Coffee

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dubsola
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Re: Coffee

Postby dubsola » Fri Jul 18, 2014 4:05 am UTC

Nath wrote:Still, it's not ridiculous for someone to switch from a manual grinder to, say, a cheap automatic grinder (even a blade grinder). Grind quality would suffer, but not everybody wants to spend two minutes in the morning rotating a crank for their coffee. Pretty small fraction of the population, I'd guess.

I went blade grinder -> manual -> basic automatic burr grinder (Bodum Bistro), and I quite like the convenience of my current set-up, even though I didn't mind the manual when it was my main grinder.

I have a hand mill at work (the Hario Skerton) and I get a lot of stick from it. A lot of 'why bother? We have the Nestle capsule thing, just use that'. Also, the pour over. Most people have never seen one before.

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Nath
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Fri Jul 18, 2014 4:43 am UTC

dubsola wrote:I have a hand mill at work (the Hario Skerton) and I get a lot of stick from it. A lot of 'why bother? We have the Nestle capsule thing, just use that'. Also, the pour over. Most people have never seen one before.

I use my hand mill at work, too. I use it in the coffee room, which also contains a professional-grade (but consistently miscalibrated) grinder and espresso machine. Whenever anyone comes in and sees me fiddling with my hand grinder and Clever dripper, they give me a Flowers for Algernon look and go about their business.

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freezeblade
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Re: Coffee

Postby freezeblade » Fri Jul 25, 2014 6:26 pm UTC

Nath wrote:
dubsola wrote:I have a hand mill at work (the Hario Skerton) and I get a lot of stick from it. A lot of 'why bother? We have the Nestle capsule thing, just use that'. Also, the pour over. Most people have never seen one before.

I use my hand mill at work, too. I use it in the coffee room, which also contains a professional-grade (but consistently miscalibrated) grinder and espresso machine. Whenever anyone comes in and sees me fiddling with my hand grinder and Clever dripper, they give me a Flowers for Algernon look and go about their business.


I laughed at the Flowers for Algernon reference. I wish we had a espresso machine at work, we have this terrible electric auto-drip thing (curtis concourse) with pre-ground individually packaged grounds that provide "just the right amount" of coffee and grind specificly for that machine. The grounds are stale, over-roasted, and terrible, and make rubbish coffee. I bring tea bags and use the hot water spout from the machine, and have to explain to everyone why I'm strange, and won't drink the coffee.
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pogrmman
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Re: Coffee

Postby pogrmman » Sat Oct 08, 2016 6:16 pm UTC

I know this is a totally dead post that I'm replying to, but I didn't want to start a new coffee thread.

This morning, I had the best pourover I've ever made. I used the Wave and an Ethiopian coffee from Klatch.
It was super good -- sweet and complex with well defined flavors. I'd put it at the same quality as one of my favorite shops back home.
Compared to my brew attempts with the V60 at home, which weren't great, the Wave is excellent!

So, what is your favorite method for brewed coffee? What kinds of coffee do you like?
Mine is definitely the Kalita Wave. I personally love African coffees, but I've had some very good Central/South American ones as well. I'm not the biggest fan of the Southeast Asian coffees. Natural processed coffees are my favorite -- they can be variable, but when they're good, they tend to be great.

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doogly
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Re: Coffee

Postby doogly » Wed Oct 12, 2016 6:13 pm UTC

I like the Ethiopian folks very much. But I generally go with the Market Basket house blend. They do good work.

For home I use one of the Bialetti mukka pots. Delightful stuff.
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Nath
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Re: Coffee

Postby Nath » Thu Oct 13, 2016 7:42 am UTC

Nowadays I mostly use an Aeropress, or the espresso machine at work. Sometimes I feel like a pour-over, and break out the little plastic Melitta I used through grad school. I haven't found any of the pour-over methods to be consistently better than any of the others. There are so many factors that affect how good a cup of coffee turns out (grind, dosage, water temp, choice of beans, roast age, brewing technique) that the small variation between a properly made Melitta cup and a properly made Hario V60 cup (for instance) gets drowned out in the noise. However, I do have one of those Clever brewers (pour over with a valve), and I haven't found a brewing technique that gives me a cup I really like yet.

As for choice of beans, central and some south American wet-processed coffee tastes most 'coffee-like', so if I just want to drink and enjoy a cup of coffee without thinking about it too much, that's probably what I'd go for. I do enjoy many African coffees, both wet and dry process, though sometimes I find them a bit too acidic. I find some SE Asian coffees a little... musty. That can be interesting, and enjoyable sometimes, but it's usually not the first thing I'll think to order.

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pogrmman
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Re: Coffee

Postby pogrmman » Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:15 pm UTC

Nath wrote:Nowadays I mostly use an Aeropress, or the espresso machine at work. Sometimes I feel like a pour-over, and break out the little plastic Melitta I used through grad school. I haven't found any of the pour-over methods to be consistently better than any of the others. There are so many factors that affect how good a cup of coffee turns out (grind, dosage, water temp, choice of beans, roast age, brewing technique) that the small variation between a properly made Melitta cup and a properly made Hario V60 cup (for instance) gets drowned out in the noise. However, I do have one of those Clever brewers (pour over with a valve), and I haven't found a brewing technique that gives me a cup I really like yet.

As for choice of beans, central and some south American wet-processed coffee tastes most 'coffee-like', so if I just want to drink and enjoy a cup of coffee without thinking about it too much, that's probably what I'd go for. I do enjoy many African coffees, both wet and dry process, though sometimes I find them a bit too acidic. I find some SE Asian coffees a little... musty. That can be interesting, and enjoyable sometimes, but it's usually not the first thing I'll think to order.


I find that the wave is easier to get consistency with than the V60. I noticed a huge difference when I made the switch.

I've found the clever is pretty consistent. I use a slightly coarser grind than for pourover and let it steep for around 3-4 minutes I think? It's been a while since I did it, but it is more consistent and easier to dial in than a pourover in my experience.

I agree that SE Asian coffees can be "musty" -- I'm not a huge fan. They can still be good, but African and Central American ones tend to be better.

I tend to prefer the more acidic coffees -- but I do agree that some Africans (especially Kenyans) can be too acidic. I got home and am making espresso with a natural Ethiopian -- it makes a great latte -- good blueberry flavor on the end. I just love the fruit/berry notes -- which is why I like Africans.

Central and South American coffees are good -- lots of them have a really good sweetness and a lot of the "darker" notes like chocolate.

I generally prefer natural coffees to washed ones. I'm not a big fan of the inconsistency, but when they're good, they're really good -- from all the growing regions. Some of my all time favorites have been natural processed ones from Panama and Brazil. Honey processed are good, but not quite as spectacular. I just like all coffee in general...

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pogrmman
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Re: Coffee

Postby pogrmman » Fri Nov 04, 2016 5:04 pm UTC

Speaking of Central American coffees, I'm drinking a fantastic Guatemalan right now -- it's really sweet and appley. The sugar notes are like creme brûlée. It's not perfect (because my grinder isn't great), but it's still an excellent coffee.


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