Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Apparently, people like to eat.

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Sat Mar 09, 2013 9:54 pm UTC

I'm trying to expand my cooking toolbox beyond the basic pan-fry/braise/roast some meat/vegetables. I live close to a nice little seafood and poultry shop that has a lot of less common ingredients -- quail, rabbit, rarish meats (camel, python, alligator), shellfish, non-chicken eggs, etc. etc., and I'm not sure where to begin. I don't just want to pick something at random and experiment with it, because this stuff is quite a bit more expensive than my usual chicken/beef/whitefish. What are your favorite underutilized or less common ingredients and recipes?

No need to limit this thread to meats. Feel free to recommend underutilized vegetables, spices, herbs, grains, sauces, whatever.

P.S. I tend to favor stuff that I can do on my stovetop, on account of my oven sucking, but I'm sure that if you have a good oven recipe, there'd be others who'll appreciate it.

User avatar
Zohar
COMMANDER PORN
Posts: 7505
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:45 pm UTC
Location: Denver

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Zohar » Sat Mar 09, 2013 10:11 pm UTC

I love truffles. I haven't actually had real truffles ever - just truffle oil or truffle paste, but I really like their flavor. They go well in omelettes and of course mushroom sauce. Plenty of times I used my truffle oil as dressing for a creamy mushroom sauce. It's important to make sure the other flavors are mild and don't overpower the truffles. On the other hand, you don't want to put too much truffle stuff in whatever you're doing, since they can be overpowering themselves (similar to nutmeg, if you've used it).

Something nice I doubt is as common there, and I don't even know if it's available - halloumi cheese. I should probably buy some tomorrow :) It's a type of very firm cheese. What you'd like to do is slice it and fry it in olive oil on both sides until it looks blistered. Then take it off the stove and spread some za'atar on it (though salt and pepper would work too). Then you can eat it beside a leaf salad or something like that for a light dinner that still feels substantial.

Those are a couple of things I can think of right now, if I'll have any later I'll post more.
Mighty Jalapeno: "See, Zohar agrees, and he's nice to people."
SecondTalon: "Still better looking than Jesus."

Not how I say my name

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Sat Mar 09, 2013 10:30 pm UTC

Great recommendations. I am a fan of halloumi, but haven't thought of it in years.

User avatar
PictureSarah
Secretary of Penile Nomenclature
Posts: 4576
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:37 pm UTC
Location: Sacramento, CA
Contact:

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PictureSarah » Sat Mar 09, 2013 10:35 pm UTC

Ever since we bought a kaffir lime tree, we've used the leaves in quite a few things. You can get them at Asian groceries - not even expensive. Also bay leaves, but you probably already use those, because they're so common in Indian rice dishes especially. It helps that my dad has a bay tree at his work and can bring us branches of it for free.
"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:51 pm UTC

I'll keep an eye out for kaffir lime leaves. I haven't tried to cook Thai-type things in a while. I do use bay leaves, though the ones I usually find at the local grocery store are kind of tasteless. But that reminds me; I should make some Filipino Adobo.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Mar 11, 2013 12:02 am UTC

The problem with your question is that braising, frying, baking and boiling are about the only methods there are for cooking.
You may be feeling bored with your ingredients-there are some good books out there that talk about flavors, and how to make the flavor profile you want. You can find them at the library.
You may want to expand your techniques, so when you're at the library look up a book on a new technique, like Cooking Under Wraps, which is all about foods cooked in wrappers, edible(think dumplings) and inedible( think tamales). While you are still frying, baking or boiling, you are doing more interesting stuff first.
Or you could become a molecular gastronomist, and make your foods into gels and foams and spheres and so on.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Mon Mar 11, 2013 1:02 am UTC

Good points. I was thinking more of ingredients than cooking methods when I wrote the post, but that didn't come across in my wording.

Speaking of cookbooks, I was just looking at Fuchsia Dunlop's stuff. Seems like a good way to get into Chinese cooking. I've been enjoying the contrast between different regional Chinese cuisines (or their Seattle versions), but I've never really tried cooking them at home.

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8915
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: One of those hot places

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Bakemaster » Wed Mar 20, 2013 3:23 am UTC

First thing that came to mind after you mentioned seafood shops: Scallops. Though they're not particularly uncommon, just expensive and easy to screw up, which means I almost never eat them, despite loving the shit out of them.

