Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Apparently, people like to eat.

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
EchoRomulus
Posts: 192
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:26 pm UTC

Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby EchoRomulus » Wed Sep 11, 2013 2:35 am UTC

This is a thread for people to post problems and offer solutions to common problems with food in general.

Here are a few common kitchen problems I have and what I've done to try to solve them.

Rotten mushrooms.

Now first I began to bag mushrooms in brown paper bags instead of bags and plastic ones and put them in my golden basket. (a tree basket apparatus made of yellow chain mail in a well ventilated part of the kitchen) And that seemed to solve it. But then I got a batch that dried up in like 3 days. So I decided to place a slightly damp clean sponge in the bag. (New right out of the bag) So hopefully that will help. Even if it doesn't, I would rather throw away dried up brown mushrooms than wet moldy smelly ones.

Not enough storage.

Hanging baskets and adding shelves that can screw into the walls helps a lot. But the biggest thing I think is to just sit down and give everything a place. And make sure you bring a chair up. You will do a better job if you are comfortable and not trying to get done as quickly as possible.

Cleaning

Boiling water on ceramic countertops and metal surfaces will eliminate 95% of messes with minimal scrubbing.

Smelly hands.

Rub the flowers from your home grown herbs between your palms. Better than hand lotion. Don't have home grown herbs? I HIGHLY recommend them.
"In here life is beautiful." --Cabaret

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2710
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:09 am UTC

I keep my shrooms in a bag I made from a cotton dish towel. It keeps them in the dark and it keeps them dry enough. If the bottom of the drawer gets wet they will go slimy, but that's infrequent. If they dry out I will just save them and use them in stock or stews.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
EchoRomulus
Posts: 192
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:26 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby EchoRomulus » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:18 am UTC

So you don't put them in the fridge either.
"In here life is beautiful." --Cabaret

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8896
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: tinyurl.com/dybqlp

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Bakemaster » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:05 am UTC

What is this, 18th-century France? Wash your hands.
Last edited by Bakemaster on Tue Sep 17, 2013 8:48 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
Sandry
My cheese is pants?
Posts: 1800
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 3:36 am UTC
Location: Camberville
Contact:

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Sandry » Tue Sep 17, 2013 3:53 pm UTC

Y'know, there are points where you've washed your hands repeatedly, but they still don't smell quite right.

Also, it's a *forum*. People create threads in it so that there continues to be actual activity of any sort in the forum. I don't see why you're so incensed, and I think you're being a jerk. Take a deep breath or something.
He does not spout ever more, new stupidities. He "diversifies his wrongness portfolio."
(My pronouns are She/Her/Hers)

User avatar
natraj
Posts: 1630
Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2007 10:13 pm UTC
Location: away from Omelas
Contact:

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby natraj » Tue Sep 17, 2013 7:19 pm UTC

Sandry wrote:Y'know, there are points where you've washed your hands repeatedly, but they still don't smell quite right.


usually after cutting up lots of onions and garlic for me D: can scrub and scrub and they still smell kind of. onio-garlicky.

i mean okay it's up for debate whether that is bad or not but sometimes i wish to have hands that don't make me want to eat them up.
You want to know the future, love? Then wait:
I'll answer your impatient questions. Still --
They'll call it chance, or luck, or call it Fate,
The cards and stars that tumble as they will.

User avatar
Angua
Don't call her Delphine.
Posts: 5580
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:42 pm UTC
Location: UK/[St. Kitts and] Nevis Occasionally, I migrate to the US for a bit

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Angua » Tue Sep 17, 2013 7:38 pm UTC

My grandmother swears by rubbing your fingers along the metal tap after cutting up garlic and onion to get the smell off them.
'Look, sir, I know Angua. She's not the useless type. She doesn't stand there and scream helplessly. She makes other people do that.'
GNU Terry Pratchett

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8896
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: tinyurl.com/dybqlp

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Sep 17, 2013 9:44 pm UTC

Sandry wrote:I don't see why you're so incensed, and I think you're being a jerk. Take a deep breath or something.

More exasperated than incensed. It's not that I don't understand; when I was new to this forum, I too was enthusiastically asinine from time to time, until the disapproval of established users motivated me to improve the quality of my posts. But you're right, I crossed the Saladin line, so I'll redact the cuss-words and try again. (Though I refuse to abandon my acerbic wit; that glass, after all, remains half full.)

