jan 04, 2012 12:49 am UTC

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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Fire Brns » Wed Jan 04, 2012 1:09 am UTC

Perquemps:
Simmilar to perhaps but applicable only in relation to instances of time.
Example:
"Will she be her tomorrow?"
"Perquemps"
(I think it developed from attempting to say perchance and perhaps at the same time)

Agratain:
orient, in relation to a task.
"We need to install this water heater"
"Ok, let me just agratain the situation"
(My grandfather used this alot)
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Microscopic cog » Wed Jan 04, 2012 11:50 am UTC

skullturf wrote:mondayn
adjective

Ordinary, unremarkable, or boring, in a manner reminiscent of a typical Monday.


When saying the word aloud, it sounds like mundane. I hoped mondays 500 years ago were boring as well, but nope. :(
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby PM 2Ring » Thu Jan 05, 2012 10:01 am UTC

Here's one of my sister's neologisms.

incatpussitate
verb
The action of a cat sitting on your lap in such a way that you can't move.
Eg, "Can you pass me my coffee, I'm incatpussitated?"
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby RebeccaRGB » Sat Jan 07, 2012 6:24 pm UTC

wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've

Also, stepth to replace steepness with something that matches width and depth.
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Al Gore: I don't know. But I can darn well tell you where we're not—the universe!
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Derek » Sat Jan 07, 2012 8:07 pm UTC

RebeccaRGB wrote:wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've

Not to disappoint you, but you didn't invent those. :P
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby RebeccaRGB » Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:29 pm UTC

Derek wrote:
RebeccaRGB wrote:wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've

Not to disappoint you, but you didn't invent those. :P

I didn't say I did.
Ephemeron wrote:They could be ones you've coined yourself, or something a friend has introduced to you, and you wished more people said it, or perhaps a reconditioning of an existing word.
Stephen Hawking: Great. The entire universe was destroyed.
Fry: Destroyed? Then where are we now?
Al Gore: I don't know. But I can darn well tell you where we're not—the universe!
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby dhokarena56 » Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:43 pm UTC

Metrotaku- a guy who secretly enjoys shojo manga/anime.
Come join Dadapedia- the open-source Dadaist novel that anyone can edit.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Derek » Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:58 pm UTC

dhokarena56 wrote:Metrotaku- a guy who secretly enjoys shojo manga/anime.

My anime club recently came up with a different term for that: Brojou.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby MattSoave » Mon Jan 16, 2012 9:16 pm UTC

I was trying to come up with a direct antonym of "apathetic" (not quite the same as "empathetic") and could only come up with "pathetic." "I'm very pathetic about this issue" -- Doesn't really work. :)
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Iulus Cofield » Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:47 pm UTC

Actually, that's approximately the very old definition of pathetic, but yes, people today will almost certainly misunderstand.

I'd like to claim credit for the word "drinkery", which I usually gloss as "the fine art of drinking", but it seems someone named luvabeans beat me to the punch by a couple of years. She apparently speaks the same dialect as me, internet, so the <-ry> suffix must be alive, if not well, out here.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Fire Brns » Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:54 pm UTC

MattSoave wrote:I was trying to come up with a direct antonym of "apathetic" (not quite the same as "empathetic") and could only come up with "pathetic." "I'm very pathetic about this issue" -- Doesn't really work. :)

Pathapic?
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Angua » Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:31 pm UTC

trademaculation. My boyfriend wanted a word for hte action you use to clean your eyelashes and hair when you pull them to do so. That was what an English student and classics student came up with.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Fire Brns » Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:43 pm UTC

So as a propper definition you mean: To drag the fingers along the length of hair to remove dirt, oil, or other matter for a grooming purpose.
Pfhorrest wrote:As someone who is not easily offended, I don't really mind anything in this conversation.
Mighty Jalapeno wrote:It was the Renaissance. Everyone was Italian.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Angua » Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:00 pm UTC

Well, it can be used for removing dirt from anything small and long enough for you to pull along I guess. Trad- apparently comes from the greek for to pull and emaculation is cleaning.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Gagundathar The Inexplicable » Wed Jan 18, 2012 5:42 pm UTC

How about 'computilator'?
For a computer that mutilates things.

