Coffee

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Re: Coffee

Postby sherbertfox » Mon Jan 07, 2008 4:10 am UTC

Ooooh.. Turkish coffee in Croatia, Monkey Bean or Illy black with three sugars, white hot chocolate with a shot of espresso, mocha from Carlton in town..... ahhh, happy times!
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Re: Coffee

Postby Midnight » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:22 pm UTC

i'm very much a fan of super dark roasts (caffiene or decaf doesn't matter to me, caffiene tastes a little better when it's that strong) but i need it sweetened with a ton of suger. arabian style, i've heard it called.. but they make like coffee/sugar syrup. mine just gets pretty darn sweet. but still super coffee-ish.
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Re: Coffee

Postby mosc » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:32 pm UTC

sounds like a glass of sugar water with some charcoal stirred in no offense.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Axman » Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:19 am UTC

Midnight wrote:i'm very much a fan of super dark roasts (caffiene or decaf doesn't matter to me, caffiene tastes a little better when it's that strong) but i need it sweetened with a ton of suger. arabian style, i've heard it called.. but they make like coffee/sugar syrup. mine just gets pretty darn sweet. but still super coffee-ish.


But North African/Middle Eastern coffees are roasted lightly. Dark doesn't make it stronger, using more coffee does.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Savoy_Truffle » Thu Jan 10, 2008 8:18 am UTC

Is it weird that I'm absolutely in love with the smell of coffee but can't actually stand drinking it? I feel like I'd be the ideal worker in a coffee shop -- happy to stay long hours but unwilling to take the free drinks :oops:
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Re: Coffee

Postby mosc » Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:34 pm UTC

Savoy_Truffle wrote:Is it weird that I'm absolutely in love with the smell of coffee but can't actually stand drinking it? I feel like I'd be the ideal worker in a coffee shop -- happy to stay long hours but unwilling to take the free drinks :oops:

This is quite common. I'd wager also that you like coffee ice cream? Probably enjoy your chocolate as well?
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Re: Coffee

Postby Kizyr » Fri Jan 11, 2008 7:23 pm UTC

Axman wrote:But North African/Middle Eastern coffees are roasted lightly. Dark doesn't make it stronger, using more coffee does.


It's weird how this is a real common misconception... Dark roasts just taste different. The taste is more distinctive, perhaps, but it doesn't really have much to do with strength.

Savoy_Truffle wrote:Is it weird that I'm absolutely in love with the smell of coffee but can't actually stand drinking it? I feel like I'd be the ideal worker in a coffee shop -- happy to stay long hours but unwilling to take the free drinks :oops:


Yes, this is actually a very common thing. I've known several people who say the same. KF
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:26 pm UTC

Kizyr wrote:It's weird how this is a real common misconception... Dark roasts just taste different. The taste is more distinctive, perhaps, but it doesn't really have much to do with strength.

I blame the coffee industry. I've actually seen coffee for sale with a strength printed on the packet. Darker roasts are labelled as being stronger.

Kizyr wrote:Yes, this is actually a very common thing. I've known several people who say the same. KF

I blame Starbucks. People drink the horrid, bitter liquid they serve and assume that that's what coffee tastes like.

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Re: Coffee

Postby tenohsix » Sat Jan 12, 2008 4:33 am UTC

Savoy_Truffle wrote:Is it weird that I'm absolutely in love with the smell of coffee but can't actually stand drinking it? I feel like I'd be the ideal worker in a coffee shop -- happy to stay long hours but unwilling to take the free drinks :oops:


I used to be like that, then I actually did work in a coffee shop. Now I love the stuff, to the point where it's pretty much a comfort food (comfort drink?) for me. It's just a matter of getting used to some degree of bitterness, really. (Though as Nath mentioned, I find that coffee from Starbucks is unnecessarily bitter. It doesn't have to be like that!)