Dear EchoRomulus, I'm genuinely thrilled that your participation has prompted a burst of activity recently in a subforum that has seen relatively little over the past year. That being said, we have a limited number of explicit rules here, one of which is that universal tenet of message board etiquette: the search function is your friend; use it. Tell me, why is your cheese thread so much more epic than this one, which had 3 years of activity and would have been perfectly appropriate to continue? Note how in this later thread, the OP explicitly acknowledges the previous cheese thread and provides a rationale for the new one. Good policy, that.

How about your alfredo sauce thread—what makes it so fresh and distinct from either of these? Even if you ultimately decided to create a new thread, had you skimmed these beforehand, you might at least have learned how "roux" is spelled. Your request for advice about what to do with your leftovers would have fit very nicely in an existing thread as well.

As for this topic, you could have contributed your mushroom spoilage tips to Food storage / spoilage / safety; the rest reads like an eHow article. Are you sure you provided all the necessary information for the eager counter-cleaner? I'm no arbiter of good taste, but perhaps you might consider the rewards of putting a little more thought into a brand new topic before rubbing it out on the rest of us. Welcome to the internet.

Anyway, I've thrust my rotten mushroom into this thread more than enough for one day; back to your regularly scheduled not me.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1494
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Chopping onions (a solution which actually works!)

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:36 pm UTC

Here's a solution for those of us who are affected badly by syn-Propanethial S-oxide, otherwise known as the compound which makes you cry when chopping onions. I have tried most of the commonly recommended solutions: leaving the base of the onion intact (what, you want me to throw away perfectly good bits of every onion I chop), chopping underwater (messy, slippery, difficult to see the onion once there's blood in the water), wearing swimming goggles (ineffective). What I do now is chop the onion fast, put it in a bowl and stick it under the hob extractor fan on high until I need to use it - your very own home fume cupboard. Make sure to either wash the knife and the chopping board immediately, or stick them under the fan too.

User avatar
raudorn
Posts: 331
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:59 am UTC

Re: Chopping onions (a solution which actually works!)

Postby raudorn » Thu Sep 19, 2013 2:32 pm UTC

Quercus wrote: wearing swimming goggles (ineffective).


Could you elaborate? I tried tight-fitting swimming goggles (well, they have to be water-tight after all) and they worked like a charm. They reduce vision, escpecially since they replace corrective glasses, but for cutting onions it's manageable. I can hover my head right in the fumes and my eyes don't tear up. It could have something to do with tear ducts. Other than that, controlled air circulation seems to do the trick.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1494
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 19, 2013 3:19 pm UTC

Could you elaborate? I tried tight-fitting swimming goggles (well, they have to be water-tight after all) and they worked like a charm.


Yes, I was surprised when they didn't work and assumed that it was something to do with tear ducts, but I can think of 3 potential reasons they didn't work for me 1) I used a pair of old googles that may not have been quite water-tight. 2) They were sufficiently annoying that I may have taken them off before getting rid of all the onion residue on cutting boards etc. (it was so long ago that I can't actually remember whether I got teared up while they were on, or soon after I took them off) 3) It's actually something to do with tear ducts.

Personally I find them such a pain, and the extractor fan works so well that I don't plan to try them again.

User avatar
raudorn
Posts: 331
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:59 am UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby raudorn » Thu Sep 19, 2013 4:45 pm UTC

Well, a diver's mask might me sufficiently sealed. But at that point the solution becomes too ridiculous. Only the snorkel would be missing. :lol:

Another problem I'd like to see solved is the old butter/margarine problem. Outside of the fridge it soon turns rancid, but keeping it cool all the time is annoying to spread it on bread. I suppose one solution is to have small portions kept warm, but that just means weird scheduling, because you have to remember to take it out in the evening if you want it soft in the morning.

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8896
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: tinyurl.com/dybqlp

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Bakemaster » Thu Sep 19, 2013 8:51 pm UTC

The fumes from onions that make you cry do so by inhalation, not by as well as contact with the eye. That's why the home remedy of holding a piece of bread in your teeth is supposed to have some potential; in theory, it acts as a filter right under your nostrils. In practice, the bread is either too floppy or too delicious to keep from eating.

You can mitigate the problem by keeping your knives sharp and working quickly; the less crushing action there is on the onion, the less fumes you'll have to deal with.. Anecdotal experience says you can get somewhat acclimated, but I'm not sure if this is true or if it's just a product of differential potency of onions plus confirmation bias.

