Need Help with a Substitution Code

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msanon25533
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Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby msanon25533 » Fri Nov 06, 2015 4:04 am UTC

Hi Guys, I'm new to the forums, so hopefully this is the right place to put this!
I received the following code, with the information that every fourth sequence of two is to be removed, and each letter is represented by two random symbols. I have put the different symbols into different letters in order to solve with a mode of substitution:
ABBCCADAABCAEFG
AHABIJIJKLAMANBOKEANAJ
AINPFGAQ
I have also been informed that each line is a sentence.
Any help is greatly appreciated! :D

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PTGFlyer
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby PTGFlyer » Wed Feb 17, 2016 3:47 pm UTC

I only see three sequences of two.

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Pied typer
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby Pied typer » Sat Mar 12, 2016 6:41 pm UTC

PTGFlyer wrote:I only see three sequences of two.

Spoiler:
Maybe "sequences of two" means letters grouped two at a time, not doubled letters. Thus we get:
ABBCCADAABCAEFG
A
HABIJIJKLAMANBOKEANAJ
AINPFGAQ
Which is:
ABBCCAABCAEF
HABIJILAMANBOKNAJ
AINGAQ

Let's start with the last line. That looks like the easiest.
AINGAQ
Now, given that every line is a sentence, I can conclude that this is a single word, as there aren't any sentences one can make using two one-letter words. This information is extremely helpful, as there is only one sentence construction in which a one-word sentence is grammatically correct: imperatives. Thus the third line is a three-letter base form action verb where every letter is unique, and no direct object is required. I'm not really feeling up to finding a list of these, though, so I'm going to ask a different question: if every letter is represented by two symbols, then why does the second line have an odd number of symbols?
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jestingrabbit
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby jestingrabbit » Mon Mar 28, 2016 10:24 am UTC

Spoiler:
They could be represented by adjacent letters, which would make the last line 5 symbols, not 3. But I'm not good at these, so...
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DanD
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby DanD » Wed Apr 13, 2016 5:23 pm UTC

Pied typer wrote:
PTGFlyer wrote:I only see three sequences of two.

Spoiler:
Maybe "sequences of two" means letters grouped two at a time, not doubled letters. Thus we get:
ABBCCADAABCAEFG
A
HABIJIJKLAMANBOKEANAJ
AINPFGAQ
Which is:
ABBCCAABCAEF
HABIJILAMANBOKNAJ
AINGAQ

Let's start with the last line. That looks like the easiest.
AINGAQ
Now, given that every line is a sentence, I can conclude that this is a single word, as there aren't any sentences one can make using two one-letter words. This information is extremely helpful, as there is only one sentence construction in which a one-word sentence is grammatically correct: imperatives. Thus the third line is a three-letter base form action verb where every letter is unique, and no direct object is required. I'm not really feeling up to finding a list of these, though, so I'm going to ask a different question: if every letter is represented by two symbols, then why does the second line have an odd number of symbols?


Spoiler:
The question would be does the count restart at the beginning of each line. In which case:

ABBCCADAABCAEFG
AHABIJIJKLAMANBOKEANAJ
AINPFGAQ
Resulting in:
AB BC CA AB CA EF
AH AB IJ KL AM AN KE AN AJ
AI NP FG

This gets rid of the odd number issue.

The other concern is that, likely, spaces are not coded for. Therefore that last sentence could be a two word statement: "I am" "I do", etc. That being said, it is very likely a single word. If this were a longer text, it would be very susceptible to statistical analysis (I would guess AB is either a vowel or a t) but I'm not sure how to proceed based on the available data.

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Pied typer
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby Pied typer » Sun May 15, 2016 6:15 pm UTC

jestingrabbit wrote:
Spoiler:
They could be represented by adjacent letters, which would make the last line 5 symbols, not 3. But I'm not good at these, so…

Spoiler:
I think you're right about that, actually. Looking over DanD's post, I realized that if the last line is merely three letters, then it doesn't share any letters with the rest of the code, so it would be impossible to distinguish between "run" and "die".

That creates a problem, though, as if you think about the encoding scheme, every letter must have many encoding methods.
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DanD
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby DanD » Mon May 16, 2016 1:58 pm UTC

Pied typer wrote:
Spoiler:
jestingrabbit wrote:[spoiler]They could be represented by adjacent letters, which would make the last line 5 symbols, not 3. But I'm not good at these, so…

I think you're right about that, actually. Looking over DanD's post, I realized that if the last line is merely three letters, then it doesn't share any letters with the rest of the code, so it would be impossible to distinguish between "run" and "die".

That creates a problem, though, as if you think about the encoding scheme, every letter must have many encoding methods.


Spoiler:
Every letter would be encoded by a single letter, with the preceding letter determining which single letter. In the reductionist case, AB would be the same as BB would be the same as CB, etc. Realistically, you'd probably shift your index. Given that this was apparently random symbols originally, not alphabetic, there's no particular reason to assume the index shift would be linear, and if that's the case, I don't believe it's solvable without more information.

Also relevant is that you would still need 26 unique symbols to represent the full alphabet (not all symbols might be used in this text, admittedly) We have 17 here. Not sure if that means anything.

Quixote
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Re: Need Help with a Substitution Code

Postby Quixote » Thu Jun 16, 2016 10:14 pm UTC

I would like to see the symbols. There might be a conscious or unconscious clue in the choice of symbols.


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