Does anyone else really like the process of making coffee? I don't actually need the caffeine to wake up in the morning, but I'm really fond of having the ritual of measuring out the coffee, waiting for it to brew, and then sitting down with my mug and reading/checking email/whatever. It just doesn't feel like the day's started properly otherwise.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Midnight » Sun Jan 13, 2008 2:47 am UTC

Nath wrote:
Kizyr wrote:It's weird how this is a real common misconception... Dark roasts just taste different. The taste is more distinctive, perhaps, but it doesn't really have much to do with strength.

I blame the coffee industry. I've actually seen coffee for sale with a strength printed on the packet. Darker roasts are labelled as being stronger.

Kizyr wrote:Yes, this is actually a very common thing. I've known several people who say the same. KF

I blame Starbucks. People drink the horrid, bitter liquid they serve and assume that that's what coffee tastes like.



hey now. Hey.

I've had friends give me mysterious brews that were supposed to be the best kinds of coffee, the billion-bucks-a-bag kind of thing. And i've had starbucks... starbucks isn't as good, but it's not the swill of which you speak.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Sun Jan 13, 2008 3:56 am UTC

Midnight wrote:hey now. Hey.

I've had friends give me mysterious brews that were supposed to be the best kinds of coffee, the billion-bucks-a-bag kind of thing. And i've had starbucks... starbucks isn't as good, but it's not the swill of which you speak.

Perhaps Starbucks is an acquired taste. I have not acquired it. Their espresso is variable, but I've found their drip coffee consistently unenjoyable.

In any case, most of the drip coffee I've enjoyed wasn't billion-bucks-a-bag stuff. It was just regular, medium-roasted coffee, freshly ground, brewed, and drunk.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Kizyr » Sun Jan 13, 2008 5:20 pm UTC

Nath wrote:
Midnight wrote:hey now. Hey.
I've had friends give me mysterious brews that were supposed to be the best kinds of coffee, the billion-bucks-a-bag kind of thing. And i've had starbucks... starbucks isn't as good, but it's not the swill of which you speak.

Perhaps Starbucks is an acquired taste. I have not acquired it. Their espresso is variable, but I've found their drip coffee consistently unenjoyable.

I don't think I'd want to try their espresso. If a coffee shop's regular drip coffee is awful, it's a sure sign that everything else they have is going to be subpar (and yeah, I've tried enough Starbucks drinks to back up this opinion). Their regular drip coffee is atrocious; I might be sounding hyperbolic when I compare the taste to chocolate-covered charcoal, but that really is what it's like. It's almost consistently burnt, flat, over-roasted, or just plain bad.

I think I've had worse before, but only at gas stations and the like. (Although at some, the coffee's not that bad.)

Nath wrote:In any case, most of the drip coffee I've enjoyed wasn't billion-bucks-a-bag stuff. It was just regular, medium-roasted coffee, freshly ground, brewed, and drunk.

True; good coffee doesn't have to be expensive. Expensive coffee can be good, but you can still get really good coffee for the same price or less than you'd pay at Starbucks (by the cup, or by the bag). It's the same reason why tea doesn't have to be expensive to be really good. KF
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Re: Coffee

Postby MotorToad » Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:49 pm UTC

Midnight wrote:hey now. Hey.

I've had friends give me mysterious brews that were supposed to be the best kinds of coffee, the billion-bucks-a-bag kind of thing. And i've had starbucks... starbucks isn't as good, but it's not the swill of which you speak.
I only have *$ when I'm at Barnes & Noble reading early in the day. I think *$ may have eased the severity out of their house coffee because last time I was there it wasn't as bad as these others are saying. (And I shared their opinions a few years ago.) I'd still rather have coffee, though.

I do think that they spike the coffee with caffeine as I'll drink a pot of coffee some days and a 20 oz. cup of their stuff gives me shakes. Perhaps the "No-Doz in every cup" is why it's so bitter.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Mon Nov 02, 2009 12:50 am UTC

(Bumping this ancient thread because it's more general than the 'how much coffee...' thread.)