EDIT: Looks like the fumes have the same effect by direct contact, and inhaling them just increases that contact. Page 142 of this book makes the claim about acclimation but doesn't cite.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1494
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:41 pm UTC

Another problem I'd like to see solved is the old butter/margarine problem. Outside of the fridge it soon turns rancid, but keeping it cool all the time is annoying to spread it on bread. I suppose one solution is to have small portions kept warm, but that just means weird scheduling, because you have to remember to take it out in the evening if you want it soft in the morning.


I do actually aliquot my butter into approx. 15g slices (the brand I get has marks on the packet at regular intervals corresponding to a certain weight, which makes it easier). I wrap them in greaseproof paper, leaving a little space between each slice and folding to form a neat package, and then freeze them. Keeps them really fresh for baking.

For toast etc. I find that the "spreadable" butter actually works really well (it has about 1/4 vegetable oil if I remember correctly). You do notice a difference in taste from butter, but it's just different rather than worse IMO. I wouldn't use it for baking or sauces though - the different physical properties could mess up forming the proper emulsion etc., especially in sauces.

For an informal breakfast making sure you put the butter on the toast as soon as it comes from the toaster works as well - the toast is sufficiently hot to melt it even if it has been in the fridge.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2710
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:07 pm UTC

What you need is a butter bell. It sits on your counter, and the water in the jar keeps the butter from going rancid. Contact us at Dark River Pottery and we will make you one in just about any color you like, for a reasonable price.
I would copy in an image but I don't know how :cry:
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8896
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: tinyurl.com/dybqlp

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Bakemaster » Fri Sep 20, 2013 4:31 am UTC

I use a butter bell and can vouch for their effectiveness.
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4577
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby poxic » Fri Sep 20, 2013 4:37 am UTC

I solve the onion problem by putting the chopping board on the stove (with burners cold and covered) and turning on the fume fan. Almost the same solution as Quercus, except I don't have to hurry.

If I start a burner going before I've chopped the onions, though, it becomes somewhat more difficult.
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

The intellect of man is forced to choose / Perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse / A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
- William Butler Yeats, writer, Nobel laureate (13 Jun 1865-1939)

User avatar
dubsola
Posts: 2206
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2007 11:55 am UTC
Location: Sunny Snakeville

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby dubsola » Fri Sep 20, 2013 5:48 am UTC

Quercus wrote:aliquot

TIL.

PAstrychef wrote:What you need is a butter bell. It sits on your counter, and the water in the jar keeps the butter from going rancid. Contact us at Dark River Pottery and we will make you one in just about any color you like, for a reasonable price.
I would copy in an image but I don't know how :cry:

Colour me intrigued.

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3139
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Nath » Fri Sep 20, 2013 6:01 am UTC

There are also spreadable butters that are just butter, e.g. http://kerrygoldusa.com/products/butter ... sh-butter/

User avatar
SurgicalSteel
Posts: 1926
Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:18 pm UTC
Location: DMV, USA

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby SurgicalSteel » Sun Sep 22, 2013 12:17 am UTC

For onions I 1) use a sharp knife and 2) After skinning them, I cut them in half then soak them in water for about 10 minutes before continuing to cut. No problems with tearing up.
"There's spray paint on the teleprompter
Anchorman screams that he's seen a monster (mayday)
There's blood stains on his shirt (mayday)
They say that he's gone berserk."
--Flobots "Mayday"

Sheikh al-Majaneen
Name Checks Out On Time, Tips Chambermaid
Posts: 1037
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 5:17 am UTC
Location: couldn't even find coffee in copenhagen

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Sheikh al-Majaneen » Sun Sep 22, 2013 3:14 am UTC

At my job I often have to cut ten to fifteen onions a day.

I stick them in the freezer after skinning and coring them. Works well enough. Given more time, I would prefer to freeze them, skin/core them, freeze them again, then chop them.

User avatar
Tomlidich the second
Posts: 1230
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Tomlidich the second » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:19 pm UTC

seasoning meat creates unique issues.

pour seasoning on, flip meat to get other side- hand now covered in meat juice, don't touch seasoning bottle! wash hands again. season. flip meat. dammit, meat juices again.

i don't like going stabbity with things cuz the yummy internal juices tend to leak out and stuff.
Image

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3139
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Nath » Tue Dec 31, 2013 1:20 am UTC

Stabbing something once or twice will not lose a noticeable amount of juices; it'll only leak out of the fibers that you tear, and a fork does not have much cross-sectional area. But there are always tongs.