I'm guessing you're already familiar with goat meat so I'll spare the sermon on its virtues.

Hmm. Do you cook with capers? How about smelly little baitfish (sardines, anchovies)? Kalamata olives? Really, all sorts of olives can be like new experiences. Same goes for mushrooms - how about these creepy but delicious little fuckers? Or wood ears. Can't remember if those are actually mushrooms or not. Used a lot in moo shu.

Leeks? Not uncommon but maybe a little under-utilized, seems like people don't use them much outside of soup which is a shame. I feel similarly about barley. I had some really great barley when we ate at the Rogue brewery. It was basically a pile of barley with tons of butter, I think. Man, that was good.

How about golden needles/lily blossoms? Really great in soups. I have an interesting soup recipe involving ground pork and lily blossoms if you're interested.

How do you feel about quinoa?
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Wed Mar 20, 2013 5:36 am UTC

Thanks; great ideas. I've never cooked scallops, though I do like them. I'll pick some up. I do use goat, capers, various tiny fish (in tinned, paste and sauce form), Kalamatas, and sometimes leeks and quinoa. Never cooked with barley, shimejis or wood ears. I believe I saw some lily blossoms at a local store a couple of days ago, but didn't pick any up. Sure, I'd be interested in your recipe.

New cooking ingredients I've tried since starting this thread:
  • Sichuan peppercorn
  • Pickled mustard greens (Thai-style, though they were pretty similar to the Taiwanese-style I've had in the past)
  • Chili-bean paste (soy instead of fava)
  • Wakame (dried seaweed)
  • Kombu (other dried seaweed)

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Mar 20, 2013 2:53 pm UTC

Scallops are easy, because you do so little to them.
Get nice big ones, dry packed. They should be off-white, a very pale beige. Pull off the muscle attached to one side.
Fine chop some garlic
Heat a pan with some butter or olive oil over moderate heat. Pat the scallops dry with a paper towel and lightly sprinkle with salt. Put in the pan and let cook for about a minute, until the bottom is nicely golden brown. Flip over. Add a bit more butter to the pan and the garlic. Pour in a splash of white wine if you want. Pull off the heat.
Serve.
Bread, rice, pasta- whatever you like to soak up the sauce.
Trader Joes has small bags of 10 minute grains. I love farro, a type of wheat, and they have barley as well. It can be nice to not have to get 10# of something just to try it.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Zohar
COMMANDER PORN
Posts: 7505
Joined: Fri Apr 27, 2007 8:45 pm UTC
Location: Denver

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Zohar » Wed Mar 20, 2013 8:37 pm UTC

It says recipe recommendations, so I need one.

For Passover dinner, I need to make a vegetarian main course. Or sorta main course. The side dish will be small baked potatoes (with olive oil, garlic, rosemary etc.).

I was thinking mushrooms, but I'd like the mushroom caps to stay whole, and if I can find them - fairly large as well, not something resembling gravy or a stew. Since it's for passover, it can't contain regular flour (but I can use matzo flour which is similar to breadcrumbs). Preferably it wouldn't contain dairy either, but that's not a must. Any ideas?
Mighty Jalapeno: "See, Zohar agrees, and he's nice to people."
SecondTalon: "Still better looking than Jesus."

Not how I say my name

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Wed Mar 20, 2013 10:37 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:It says recipe recommendations, so I need one.

For Passover dinner, I need to make a vegetarian main course. Or sorta main course. The side dish will be small baked potatoes (with olive oil, garlic, rosemary etc.).

I was thinking mushrooms, but I'd like the mushroom caps to stay whole, and if I can find them - fairly large as well, not something resembling gravy or a stew. Since it's for passover, it can't contain regular flour (but I can use matzo flour which is similar to breadcrumbs). Preferably it wouldn't contain dairy either, but that's not a must. Any ideas?