I have a new favorite way to brew coffee. Microwave a large mug of water to a bit below boiling, add coarse grounds, stir and cover, wait 3-5 minutes, and strain (I used a wire strainer and a paper filter). French-press-style coffee without having to get a French press. The coffee was much richer than the stuff that comes out of my drip machine, and there's less cleanup. Also, it's almost exactly how I brew tea, except that I use cooler water for coffee.

MotorToad wrote:I only have *$ when I'm at Barnes & Noble reading early in the day. I think *$ may have eased the severity out of their house coffee because last time I was there it wasn't as bad as these others are saying. (And I shared their opinions a few years ago.) I'd still rather have coffee, though.

You know, I've had a couple of cups of Starbucks at airports over the past year, and they are indeed more drinkable than I remember. Still compare unfavorably with home-made stuff, and most other coffee shops, for that matter, but definitely an improvement.

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Re: Coffee

Postby voidPtr » Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:07 am UTC

I love coffee. In general my favourite is dark, thick, and sweet, but I love it in all it's forms. True coffee afficionados will grimace, but at my coffee drinking peak I used to drink 4-5 Maxim instant coffee packets premixed with coffee whitener and sugar. At the time, I didn't really have the option to drink anything else, but I still enjoyed them.

These days, I worry about my health a bit and don't drink coffee like I used to, and very rarely put anything in it other than milk. In the morning, I usually make a cappucino or cafe au lait, or iif I'm in a hurry, I'll run the espresso long and put it in my travelmug. At work, sometime throughout the day, I' filll my mug with typical take-out coffee and if available, I get half-decaf. Instead of buying take-out coffee all the time, I''m considering getting a french press and brewing it with condensed milk instead, or maybe even going back to those maxim packets once in a blue moon.

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Re: Coffee

Postby poxic » Mon Nov 02, 2009 3:22 am UTC

There was a time when instant coffee was cost- (and space-) efficient. I learned to kinda like it for what it was -- not as a substitute for real coffee, but as a sometimes-pleasant caffeinated drink of its own.

I haven't enjoyed the instant stuff for some time now, mostly because I don't have to. :wink: I have found my tastes mellowing, though. The really dark stuff doesn't do it for me anymore, maybe partly because caffeine irritates my stomach now (getting old sucks, have I mentioned that?).
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Re: Coffee

Postby Midnight » Mon Nov 02, 2009 4:26 am UTC

Coming back with a year and a half more coffee drinking under my belt.

You guys are right. Starbuck's drip coffee is terrible. BUT their icy sweet coffee drinks are Still Delicious, as are said drinks in the supermarket-sold glass bottles.

By the way that was indeed an EPIC necro. Like, what, 21 months?
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Re: Coffee

Postby psychosomaticism » Sun Jan 10, 2010 10:03 pm UTC

*Gives coffee thread a cup of coffee in order to talk about coffee some more*

How about vacuum coffee makers? Anyone used one of those? I'm trying to find a really excellent way to make coffee that isn't the french press, as I've read a lot (albeit a lot of conflicting) info on health effects of unfiltered coffee (see: cafestol), and I don't really like chewing the grounds of a french press cup. Vacuum makers look really cool, and it would be cool to do science to my brew, but I've never known anyone who used one.

Also, how about specific bean companies you like? I'm fond of Kicking Horse m'self.

Kizyr wrote:
Axman wrote:But North African/Middle Eastern coffees are roasted lightly. Dark doesn't make it stronger, using more coffee does.


It's weird how this is a real common misconception... Dark roasts just taste different. The taste is more distinctive, perhaps, but it doesn't really have much to do with strength.