Unrelated question: anyone have experience roasting pheasant? I've got one defrosting in the fridge for tomorrow. I hear they work a little differently from chickens.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2710
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Dec 31, 2013 1:22 am UTC

Been think about that very bird, Nath. They tend to be very low in fat, so either butter under the skin or bacon over it would be good.
I plan to braise the one mom has in her freezer.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3139
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Nath » Tue Dec 31, 2013 6:41 am UTC

Yeah, I'm planning on a slow roast with bacon on top. I doubt any of the fat will be absorbed by the meat, but it might insulate the breasts a bit, the way some people use aluminum foil. The downside: less crispy skin. Also debating whether to spatchcock it. I'll salt the bird tomorrow morning, probably, so that it has a few hours to suck it in a bit.

EDIT: pushed some butter under the skin of the breast, and put a few strips of bacon on top. Cooked at 300°F till it hit 145°F or so, then took off the bacon, rubbed some oil, and cooked it a little further in a hot oven to finish. Thew it under the broiler for a couple of minutes at the very end. Breast temperature leveled off at 160°F.

Worked alright. The thighs were perfect, but the breasts were inevitably a little dry, like your average Thanksgiving turkey breast. Still good, particularly with the bacon. Overall, I liked the flavor of pheasant, but it's milder than quail, dryer than chicken, and costlier than either. The drumsticks have a bunch of weird ligaments to cut around. Worth trying, but I don't see myself cooking this bird often.

User avatar
Quercus
Posts: 1494
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:22 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Quercus » Thu Jan 02, 2014 4:26 pm UTC

Tomlidich the second wrote:seasoning meat creates unique issues.

pour seasoning on, flip meat to get other side- hand now covered in meat juice, don't touch seasoning bottle! wash hands again. season. flip meat. dammit, meat juices again.

i don't like going stabbity with things cuz the yummy internal juices tend to leak out and stuff.


As Nath says you need to get yourself some good quality tongs - Something like these are cheap, heatproof and easy to clean. Either that or designate a "meat hand" and a "seasoning hand".

User avatar
Tomlidich the second
Posts: 1230
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Tomlidich the second » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:17 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
As Nath says you need to get yourself some good quality tongs - Something like these are cheap, heatproof and easy to clean. Either that or designate a "meat hand" and a "seasoning hand".


Nath wrote:Stabbing something once or twice will not lose a noticeable amount of juices; it'll only leak out of the fibers that you tear, and a fork does not have much cross-sectional area. But there are always tongs.



well, off to find some quality tongs!

(don't have any tongs at all now that i think about it. huh.)
Image

User avatar
firechicago
Posts: 620
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:27 pm UTC
Location: One time, I put a snowglobe in the microwave and pushed "Hot Dog"

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby firechicago » Sat Jan 04, 2014 5:16 pm UTC

Tomlidich the second wrote:seasoning meat creates unique issues.

pour seasoning on, flip meat to get other side- hand now covered in meat juice, don't touch seasoning bottle! wash hands again. season. flip meat. dammit, meat juices again.

i don't like going stabbity with things cuz the yummy internal juices tend to leak out and stuff.


The other option is to measure out the seasoning you'll need into a small bowl or ramekin beforehand. Then you don't need to worry about getting meat juices on them, because they're all going on the meat eventually, and the bowl can be washed.

User avatar
Tomlidich the second
Posts: 1230
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Tomlidich the second » Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:47 pm UTC

firechicago wrote:
Tomlidich the second wrote:seasoning meat creates unique issues.

pour seasoning on, flip meat to get other side- hand now covered in meat juice, don't touch seasoning bottle! wash hands again. season. flip meat. dammit, meat juices again.

i don't like going stabbity with things cuz the yummy internal juices tend to leak out and stuff.


The other option is to measure out the seasoning you'll need into a small bowl or ramekin beforehand. Then you don't need to worry about getting meat juices on them, because they're all going on the meat eventually, and the bowl can be washed.


eh, i never end up knowing how much- just end up winging things.
Image

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5554
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby sardia » Tue Jan 14, 2014 5:49 pm UTC

Nath wrote:Stabbing something once or twice will not lose a noticeable amount of juices; it'll only leak out of the fibers that you tear, and a fork does not have much cross-sectional area. But there are always tongs.

Unrelated question: anyone have experience roasting pheasant? I've got one defrosting in the fridge for tomorrow. I hear they work a little differently from chickens.

Just use a fork. Or two forks. Meat is not a balloon, it's millions of tiny balloons that pop separately as you stick it. You'll leak juices in the tiny area where you stabbed it, and thats it.