I was going so suggest a ragout, because that'd go well with potatoes, but it'd violate the no gravy rule. So I guess the obvious options are (a) marinate, skewer and grill, or (b) roast in a pan. Either way, you'd probably want some kind of sauce on the side. I've had some good Indian-style mushroom 'kababs', often with other vegetables (and paneer or halloumi), but I don't know if that'd suit a passover meal.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Mar 21, 2013 12:29 pm UTC

Get the hugest mushrooms you can and stuff them. Your stuffing can have matzoh meal, herbs and garlic and cheese, and maybe some chopped hard-boiled egg. If they need to be parve you can leave off the cheese, of course. Then bake them for about 20 minutes in a hot oven.
It's easier to fill the caps using a pastry bag or a scoop.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8915
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: One of those hot places

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Mar 23, 2013 1:38 am UTC

Soup recipe (edit: for Nath, not for Zohar. sorry bro. har.)
Spoiler:
Bean Thread Noodle Soup
Somlah Mee Souah
from The Elephant Walk Cookbook, which you should buy after making this recipe, this cookbook is 100% LEGIT

1/4 cup small dried black fungus (aka wood ear, small means 20-30 per ounce)
15-20 dried lilies (about 1/2 ounce)
3-4 ounces bean thread noodles
2 tbsp vegetable oil
4 garlic cloves, smashed
1/4 pound ground pork
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
4 cups chicken broth (6 cups if serving with rice)
15 small dried shrimp (about 1 tbsp), rinsed and drained
1 tbsp fish sauce
2 scallions, cut into 2-inch pieces
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper

Soak the black fungus, dried lilies and bean thread noodles in separate bowls (I have done this in the same bowl, nbd) in warm water to cover for 10 minutes, then drain. Cut the noodles into 3-inch lengths, using scissors, and set aside.

Heat the oil in a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat and saute the garlic until golden brown (for lurkers THIS DOES NOT MEAN BURN THE GARLIC I am sure Nath knows what to do), 5 to 10 seconds. Stir in the pork, breaking apart any clumps, then stir in the salt and sugar. Add the chicken broth, turn the heat up to high and as the broth comes to a boil, add the shrimp, black fungus, dried lilies and fish sauce. When the broth reaches a boil, lower the heat to a simmer.

Add the noodles to the broth. Cook, stirring, for about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, add the scallions and pepper, stir and serve at once.

PAstrychef wrote:Scallops are easy, because you do so little to them.

I agree, but you have to get it fresh and cook it yourself, unless you can both find and afford a seafood restaurant that has enough confidence in the freshness of its ingredients to not overcook the scallops. Paying $17 for rubber gets old in a hurry. The few times I've felt like I could justify buying fresh scallops at the grocery store, they turned out great.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Sat Mar 23, 2013 8:37 am UTC

Thanks! I'll report back on the soup and PAstrychef's scallop method once I pick up the ingredients.

User avatar
AngrySquirrel
Hellish Sex Goddess
Posts: 983
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:26 am UTC
Location: The Northpole

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby AngrySquirrel » Tue Jul 16, 2013 7:27 am UTC

So, sweet potatoes. I've been trying out stuff with them lately. Mainly making homemade chips out of them. I slice them into very thin slices, soak them in a vinegar/oil/salt/spices mix, then bake them in the oven.

It's fairly tasty, but they tend to get a bit too mushy and I need to discuss with someone what might be clever ways to avoid that.

I don't have access to any kind of deep frying-thingamajig.

My current approach is low heat + long time baking. However the difference between a little mushy and black coal seems to be very small.

The other option I can think of is to slice the slices even thinner, but I don't quite know how to go about doing that as what I'm currently using is a cheese slicer and I don't really have anything that slices thinner than it does.

Would it be an option to try and dry them out more before putting them in the oven? How?
Putting the fist into pacifist.

they/them/theirs

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:07 am UTC

You might try hasselbacking them. The vinegar also probably doesn't help; maybe get some amchur powder or sumac for tanginess without moisture.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:05 pm UTC

Do you have a pot that is fairly deep? Deep enough to cook pasta will work. That's all you need for frying.
Here's a recipe for the baked variety:

INGREDIENTS
2 medium sweet potatoes, scrubbed and sliced 1/8 inch thick
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt, preferably sea salt
1 lime, cut into wedges, for serving

DIRECTIONS
STEP 1
Preheat oven to 400 degrees, with racks in center and lower positions. Divide sweet potatoes between 2 rimmed baking sheets. Drizzle with oil, toss, and spread them in a single layer on sheets. Bake, flipping once, until centers are soft and edges are crisp, 22 to 25 minutes. Sprinkle with salt, and serve with lime wedges.
You add the flavors after they are baked. The slices need to be pretty dry before you toss them with oil.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
dubsola
Posts: 2216
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 11:55 am UTC
Location: Sunny Snakeville

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby dubsola » Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:35 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:Scallops [...]Pull off the muscle attached to one side.

I never do this.

User avatar
EchoRomulus
Posts: 192
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:26 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby EchoRomulus » Tue Sep 03, 2013 1:55 am UTC

This isn't very rare, or even uncommon, but oil is too often overlooked. When you say oil, I think "Olive oil". Most people think "Vegetable oil." If I had a pint for every time a friend or relative deuced up a recipe because they used the wrong oil...

A good, high end extra virgin olive oil can be like swapping spit with God. The olive oil they give you at my favorite Italian restaurant makes me want to fill up on their bread. But make sure the stuff you buy is 100% pure. Sometimes they try to cut it with lesser oils. Always read the label thoroughly.

90% of the oil and fat I use in cooking is olive oil. (Extra virgin usually because it has become the most common) 9.5% is butter, and .5% is Crisco. (I only use it for making fried chicken, French fries, or other fried foods)

Bacon fat is starting to be rediscovered as well. I would put it on the pie chart for my fat/oil usage, but it's been a while since I've had bacon.

Now for some actual underappreciated food items.

Be them ever so common, Jiffy muffin mixes in the blue box. They are simple, fast, and cheap. Here's a how to guide for how I make them.

Jiffy Apple Cinnamon: Add some dried dates.

Jiffy Blueberry: Nuts. Walnuts or peanuts preferably.

Jiffy Raspberry: chocolate chips. not jumbo ones. small ones.

That last one is probably the most profound boost to an already fine product. But the best muffin by far is a date-walnut combination I haven't seen in stores since childhood. Luckily you can find dried dates at Rite-Aid!
"In here life is beautiful." --Cabaret

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Mon Feb 10, 2014 12:32 pm UTC

I was pottering around at a Vietnamese grocery and found some dried lilies, so I made the soup Bakemaster suggested. I'm a fan. I'm about to help myself to a second bowl, and I think I'll stir in a little nam prik pao.

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8915
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: One of those hot places

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Feb 11, 2014 4:20 am UTC

Fist pump! If you're in Boston, eat at that restaurant for sure.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
AngrySquirrel
Hellish Sex Goddess
Posts: 983
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:26 am UTC
Location: The Northpole

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby AngrySquirrel » Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:03 pm UTC

So I've got garlic bread, grated cheese and some leftover mix of creme fraiche and spices. I need to turn this into food, I have access to a store. I do not have a lot of time. Any suggestions?

Edit: By "not a lot of time" I mean, I get off work in two hours. When that happens I'll have 1 hour and 30 minutes to buy food, get home, shower, make food, get dressed and leave.
Putting the fist into pacifist.

they/them/theirs

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:15 pm UTC

Garlic bread pizza? You could pick up some kind of tomato sauce or paste, some kind of cured meat, and maybe some arugula or other greens. Top garlic bread with tomato, meat and cheese, bake briefly in a screaming hot oven, top with the greens dressed in a quick vinaigrette.

Or: make a quick ragout with, say, mushrooms, shallots, thyme, stock, creme fraiche, vinegar. Meanwhile, toast the garlic bread in the oven. Top garlic toast with ragout.

User avatar
AngrySquirrel
Hellish Sex Goddess
Posts: 983
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:26 am UTC
Location: The Northpole

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby AngrySquirrel » Thu Mar 13, 2014 1:35 pm UTC

Nath wrote:Garlic bread pizza? You could pick up some kind of tomato sauce or paste, some kind of cured meat, and maybe some arugula or other greens. Top garlic bread with tomato, meat and cheese, bake briefly in a screaming hot oven, top with the greens dressed in a quick vinaigrette.

Or: make a quick ragout with, say, mushrooms, shallots, thyme, stock, creme fraiche, vinegar. Meanwhile, toast the garlic bread in the oven. Top garlic toast with ragout.

Oh, those both sound really good. I think I'll make an attempt at the pizza-option as that seems quickest. Thanks :)

(Off-topic: shallots amuse me.)
Putting the fist into pacifist.

they/them/theirs

Wonderbolt
Posts: 212
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2014 12:11 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Wonderbolt » Fri Mar 21, 2014 4:49 pm UTC

Many simple dishes can taste completely different depending on what kind of marinade you use for the meat. For example, a marinade of a good olive oil, kecap manis and red bell pepper (powder) works extremely well with roasted chicken. Would definitely recommend giving it a try.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1558
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Quercus » Sat Apr 05, 2014 7:31 pm UTC

So, sweet potatoes. I've been trying out stuff with them lately. Mainly making homemade chips out of them. I slice them into very thin slices, soak them in a vinegar/oil/salt/spices mix, then bake them in the oven.


The best sweet potato recipe I've come across is a Japanese one - roasted, marinated sweet potatoes. I'm working from memory here but I think the marinade consisted of honey, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and the potato wedges were marinated for 2-4hrs and sprinkled with sesame seeds prior to roasting.


To the OP (if you are still watching this thread!) - exactly how does your oven suck? I've dealt with sucky ovens in the past and there's things that can make them work for you - if it's over/under cooking all you need as a calibrated oven thermometer so you can set the oven temperature correctly, if it's cooking unevenly you need to get to know it first. Bake a tray of cookies at every level in the oven and you can see the temperature distribution by the pattern of browning. After this you can work out how to rotate your dishes to get them more even. This won't work for bread or soufflés too well, but most other stuff isn't that fussy.

If you really want to go unusual - get hold of some razor clams. They are bloody wonderful. Just grill them with some olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper - they don't need anything else apart from a sprinkle of chives or parsley to serve.

Finally, if you can get hold of it, samphire grass (it's a succulent plant that grows by the see in north-west Europe) is the best accompaniment to fish I've come across - just steam it and serve with melted butter (or a squeeze of lemon juice if you are watching calories). I've never seen it outside of the UK though.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4622
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby poxic » Mon Jul 14, 2014 5:59 pm UTC

I'm trying to make a dairy- and gluten-free pastry shell (well, a dozen small ones). All of the recipes I can find online use vegan shortening of one or another sort, which I'd rather not have to buy.

I improvised a test batch using all-purpose GF flour mixed with almond and coconut flours. Water and canola oil did a decent job of making a dough out of it. Make into balls, press into greased muffin pan, twelve minutes at 375F. Presto: slightly doughy too-thick objects that needed a bit more cinnamon and sweetener.

Next attempt will probably involve rolling out the dough and cutting into circles, then personhandling the circles into the aforementioned muffin pan. Apparently filling the cups with dry beans will help keep them from puffing up?

The goal is a decently crisp-but-not-too-shattery small cup that will hold a fruit thing. (The fruit thing will probably be my next post: planning to cover blueberries with a mango-raspberry sauce of some sort.)

Any pointers? Is there a recipe I can actually follow, or should I just give up and go buy a tub of solid coconut oil for the sake of a couple of tablespoons? Would beating in an egg be of any assistance?
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

I hope Heaven has a periscope to Hell, because humans are really only happy relative to other humans.
- Zach Weinersmith

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Jul 14, 2014 6:15 pm UTC

An egg will make your dough closer to a cookie texture. The solid fat used in pastry crusts is essential in making a flakey dough. The bits of fat get smeared thin between layers of flour. A liquid fat, ie oil, will make a crumbly dough. So if you want the flakey texture, you will need some kind of solid fat. Is crisco verboten?
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4622
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby poxic » Mon Jul 14, 2014 6:32 pm UTC

No, just large. I don't like keeping aging vats of rarely-used ingredients, nor throwing out nearly-full things. I may have to get over that.

Alternately, I can try a cookie texture. That probably won't be terrible but it would prevent a hand-held dessert. The first bite would send everything a-crumbling.
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

I hope Heaven has a periscope to Hell, because humans are really only happy relative to other humans.
- Zach Weinersmith

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Jul 14, 2014 6:47 pm UTC

You can get crisco in bars, and it freezes well. Frozen, it makes better pie crust. The giant can is not inevitable. In cookie-like crusts, look up pate sable recipes for ratios of flour:fat:egg:sugar. Plenty of tartletts have sable crusts and don't fall apart on the first bite. Working with GF flour, either press in the dough or roll it between two pieces of plastic wrap.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4622
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby poxic » Mon Jul 14, 2014 7:09 pm UTC

Ooh neat. I'll look into the sablés for the next effort.
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

I hope Heaven has a periscope to Hell, because humans are really only happy relative to other humans.
- Zach Weinersmith

User avatar
ahammel
My Little Cabbage
Posts: 2135
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:46 am UTC
Location: Vancouver BC
Contact:

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby ahammel » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:00 am UTC

What's a good way to get some of the onioniness out of an onion without cooking it? I often soak sliced onion in cold water for a bit, but that seems to leave a bit too much bite. I've made them into quick pickles as well with repeated salt/lime juice washes, but that takes a bit too much work for a last-minute salad.
He/Him/His/Alex
God damn these electric sex pants!

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Jul 18, 2014 12:04 am UTC

Use a milder onion. Get a vidalia, or other sweet onion, a red onion, some shallots or scallions. Any of those will have less bite than a regular yellow or white onion. You can also try microwaving the slices for about 15 seconds, wrapped in paper towel.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Thesh
Made to Fuck Dinosaurs
Posts: 5497
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:55 am UTC
Location: Colorado

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Thesh » Tue Dec 30, 2014 10:30 pm UTC

So I'm going to make Chicken Pot Pie next weekend. It's been years since I've made it, and it's been years since I made pie crust. The last pie crust I made that turned out well was made with, IIRC, shortening and all purpose flower, but I have no clue what recipe I used. So I'm looking for recommendations for a savory pie crust. I'm a fan of simple recipes with minimal ingredients. It's also been a long time since I made chicken pot pie, and I'm thinking chicken stock (which I will probably make Friday, and recommendations are welcome here as well), peas, carrots, celery, onion, fresh thyme (should be some left over after I make the stock), a blonde roux, and a mix of white and dark meat for the filling.
Honesty replaced by greed, they gave us the reason to fight and bleed
They try to torch our faith and hope, spit at our presence and detest our goals

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2768
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Dec 30, 2014 11:46 pm UTC

Pie crust is simple indeed if you remember the ratio-3-2-1 which is parts of flour, fat and water. Weight is the easiest measure. You scale it depending on how much crust you need.
12oz flour
8 oz fat
4 oz cold water.
For a savory crust you can add some salt and pepper, and use lard or duck fat instead of butter or shortening. Some folks swear by adding some vodka to the liquids, giving a more workable dough. The alcohol doesn't make the dough tough, the way more water would.
I've never tried it myself, since at work the needed amount of vodka would get expensive,
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3145
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby Nath » Wed Dec 31, 2014 1:48 am UTC

I have used this crust for savory pies, with good results. I just left out the sugar. And yeah, you can replace half the water with cold vodka for a little less gluten formation.

User avatar
natraj
Posts: 1639
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:13 pm UTC
Location: away from Omelas
Contact:

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby natraj » Wed Dec 31, 2014 2:30 am UTC

i have had very excellent results with vodka pie crusts. mmm.
You want to know the future, love? Then wait:
I'll answer your impatient questions. Still --
They'll call it chance, or luck, or call it Fate,
The cards and stars that tumble as they will.

User avatar
freezeblade
Posts: 1082
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 5:11 pm UTC
Location: Oakland

Re: Ingredient and recipe recommendations

Postby freezeblade » Tue Jan 06, 2015 5:13 pm UTC

I use 3-2-1 as well for my pie crusts, but with a bit of a twist in the method (which is similar to how i make flakey biscuits or a blitz puff pastry dough):

Half of the fat source is lard, the other half is butter. The lard you crumble into the flour (and a pinch of salt) until it is the texture of coarse cornmeal. Then the cold butter is added in 1/8" slices cut right from the stick. Pinch the butter slices into pieces the size of dimes in the flour, then add the ice water (or water mixed with whiskey/rum/brandy/whatever) and turn the dough out onto a lightly floured coutertop. Pat into a rough rectangle, then do a letter fold of the dough. Roll the resulting dough out into a large rectange, fold again, and repeat with one more fold.

I picked up the method from the Tartine pastry book, which they use for gallets. The quality of super-flakey crust this creates is beyond awesome, somewhere between puff pastry and pie crust. It's a little more work than my old method, but oh so worth it.
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests