Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

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Tyndmyr
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Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:59 pm UTC

Aright, I'm delving around in essentially basement manufacturing, which seems to be really niche. Not a lot of commercial/well tested solutions for most stuff, and I'm looking for fairly reliable hardware. Conveyor belts, etc are pretty standardized, I'm good there, but a lot of automating processing steps has a workflow of "pick something up, stick it over here" in a way that is somewhat beyond a funnel onto a belt or whatever.

For instance, I'd like to, when a 3d print finishes, have something grab the tray, run it under water, grab the piece when it falls off, and stick it elsewhere for further processing(orientation unimportant, it can just go into a bin). Anyone know of a decent, fairly inexpensive solution for this, or is it all custom built stuff? I'm okay with handling anything in software, but the only robotic arm I've got is pretty lightweight in terms of capability, and is basically just a toy.

KnightExemplar
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby KnightExemplar » Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:25 pm UTC

Interns. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:

I'm guessing this is all custom built stuff. Maybe you can custom build something using Actobotics (sold at ServoCity and/or Sparkfun). But it'd definitely run you hundreds of dollars plus many hours of debugging to whip together an Arduino + custom robots that handle these sorts of tasks.

If Actobotics is too small (its more for hobby electronics), some people have been using 80/20 aluminum prototyping. I've heard of robots being built out of 80/20, although most of the time its more like custom furniture projects.
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Tyndmyr
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:43 pm UTC

Hundreds is fine...even a grand is worthwhile for something good at it. Sadly, professional level equipment for this far exceeds this budget. =) Mostly looking to minimize the tinkering, as that can eat time pretty rapidly. The Actobotics looks potentially useful. I've got a short stack of Arduinos I'm not using at present, so maybe I can find something close enough to crib heavily from...hmmm.

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Izawwlgood
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Izawwlgood » Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:53 pm UTC

So, perhaps unrelated to the OP, but i couldn't help but click on the ServoCity link and poke around a bit... do any of you have a recommendation for reading material for getting started with basic robotics/electronics? I'm semi-interested in building a quadcopter.
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Tyndmyr
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Jul 20, 2015 9:58 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:So, perhaps unrelated to the OP, but i couldn't help but click on the ServoCity link and poke around a bit... do any of you have a recommendation for reading material for getting started with basic robotics/electronics? I'm semi-interested in building a quadcopter.


Still related, IMO. There's an utter crapton of information out there for such things, but finding the good information is not so easy. About half of it is absolutely trivial "plug in the wire" stuff mostly meant to get kids enthused about science and such, and half is deep into EE stuff, with comparatively little in the middle for ramping up an adult on the process of building practical automation.

Quadcopters might be slightly easier than most topics, since "drones" are now cool in a way that RC aircraft were not. However, I copped out here and just ordered a lilybot. 'nuff quads on the market to just buy instead of build.

Edit: Dammit, so many shinies. This is going to result in additional projects, I just know it.

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Izawwlgood
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Jul 21, 2015 1:15 am UTC

I bought the Symo somethingsomething, which for the price point was an immensely cool and easy copter. While reading up on them a bit, I found this website, which seems pretty neat, but I have no idea about the pricing, and furthermore, the whole... I dunno, buy a kit, put it together, fly, seems a little less involved than what I was hoping for with respect to learning about the systems and construction. They seem to have all the parts you'd need, and a forum that seems moderately active, but there's no reading materials or suggestions that I can see for learning about stuff, annnnnnnnd for now, my capacity to buy and try and tinker is somewhat limited. I'd rather make a single purchase and tinker than buy something, realize it's not what I want, have to buy something else, etc.
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Tyndmyr
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Tyndmyr » Tue Jul 21, 2015 7:34 pm UTC

Kits aren't too bad for starting with, really. Even RC aircraft, you generally start out with a kit because there's a lot of variables in aircraft design that all affect each other. Once you've got a platform working, it's easier to twerk and test than an entire scratch build with no experience is(I actually went back and grabbed a kit, after mucking about for a while with a mini-predator concept).

It's at least nice that quads are becoming so common now...it strikes me as likely to encourage more standardization. Plus, some of the smaller ones are getting very affordable indeed. Even amazon has a mess of little ones that are fairly small/affordable, and you can probably stand to break one or two learning to fly/mucking with it/whatever. Flying being what it is, that's a big plus.

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Izawwlgood
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Jul 21, 2015 7:59 pm UTC

That's a good point. Maybe I'll pick up that kit and start tinkering with that. I think part of my issue is I'm a poor graduate student, so see the 200 price tag and wince, but I need to accept that hobbies cost money.
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Tyndmyr
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Re: Light robotics/pick and place Hardware

Postby Tyndmyr » Tue Jul 21, 2015 8:25 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:That's a good point. Maybe I'll pick up that kit and start tinkering with that. I think part of my issue is I'm a poor graduate student, so see the 200 price tag and wince, but I need to accept that hobbies cost money.


Well, that's normal, I think. As careers progress and what not, the level of acceptable purchase on impulse or whatever scales. There was a point in time where I was scavaging parts from old electronics, because I didn't have a lotta spare money. Nothing wrong with that, it's just another time/money tradeoff.

All in the value you expect to get out of it, I suppose. I get a lotta good tinkering out of most of my hobbies, so it doesn't bother me a great deal...now, it's much more of a time crunch where I simply can't spend nearly as much time on hobbies as I'd wish.


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