I go dark for the more distinct taste, and I rest easy now that I know there isn't much difference in caffeine content across roasts. I had a teacher that said that caffeine being removed by roasting time is silly, because caffeine breaks down well over the temperature needed for roasting.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:03 am UTC

psychosomaticism wrote:How about vacuum coffee makers? Anyone used one of those? I'm trying to find a really excellent way to make coffee that isn't the french press, as I've read a lot (albeit a lot of conflicting) info on health effects of unfiltered coffee (see: cafestol), and I don't really like chewing the grounds of a french press cup. Vacuum makers look really cool, and it would be cool to do science to my brew, but I've never known anyone who used one.

I haven't tried a vacuum brewer, but if this page is to be believed, it probably isn't for me. I like a robust cup of coffee, and might find vacuum brew a bit weak. However, I don't have a French press, for the same reasons as you. I've had good results brewing coffee directly in a pot of hot water, and then filtering it with paper and a wire strainer. More recently, I've been using a manual drip cone, because it's more convenient. I do need to take a few extra steps to keep it from coming out too thin, though.

psychosomaticism wrote:I go dark for the more distinct taste, and I rest easy now that I know there isn't much difference in caffeine content across roasts. I had a teacher that said that caffeine being removed by roasting time is silly, because caffeine breaks down well over the temperature needed for roasting.

Apparently, darker roasts have more caffeine by weight, but less by volume. Explained here.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Decker » Mon Jan 11, 2010 3:47 pm UTC

As someone who like coffee flavored drinks, but not straight coffee, I've heard good things about cold brewing. Evidently, you mix together the coffee grounds and water and then stick it in the fridge for 12 hours (About a 4 to 1 ratio of water to coffee). Then you take it and run it through a fine filter and that gives you kind of a concentrate. You can dilute it with water or milk or just drink it like that. From what I heard, it's supposed to remove a lot of the acid and bitternes from the coffee, but it still keeps the flavor.
Has anyone tried this? What's your opinion?
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Mon Jan 11, 2010 10:09 pm UTC

I tried it a couple of years ago. It wasn't bad, but I prefer it hot brewed. Most of the bitterness can be avoided with reasonable beans and suitable roasting, grinding and brewing methods. I don't mind the acidity so much, but that can be controlled to some extent too. (Though some of the variables, such as roast level, might be a trade off between acidity and bitterness.)

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Re: Coffee

Postby MotorToad » Mon Jan 11, 2010 10:46 pm UTC

Bitterness is usually from being brewed too weak than too strong, especially with brands that come in 3+ lb cans.
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Re: Coffee

Postby psychosomaticism » Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:20 am UTC

MotorToad wrote:Bitterness is usually from being brewed too weak than too strong, especially with brands that come in 3+ lb cans.


Bleh. 3 lb tins of pre-ground dreck is almost not worth drinking (I still do if it's offered, though). I mean, I don't much consider myself an aficionado of coffee, but it's similar to the difference between cheap hobo wine and a good merlot.

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Re: Coffee

Postby J the Ninja » Tue Jan 12, 2010 7:58 am UTC

As I recall, cold press is basically like french press, except instead of using near-boiling water and letting it steep on the counter for a bit (I do it for 4 mins), you use cold water and let it steep in the fridge overnight. I personally find french pressing to be much sweeter than other brewing methods (one of the main reasons I like it. That and the pots are cheap and easy to clean), so I could believe it being sweeter than most. Also, french pressed tends to get bitter if you steep it too long, so that might be a problem for cold press too.
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Re: Coffee

Postby dubsola » Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:35 pm UTC

psychosomaticism wrote:Also, how about specific bean companies you like? I'm fond of Kicking Horse m'self.

I do coffee a different way. It's a bit snobbish I know, but I really like good coffee. I go to Monmouth.

Monmouth are a smallish company in London that source unroasted beans from fairtrade organic growers around the world. When they come across a new grower, they'll fly to that coffee estate to see how it's all made - the idea being that both the quality is there but also that everything is fair, good working conditions and so on. They buy a quantity of unroasted beans and roast it in their own roasting plant.

They sell both beans and cups of coffee at their stores, and the quality shows - most people I've taken there say it's one of the best cups they've had. If I want coffee for home, the barista will make me a few small cups made from various estates, I'll pick one and ask them to grind it for however I plan to make it. At home I have a small espresson machine and one of those filter things that sit on the cup. I quite like the results with the filter.

Coffee is so easy to get wrong - bad beans, bad roast (I always find supermarket coffee to be 'burnt'), poor grinding, water too hot, milk too hot (if you're frothing the milk) - but when it's right it's so good that I think it's worth paying for it (I pay about £5 for 250grams). I'll drink instant if there's nothing else, that's fine, but good coffee is a joy.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Vohu Manah » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:53 am UTC

dubsola wrote:They sell both beans and cups of coffee at their stores, and the quality shows - most people I've taken there say it's one of the best cups they've had. If I want coffee for home, the barista will make me a few small cups made from various estates, I'll pick one and ask them to grind it for however I plan to make it. At home I have a small espresson machine and one of those filter things that sit on the cup. I quite like the results with the filter.

Coffee is so easy to get wrong - bad beans, bad roast (I always find supermarket coffee to be 'burnt'), poor grinding, water too hot, milk too hot (if you're frothing the milk) - but when it's right it's so good that I think it's worth paying for it (I pay about £5 for 250grams). I'll drink instant if there's nothing else, that's fine, but good coffee is a joy.

So you don't grind your own? Isn't that like buying a Ferrari and putting wooden wheels on it? Bean freshness is one of the most important parts of a good coffee, and pre-ground goes stale extremely quickly. I've been using ground coffee for the past week due to a grinder issue, and there's a definite taste difference.
I've had a slight epiphany over the last little while; I've evolved from a steam toy and a spin grinder (make convenient, real tasting espresso that tastes like *$'s demon step-child!) to a pump machine and a ceramic burr grinder. I can actually drink my espresso without frothing milk to make it palatable.
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Re: Coffee

Postby MotorToad » Wed Jan 13, 2010 6:00 am UTC

According to Alton Brown (AKA "god"), it's much more important that the beans are ground by a grinder than being ground that day vs. two weeks ago. So long as you're not using coffee that was ground five months ago in a rat-infested plant in Guatemala. I.e. given a choice between fresh beans ground to consistent size a week ago and beans chopped up this morning into a powdery mess by a blender blade, choose the ground beans.
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Re: Coffee

Postby J the Ninja » Wed Jan 13, 2010 6:56 am UTC

MotorToad wrote:According to Alton Brown (AKA "god"), it's much more important that the beans are ground by a grinder than being ground that day vs. two weeks ago. So long as you're not using coffee that was ground five months ago in a rat-infested plant in Guatemala. I.e. given a choice between fresh beans ground to consistent size a week ago and beans chopped up this morning into a powdery mess by a blender blade, choose the ground beans.


For my own experience, I can definitely recommend having them pre-ground at the coffee shop if you don't have your own burr grinder. Blade grinders screw things up a lot more than freshness does. Of course, grinding fresh in your own burr grinder is best, but they run about $100 last I checked, and that's not exactly a small amount of money to drop on coffee paraphernalia.
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Re: Coffee

Postby dubsola » Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:45 am UTC

Vohu Manah wrote:So you don't grind your own? Isn't that like buying a Ferrari and putting wooden wheels on it? Bean freshness is one of the most important parts of a good coffee, and pre-ground goes stale extremely quickly. I've been using ground coffee for the past week due to a grinder issue, and there's a definite taste difference.

Yeah, you're absolutely right - I'd prefer to grind it myself with a good grinder, it's just that I don't have one. There is a noticeable difference between the end of a bag and the start of a fresh one. It still tastes pretty good though - far better than supermarket coffee.

The reason I don't have one:
J the Ninja wrote:Blade grinders screw things up a lot more than freshness does. Of course, grinding fresh in your own burr grinder is best, but they run about $100 last I checked, and that's not exactly a small amount of money to drop on coffee paraphernalia.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Wed Jan 13, 2010 1:27 pm UTC

J the Ninja wrote:For my own experience, I can definitely recommend having them pre-ground at the coffee shop if you don't have your own burr grinder. Blade grinders screw things up a lot more than freshness does. Of course, grinding fresh in your own burr grinder is best, but they run about $100 last I checked, and that's not exactly a small amount of money to drop on coffee paraphernalia.

My experience has been the opposite. Depending on your brewing method, you might be able to get away with a blade grinder. It won't work for espresso, and it'll make your French press gritty, but it works fine for drip. I've had particularly good results with manual drip; the fine particles are OK because of the short exposure time, and the coarse particles just mean I have to use more grounds to avoid a boring cup. But staleness really kills it. Even with whole beans, a freshly bought batch of coffee tastes a lot better than stuff that's been sitting around for a couple of weeks.

Has anyone tried manual burr grinders? They are cheap and apparently have decent grind quality, if you're willing to put in the time.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Kizyr » Wed Jan 13, 2010 4:20 pm UTC

I had coffee at a Vietnamese place the other day, at this tiny family-run pho restaurant in Richmond.

...it was the best restaurant coffee I'd ever had in my life. Sweet and with the right amount of cinnamon and other spices in it.

All coffee should strive to be that good. KF
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Re: Coffee

Postby J the Ninja » Wed Jan 13, 2010 7:24 pm UTC

Nath wrote:
J the Ninja wrote:For my own experience, I can definitely recommend having them pre-ground at the coffee shop if you don't have your own burr grinder. Blade grinders screw things up a lot more than freshness does. Of course, grinding fresh in your own burr grinder is best, but they run about $100 last I checked, and that's not exactly a small amount of money to drop on coffee paraphernalia.

My experience has been the opposite. Depending on your brewing method, you might be able to get away with a blade grinder. It won't work for espresso, and it'll make your French press gritty, but it works fine for drip. I've had particularly good results with manual drip; the fine particles are OK because of the short exposure time, and the coarse particles just mean I have to use more grounds to avoid a boring cup. But staleness really kills it. Even with whole beans, a freshly bought batch of coffee tastes a lot better than stuff that's been sitting around for a couple of weeks.

Has anyone tried manual burr grinders? They are cheap and apparently have decent grind quality, if you're willing to put in the time.


I use french press when I'm fixing some at home, so no blade grinder = no go for me. You probably have point, in that the burr-grinder-at-the-store vs blade-grinder-at-home is dependent on how you are brewing.
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Nath
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Thu Jan 14, 2010 3:06 am UTC

J the Ninja wrote:I use french press when I'm fixing some at home, so no blade grinder = no go for me.

Ah, yeah. Fond as I am of French presses, you'd probably have better results with a blade grinder and drip cone than a French press and week-old grounds. And for <$7, the cone isn't much of an investment. Though it'll probably take a couple of attempts to get the dosage and grind level dialed in to your liking.

Kizyr wrote:I had coffee at a Vietnamese place the other day, at this tiny family-run pho restaurant in Richmond.

...it was the best restaurant coffee I'd ever had in my life. Sweet and with the right amount of cinnamon and other spices in it.

Really? I like Vietnamese coffee, but I don't think I've ever had it with spices. And based on my experience with Trader Joe's spiced 'holiday blend' or some such, I'd have thought 'the right amount of spices' would be 'none at all'.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Vohu Manah » Thu Jan 14, 2010 4:47 am UTC

Nath wrote:Has anyone tried manual burr grinders? They are cheap and apparently have decent grind quality, if you're willing to put in the time.

Funny-I just got one today. It has a different taste than most grinders, with a slightly fruity flavor. I wouldn't say manual grinders are that time-consuming though; it only takes me about 1.5 minutes to grind enough for two shots of espresso.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:37 am UTC

Cool. It's interesting that the grinder actually changed the flavor profile. What sort of grinder were you using before? Were you grinding to a similar consistency?

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Re: Coffee

Postby dubsola » Thu Jan 14, 2010 11:05 am UTC

Nath wrote:
Kizyr wrote:I had coffee at a Vietnamese place the other day, at this tiny family-run pho restaurant in Richmond.

...it was the best restaurant coffee I'd ever had in my life. Sweet and with the right amount of cinnamon and other spices in it.

Really? I like Vietnamese coffee, but I don't think I've ever had it with spices. And based on my experience with Trader Joe's spiced 'holiday blend' or some such, I'd have thought 'the right amount of spices' would be 'none at all'.

I have. Well, I'm not sure if they added spices or if it was the flavour of the coffee, but it certainly did have *something*. I generally don't like flavoured coffee but this was pretty good.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Faust06 » Thu Jan 14, 2010 9:49 pm UTC

I'm a fiend for straight-up quality coffee. Unfortunately, it makes me feel like an aristocrat elitist jazz-freak douche. I'm not above ordering "fancy" drinks, but I usually find them too damn sweet (so I tend to stick with unflavored cappucino/latte in such a case).

Well, I'm not sure if they added spices or if it was the flavour of the coffee, but it certainly did have *something*. I generally don't like flavoured coffee but this was pretty good.


You'd be surprised at the hint of flavors coffee beans can capture. But if it's spice, it's probably added. Love spices as well.

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Re: Coffee

Postby Vohu Manah » Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:49 am UTC

Nath wrote:Cool. It's interesting that the grinder actually changed the flavor profile. What sort of grinder were you using before? Were you grinding to a similar consistency?

I, unfortunately, didn't find out about the importance of a grinder in the beginning, so I ended up with a simple and basic entry-level burr grinder. It didn't produce anything acceptable for espresso, so I got a hand grinder. Fineness is still a work in progress until I get it dialed in, so I don't have much to say on that front.

Faust06 wrote:I'm a fiend for straight-up quality coffee. Unfortunately, it makes me feel like an aristocrat elitist jazz-freak douche. I'm not above ordering "fancy" drinks, but I usually find them too damn sweet (so I tend to stick with unflavored cappucino/latte in such a case)..

Oh, you could be much worse...much worse. You can't be an elitist until you have a La Marzocco (plumbed-in, of course) two-group, a doser-less and step-less Super Jolly with ACF cups and a specialty 58mm tamper, combined with your own stash of green coffee and a home roaster, to enjoy when you aren't cupping or attending tamper roadshows.
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Sat Jan 16, 2010 1:26 am UTC

You know, it just struck me that a manual grinder might be a good option for brewing coffee at work, without having to make a racket or use pre-ground beans. Which one did you get?

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Re: Coffee

Postby Vohu Manah » Tue Jan 19, 2010 3:01 am UTC

Nath wrote:You know, it just struck me that a manual grinder might be a good option for brewing coffee at work, without having to make a racket or use pre-ground beans. Which one did you get?

Sorry for the delayed reply; I got the Kyocera from Orhpan Espresso. I am getting good results from it, but I don't know how well this grinder would work for something other than espresso or Turkish, as manual grinders tend to have problems with coarser grinds. This one has a mechanism to improve coarse grind quality, but you still don't quite get the evenness expected from an expensive electric grinder, although hand grinders will produce fine grinds comparable to a $500 Mazzer . However, when compared to pre-ground coffee or a cheap electric model, most hand grinders will be an improvement.

Edit: A note about the Kyocera: That site is the only one I've found it at, as that item has to be imported from Japan. When you buy, it comes with Japanese instructions and packaging.
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