Heisenberg
Posts: 3789
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 8:48 pm UTC
Location: Uncertain

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Heisenberg » Tue Jan 21, 2014 4:00 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:Either that or designate a "meat hand" and a "seasoning hand".

This is the way to go. Open your sauce/oil/spices first, then season with the left, rub/flip with the right. If you have to two-hand something (I like fresh ground pepper on steaks) use a bowl and pre-grind.

User avatar
Tomlidich the second
Posts: 1230
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Tomlidich the second » Thu Jan 23, 2014 12:34 am UTC

Heisenberg wrote:
Quercus wrote:Either that or designate a "meat hand" and a "seasoning hand".

This is the way to go. Open your sauce/oil/spices first, then season with the left, rub/flip with the right. If you have to two-hand something (I like fresh ground pepper on steaks) use a bowl and pre-grind.


huzzah to fresh ground pepper!

suppose i can give it a go, it feels awkward to not actively engage both hands with a task (example, typing, driving, slaughtering my enemies,)

but hey, new experiences!
Image

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4577
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby poxic » Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:02 pm UTC

Cabbage help requested! I have a habit of buying a head of (ordinary green) cabbage, chopping it into tiny bits, then storing the bits in a tightly-sealed container for periodic use. I sometimes put a sheet of paper towel in the container to sop up the water that otherwise collects on the inside of the lid.

Regardless of what I do, the cabbage bits get little black dots of mold on them after about a week. The bits are otherwise still in good condition -- not soggy or mushy. Is there anything that will stop the mold (short of spraying it all with bleach)?
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

The intellect of man is forced to choose / Perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse / A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
- William Butler Yeats, writer, Nobel laureate (13 Jun 1865-1939)

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2710
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:16 am UTC

Don't cut so much at a time. Also, just about everything will start to mold after a week. If you have one big chunk of cabbage you can peel off the outside leaves and use the rest.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
Tomlidich the second
Posts: 1230
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:38 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Tomlidich the second » Fri Mar 14, 2014 6:00 pm UTC

I really want a set of these

because tis awesome.
Image

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4577
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby poxic » Wed Jun 04, 2014 11:31 pm UTC

New problem! My egg-yam muffin things sometimes stick to the baking cups. I'll make a few batches in a row where they all pop straight out of the cups, then one batch will lose 30% of itself to the peeling process.

I've mostly ruled out overcooking, though I could probably cut the time down by another minute or two. I'm not following the linked recipe very closely -- using sweet potato in placed of African yam, fewer egg yolks, no milk, some parmesan in place of corned beef, a Tbl of flour to give some body to the dough, half batches.

Might it be an issue with fat content? I used a bit less butter today than usual (for no particular reason), and I leave out all but one yolk because I don't like the over-rich taste they give.
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

The intellect of man is forced to choose / Perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse / A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
- William Butler Yeats, writer, Nobel laureate (13 Jun 1865-1939)

User avatar
Bakemaster
pretty nice future dick
Posts: 8896
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:33 pm UTC
Location: tinyurl.com/dybqlp

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby Bakemaster » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:40 am UTC

Yeah, that would be my first guess. This clearly calls for more batches... for SCIENCE!
Image
c0 = 2.13085531 × 1014 smoots per fortnight
"Apparently you can't summon an alternate timeline clone of your inner demon, guys! Remember that." —Noc

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4577
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby poxic » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:44 am UTC

Tasty, tasty science. And an excuse to use more butter.

(A coworker said these taste like omelettes. I spice the shit out of them with cumin, coriander, basil, allspice and turmeric -- allergic to pepper or else that would be in there -- and add just a squeeze of mustard to get some tang going on.)
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

The intellect of man is forced to choose / Perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse / A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
- William Butler Yeats, writer, Nobel laureate (13 Jun 1865-1939)

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 2710
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Jun 05, 2014 3:59 am UTC

Try using pan spray (Pam) on your baking papers before putting in the batter. The amount of time they sit in the pan after baking can make a difference too, since they will steam in the pan, making everything a bit soggy,
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4577
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Kitchen Problems (and Solutions!)

Postby poxic » Thu Jun 05, 2014 4:24 am UTC

Pam is a decent idea. I usually take the papers off right away since letting them sit never improves anything (paper-wise).
TEAM SHIVAHN
Pretty much the best team ever

The intellect of man is forced to choose / Perfection of the life, or of the work,
And if it take the second must refuse / A heavenly mansion, raging in the dark.
- William Butler Yeats, writer, Nobel laureate (13 Jun 1865-1939)


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests