Food fleeting thoughts

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Peaceful Whale
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Peaceful Whale » Tue Mar 06, 2018 1:02 am UTC

Mangos are ok...
This new brand of dried mangoes dusted in sugar is the devils work... they are so goooood...

Slightly related: I have a serious dried mango addiction and need help...
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby poxic » Tue Mar 06, 2018 1:11 am UTC

Wait until the manufacturers start cheaping out and it all goes shitty. Worked for me.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sandry » Tue Mar 06, 2018 1:34 am UTC

I don't really understand why anyone ever dusts mango in sugar. They have plenty of sugar already. Unsugared dried mango is delicious.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:18 am UTC

freezeblade wrote:Re: Grapefruit

I love grapefruit, but really only the yellow or lightly pink varieties, not the dark red ones you see on the market here (California), which don't taste...grapefruity...enough in my opinion.

Being a Texan, I’ve only ever had the red ones. As Central Texas is not a very good citrus growing area, we just get the ones from big growers in the Valley.

freezeblade wrote:The climate out here isn't very good for grapefruit (not nearly hot enough), so I've been hunting for some grapefruit-hybrids which will produce satisfactory analogs in more northern climes


Do you know if summer heat or a warm winter is more important for grapefruit? Also, I’ve been toying with the idea of growing some citrus. I’ve seen pictures of fruiting oranges, mandarins, and grapefruit in Charleston, SC (admittedly, done by a very skilled grower in a good microclimate) and they get more hard freezes than we do in the winter (~10 vs ~5). So, it is probably doable (there is the occasional yard with a mandarins or even grapefruit or oranges, but they’re not common). The tricky part, I think, is the speed at which we can alternate between warmth and cold in the winter — it’s not uncommon for a 70° day to be followed by a night at like 25° (so there isn’t necessarily much semi-dormancy). Also, it’s probably an issue that our thin, alkaline soils aren’t good for trifoliate orange rootstock... Do you have any tips/suggestions?

Peaceful Whale wrote:Mangos are ok...
This new brand of dried mangoes dusted in sugar is the devils work... they are so goooood...

Slightly related: I have a serious dried mango addiction and need help...

Mangos aren’t citrus! They are really tasty though. I don’t know why anybody would dust dried mango with sugar — it’s sweet enough on its own that I sometimes feel the need to wash out my mouth afterwards...

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby natraj » Tue Mar 06, 2018 2:06 pm UTC

mangoes are plenty sweet as-is & are ideal to be dusted with chili & lime, or cumin & kala namak. yum.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Zohar » Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:14 pm UTC

Pomelos may be my favorites but barring those - some type of orange probably.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby freezeblade » Tue Mar 06, 2018 3:57 pm UTC

pogrmman wrote:Do you know if summer heat or a warm winter is more important for grapefruit? Also, I’ve been toying with the idea of growing some citrus. I’ve seen pictures of fruiting oranges, mandarins, and grapefruit in Charleston, SC (admittedly, done by a very skilled grower in a good microclimate) and they get more hard freezes than we do in the winter (~10 vs ~5). So, it is probably doable (there is the occasional yard with a mandarins or even grapefruit or oranges, but they’re not common). The tricky part, I think, is the speed at which we can alternate between warmth and cold in the winter — it’s not uncommon for a 70° day to be followed by a night at like 25° (so there isn’t necessarily much semi-dormancy). Also, it’s probably an issue that our thin, alkaline soils aren’t good for trifoliate orange rootstock... Do you have any tips/suggestions?.


The heat in summer is most important (along with a long summer), and grapefruits actually need the cold winter (well, chilly, not too many nights under freezing) in order to color up properly. For your climate, I'm betting that some form of satsuma mandarin would work, they are really cold hearty, and don't require too many hot days to sweeten up nicely (they're also ripe pretty early). It's going to be difficult to find a commercially grown mandarin that isn't on trifolate stock nowadays, especially as the typical alternative sour orange stock has been phased out pretty aggressively (and the replacement in California by four winds growers is cuban shaddock, and very cold intolerant)
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pogrmman
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:46 pm UTC

freezeblade wrote:
pogrmman wrote:Do you know if summer heat or a warm winter is more important for grapefruit? Also, I’ve been toying with the idea of growing some citrus. I’ve seen pictures of fruiting oranges, mandarins, and grapefruit in Charleston, SC (admittedly, done by a very skilled grower in a good microclimate) and they get more hard freezes than we do in the winter (~10 vs ~5). So, it is probably doable (there is the occasional yard with a mandarins or even grapefruit or oranges, but they’re not common). The tricky part, I think, is the speed at which we can alternate between warmth and cold in the winter — it’s not uncommon for a 70° day to be followed by a night at like 25° (so there isn’t necessarily much semi-dormancy). Also, it’s probably an issue that our thin, alkaline soils aren’t good for trifoliate orange rootstock... Do you have any tips/suggestions?.


The heat in summer is most important (along with a long summer), and grapefruits actually need the cold winter (well, chilly, not too many nights under freezing) in order to color up properly. For your climate, I'm betting that some form of satsuma mandarin would work, they are really cold hearty, and don't require too many hot days to sweeten up nicely (they're also ripe pretty early). It's going to be difficult to find a commercially grown mandarin that isn't on trifolate stock nowadays, especially as the typical alternative sour orange stock has been phased out pretty aggressively (and the replacement in California by four winds growers is cuban shaddock, and very cold intolerant)



I was thinking that satsumas would be easiest — my aunt has had a small satsuma for 3 years, and gotten fruit from it. I think the lost important factor is the earliness of the fruit — probably by mid-December, it will have gotten cold enough to damage the fruit.

I’m mostly just trying to expand my fruit options from the “p”s that normally do so well here — peaches, pears, pomegranates, persimmons, and “ph”igs. There is a suprising amount of more tropical stuff that does OK here — loquats are common (but sometimes don’t fruit), I’ve grown passionfruit successfully, gotten bananas to flower (too late, but I didn’t fertilize them), I’ve got edible ginger in the ground that comes back every year. I’m guessing citrus could do OK, especially in a warmer microclimate (like my house!).

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freezeblade
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby freezeblade » Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:51 pm UTC

Sour citrus might be doable as well, and can be very cold hearty. Here's a few more obscure citrus that may work for you:

Meyer Lemon - more cold hearty than regular lemons, who need a more Mediterranean climate, is otherwise a great replacement, grown and used extensively in California.

Yuzu - Japanese sour citrus, is awesome for cocktails and for marinade/baking applications. Very unique taste, ingredient in ponzu sauce.

Kishu Mandarin - Tiny ornamental mandarin (fruit no bigger than a golf ball, usually smaller), great taste, seedless.

Chinnito sour orange - Sometimes called myrtle leaf orange, very ornamental, small size, great for marinades and cocktails

kumquat hybrids are more cold hearty, and can produce great fruit outside of the range of the un-hybridized varities: Limequat (limes are notoriously cold-intolerant), Lemonquat, mandarinquat, Calamondin (naturally occuring hybrid, great in cocktails or a lime replacement in Philippine cuisine).
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