As in, "that dang computilator completely screwed up my spreadsheet".
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Ouch.jars » Wed Jan 18, 2012 5:51 pm UTC

RebeccaRGB wrote:wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've


I've used "shouldn't've'd" before, as in "he shouldn't've'd a fourth glass of wine."

I've also tried to popularise "probn't" (probably not) and "maybn't" (maybe not).
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Fire Brns » Wed Jan 18, 2012 6:02 pm UTC

Not enough people use "per-maybe-haps"

I also tend to add "hi-frikkin" to the beginning of adjectives.
Originally from "hi-frikkin-larious" it can go to "hi-frikkin-amazing" or "hi-frikkin-fantastic" as examples.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Derek » Thu Jan 19, 2012 12:45 am UTC

Ouch.jars wrote:
RebeccaRGB wrote:wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've


I've used "shouldn't've'd" before, as in "he shouldn't've'd a fourth glass of wine."

Now you see, the problem here is that I hatehatehate seeing/hearing people contract "have" (or it's forms) when it's a main form. You can't do that! "I've an idea". No you don't, you have an idea or you've got an idea, but you can't you've an idea!

/petpeeve

(I think this is an American/British distinction, but I still can't stand it)
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Iulus Cofield » Thu Jan 19, 2012 1:17 am UTC

I too much prefer my main verbs stressed and unreduced.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby PM 2Ring » Thu Jan 19, 2012 10:22 am UTC

Derek wrote:I hatehatehate seeing/hearing people contract "have" (or it's forms) when it's a main form. You can't do that! "I've an idea". No you don't, you have an idea or you've got an idea, but you can't you've an idea!

I expect that you don't like "I've got an idea", then.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Angua » Thu Jan 19, 2012 10:24 am UTC

Derek wrote:
Ouch.jars wrote:
RebeccaRGB wrote:wouldn't've, couldn't've, and shouldn't've


I've used "shouldn't've'd" before, as in "he shouldn't've'd a fourth glass of wine."

Now you see, the problem here is that I hatehatehate seeing/hearing people contract "have" (or it's forms) when it's a main form. You can't do that! "I've an idea". No you don't, you have an idea or you've got an idea, but you can't you've an idea!

/petpeeve

(I think this is an American/British distinction, but I still can't stand it)

Do you have a problem with 'It's great', 'She's a leo', 'I'm hungry', 'You're ridiculous', and 'They're all zombies'.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Iulus Cofield » Thu Jan 19, 2012 10:52 am UTC

Silly Angua, copulas and modals aren't main verbs. Why else are they unstressed?

Similarly, and more accurately, 've is an auxiliary and 've got is a perfect. Very distinct from have.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Derek » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:15 pm UTC

PM 2Ring wrote:
Derek wrote:I hatehatehate seeing/hearing people contract "have" (or it's forms) when it's a main form. You can't do that! "I've an idea". No you don't, you have an idea or you've got an idea, but you can't you've an idea!

I expect that you don't like "I've got an idea", then.

Nope, "got" is the main verb. I specifically said this form was ok in my post.

Do you have a problem with 'It's great', 'She's a leo', 'I'm hungry', 'You're ridiculous', and 'They're all zombies'.

Forms of "be" are perfectly fine to contract. It's only "have" when used as a main verb (denoting possession) that is a problem.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby UniqueScreenname » Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:38 pm UTC

Anticompromise - when the decision that is made is bad for all parties involved.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby ekolis » Fri Jan 20, 2012 2:46 am UTC

Friggot - A generic insult to be used around people who would chastise you if you were to use an actual swear word. Pronounced like "frigate", but it's really derived from "friggin' faggot"!

Note: I don't think I came up with this myself; I believe my brother did when he was a teenager :D
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby PM 2Ring » Fri Jan 20, 2012 9:34 am UTC

Derek wrote:
PM 2Ring wrote:I expect that you don't like "I've got an idea", then.

Nope, "got" is the main verb. I specifically said this form was ok in my post.

Oh, yeah! :oops:

ekolis wrote:Reading posts on the xkcd forum makes me feel stupid.

Excellent.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Ephemeron » Sun Feb 12, 2012 3:30 am UTC

I am fed up of people talking about 'carbon emissions'. Not only is technically incorrect, but it demonizes carbon. Saying 'carbon dioxide emissions' is too many syllables, and it feels weird to refer to a common chemical by its formula the whole time. So I came up with this, derived from the pronunciation of 'CO2'.

cotwo
[co-TOO / koʊtuː] n, uncountable
Carbon dioxide, CO2, in any physical state

Go on, say it. What have you been doing to reduce your cotwo emissions?

Note that the accent would naturally be on the second syllable. 'Cotu' is an accepted alternate spelling.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby eSOANEM » Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:53 am UTC

Ephemeron wrote:Note that the accent would naturally be on the second syllable. 'Cotu' is an accepted alternate spelling.


For me it sounds weird as cotú rather than cótu but I don't think my dialect has the /oʊ/ phoneme in unstressed syllables whereas it does have /u/ in them.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Ephemeron » Sun Feb 12, 2012 10:43 am UTC

You can pronounce it how you want. I guess I underestimated the power of trochees.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Iulus Cofield » Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:18 am UTC

There's a general tendency for stress to end up on the penultimate syllable for whatever reason and stressed final syllables are also pretty rare.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Pingouin7 » Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:22 pm UTC

Blag: The actual word for Blog.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby SheffJames » Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:57 am UTC

My shared at house at Uni gave three, based on the surnames of the people who lived there.

To Burtoft is to say you'd do something when you had no intention of doing it.
To Kenners is to mess something up beyond the point of retrieval ("I've kennersed this drawing")
To Bingham is to make up new words and just assume everyone else knew what they meant.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby UniqueScreenname » Tue Feb 14, 2012 10:05 pm UTC

SheffJames wrote:To Kenners is to mess something up beyond the point of retrieval ("I've kennersed this drawing")

They did the same thing to Britta on Community.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Simbera » Wed Feb 15, 2012 2:38 pm UTC

I think I've mentioned it in another thread, but I extended the "once, twice, thrice" system to be applicable to all numbers: just do it as "fourth, fifth, sixth" do it but replace the "th" with "ce". I tend to spell the 5 one "fivce" because I prefer how it looks, but everything else works exactly as you'd expect.

Also I suspect it's been done by others but I've never seen it written - gunnoo. Contraction of "going to", because "gonna" does not reflect the way I say "going to" in some situations (I use both, it just depends on what I would stress in its uncontracted form). This one wasn't a conscious creation, it's just how I've always said it.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby ekolis » Fri Feb 17, 2012 7:19 pm UTC

Simbera wrote:I think I've mentioned it in another thread, but I extended the "once, twice, thrice" system to be applicable to all numbers: just do it as "fourth, fifth, sixth" do it but replace the "th" with "ce". I tend to spell the 5 one "fivce" because I prefer how it looks, but everything else works exactly as you'd expect.


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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Eugo » Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:24 am UTC

Maybe I did invent some words, can't remember - but what I have somewhere in a file is this list of twisted, misconnected or otherwise mangled sayings.

2nd class struggle
a completely different kettle of worms
let whoever lives in a glass house cast the first stone
benefit of the shade of the doubt
our story takes place and time at...
life or death insurance
let's call it an afternoon
let's try and/or get it done by tomorrow
for the very first time after time and again.
observation makes you see things
he doesn't take no for an answer - he takes it for a walk/for a while/for a fool/to a dinner.
it only goes to show, but then can't find its way back
then the paramilitary band played a polka.
she shortchanged. into a miniskirt.
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Re: Your Own Contribution to the English Language

Postby Katifer Dragonite » Sun Feb 19, 2012 1:01 am UTC

My friend said this by accident once (she didn't even realise that it's not a real word), but it has now become integrated into our dialogue.
melge: v. To combine two words with the same or similar meanings to create a portmanteau with the same or similar meaning.
or n. A word created by melging.
The best thing about it is that melge is itself a melge. Another example (said by the same friend a few days later) would be cram-packed, a melge of jam-packed and crammed.
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