Burying a cat5e UTP cable

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johnie104
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Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby johnie104 » Mon Jul 04, 2011 9:00 pm UTC

Hey guys,

For a project I need to bury a UTP cable for 50 metres. The cable will lie under brick pavement and cars will run over those bricks (but not a lot). Will the UTP cable hold it without extra reinforcement or would you recommend putting protection around it? We don't have the money for the UTP cables that are specifically made to be put under the ground. I've heard that taping the cable in duck tape also helps, is this true?
Any other suggestions regarding burying UTP cables?

Thank you for your time.
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GeorgeH
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby GeorgeH » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:35 pm UTC

They do make "direct burial" cable, but I believe it's mostly for moisture and UV resistance. I wouldn't bother wrapping the cable in duct tape; I doubt it would help all that much and it would be incredibly annoying to do. As for resisting the force of a car, I really wouldn't worry about it - you could run over your hand with 6" of dirt packed on top and a cable isn't nearly as sensitive to be being squished.

I would consider laying some PVC pipe and running the cable through that. PVC is cheap, and that way you'll have a conduit that you'll be able run other cables through along with a huge amount of additional protection for your first cable. In the US they make grey colored (as opposed to white) PVC pipe for running electrical wires through; someone at your local hardware store will probably be able to show you the best stuff to use.

EvanED
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby EvanED » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:27 pm UTC

If you go with the PVC pipe thing, I'd be careful about mildew and other long-term moisture-related problems.

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naschilling
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby naschilling » Tue Jul 05, 2011 12:38 am UTC

Have you considered installing a wireless bridge instead?
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johnie104
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby johnie104 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 10:25 am UTC

It's to be considered a fun project, and a wireless bridge isn't nearly as fun. It also doesn't offer the same speed as a gigabit cable.
@ EvenED: How long-term is that? And how would you prevent that?
I'll try the pvc pipes.
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EvanED
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby EvanED » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:08 am UTC

No clue. I'm not even 100% sure there would be one. All I know is that some other types of underground, pipe-based installations (e.g. some geothermal heating/cooling) have to worry about problems like that.

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Bhelliom
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby Bhelliom » Tue Jul 05, 2011 4:18 pm UTC

I buried a long length of the grey pvc for a few runs of cat6 out to my shop. It has a few curves and bends in it, so I used a pipe size that a ping-pong ball fits into. After the pipe was assembled and glued up, (glue to keep water out!) We tied a ping pong ball to a long spool of string. Put the ball in one end, attach a shop vac to the other. In a few seconds you have a string through the whole run, ready to pull cables.

Everything has been good for 5 years now.
"Eloquently Blunt"

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Solt
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby Solt » Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:14 am UTC

Bhelliom wrote:I buried a long length of the grey pvc for a few runs of cat6 out to my shop. It has a few curves and bends in it, so I used a pipe size that a ping-pong ball fits into. After the pipe was assembled and glued up, (glue to keep water out!) We tied a ping pong ball to a long spool of string. Put the ball in one end, attach a shop vac to the other. In a few seconds you have a string through the whole run, ready to pull cables.

Everything has been good for 5 years now.


That is genius!
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produced a more reliable product. But sailors do
not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a
most annoying habit of splitting in two."
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scarecrovv
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby scarecrovv » Sat Jul 09, 2011 4:38 pm UTC

@Bhelliom: until you said "shop vac" I had no idea where you were going with that. Awesome.

If you're concerned about moisture, sealing the pipe will not protect against condensation, and sealing can fail in any case. The answer is drainage. It is less important to seal the pipe than it is to have holes in the bottom, and not the top. I've never done this before, so simpler solutions may work too but I'd recommend building the pipe in wide, shallow V shape, so that the ends are high (so you can access them) and the middle is the lowest point. At the middle, have a T junction, with another 6 inches or so of pipe going straight down, and open at the end. This will pull water down to a contact with the dirt, where it can soak away, but the little bit of vertical pipe will keep dirt from coming up into the main pipe. Also, I'd put a bit of wire screen over the end of the drain pipe, to keep out burrowing animals.

Obviously, in order to make Bhelliom's awesome vacuum trick work, the main pipe will need to be larger than a ping pong ball, and the drain pipe will need to be smaller than one.

Remember, I have not tested this. I'm just saying what I think. If you set yourself on fire and become a screaming human candle as a result of following my directions, I am not responsible.

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Bhelliom
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby Bhelliom » Sun Jul 10, 2011 4:54 am UTC

I have never heard of needing a drain pipe, I just plug both ends with silicone when I get done pulling cables. I can remove the plug if I ever need to run more. The tiny amount of water vapor in the pipe is not going to bother the cable, but if any animals do get inside, they think cable jacket is tasty.
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scarecrovv
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby scarecrovv » Sun Jul 10, 2011 1:11 pm UTC

You're probably right. I defer to Bhelliom on this one.

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LinuxPenguin
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby LinuxPenguin » Sun Jul 10, 2011 3:29 pm UTC

Better to seal the pipe. The little bit of moisture inside won't harm the cable. I would trongly recommend using outdoor-rated cat-5. It's got stuff* in it that repels moisture, and lubricates the individual wires, so it's easier to run through conduits and stuff.



*Que me, the first time i ever used it, radioing my boss and asking: "Why in the blue hell is this cable packed with congealed elephant sperm!?"
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roflwaffle
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Re: Burying a cat5e UTP cable

Postby roflwaffle » Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:17 pm UTC

Solt wrote:
Bhelliom wrote:I buried a long length of the grey pvc for a few runs of cat6 out to my shop. It has a few curves and bends in it, so I used a pipe size that a ping-pong ball fits into. After the pipe was assembled and glued up, (glue to keep water out!) We tied a ping pong ball to a long spool of string. Put the ball in one end, attach a shop vac to the other. In a few seconds you have a string through the whole run, ready to pull cables.

Everything has been good for 5 years now.


That is genius!


Gotta love pigs! I've heard a few stories from a friend who works in safety about them flying to obscene heights/areas and totaling cars when someone jacked up the pressure too much or forgot the proper restraint at the exit.

Back OT, besides sealing up all the joints and siliconing the end, a "drip loop", or in this case a "drip bend" is a good idea so that any water getting past the sealed ends won't be able to get down into the horizontal portion.


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