Who likes BREAD?

Apparently, people like to eat.

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pogrmman
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby pogrmman » Thu Mar 16, 2017 7:09 pm UTC

freezeblade wrote:I'm of the mind that the location only matters a little, and that it's really in how you maintain the starter (what kind of flour, how often you feed it, what hydration, etc.). The concept of how starters change when they move is a very contentious subject.

Shoot me a PM and I can answer any questions you've got the best I can. If you'd like a chunk of my starter, I can provide it as well, it's at least 20 years old, got it from a one-legged, red headed, irish, homebrewer friend of the family about 10 years ago, and has never failed me!


Yep -- the maitnence of it matters a lot more than the location. Having started two different starters with the same method, the taste is fairly similar.

They do differ some though. Probably because I started them with different flours (that have different microbes on them).

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Liri » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:02 pm UTC

Am I allowed to dislike sourdough?

I dislike sourdough.
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freezeblade
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:08 pm UTC

Is the only sourdough you've had is "sf style sourdough" ? Because that is quite sour, but not all sourdough has to be "sour" persay, which is why I prefer the term "naturally levianed." If you feed your sourdough culture often (less than 10 hours between), and keep it a stiff starter (50% hydration ish), then you've got an "italian sweet starter" which actually smells sweet! and is usually used for pan d'oro, or panettone, both very non-sour sweet breads!
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Liri » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:14 pm UTC

I've had a lot of bread. The cut-off for "too sour" is well below sf style for me, though. I'll try using an Italian sweet starter next time, thanks!

The bakery of the local co-op honestly has the best bread I've ever eaten. Their baguettes and baguette-style breads, especially.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:34 pm UTC

http://www.sfbi.com/maintaining-an-italian-starter.html

is a great little blurb on this style of starter. When I plan on using a sweet starter for one of the aforementioned breads, I pull a piece of my starter off of the mother, then feed it as noted for about 2 days, the only pause in the feed is at night, where it has about 6-7 hours between. I keep the starter small (smaller than 100g) during these periods, or the amount of cast-off starter gets too unwieldy. I keep the cast off percentage in a container in the fridge until it's enough to bake a pain au levian with them in the meantime.
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pogrmman
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby pogrmman » Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:06 pm UTC

Firm starters are the best!

I find that I usually don't get a super sour result with them, but instead a nice, complex flavor.
Also, I think they are easier to maintain.

On another note, I'm a college student, and it turns out the dining hall won't be open for dinner (because of spring break), so I tossed together the cheapest OK tasting thing I could -- a loaf of bread. IDK how it will turn out, because I'm using more yeast than normal and forgoing a super long fermentation (I normally preferment around 70% of the flour in an overnight poolish and add no additional yeast for my yeasted bread).

I'm doing something like 50% white, 50% wheat, 85% ish water (I started at 75% like I'd do for white, but had to keep adding more), 2.5% salt, 2% yeast.

I probably won't get to eat until late, but that's OK.

EDIT: Ugh. I should've added more water. It's stiffer than I like, but oh well. That's what I get for pulling a recepie out of my ass.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Fri Mar 17, 2017 10:50 pm UTC

On such short baking windows, I have a tendency to do enriched breads instead. Any lean doughs that are baked in less than 4 hours from flour hitting the water always seems bland to me, need some fat and sugar to round them out. My go-to is a vienna bread, which adds 4-5% fat/sugar and some milk solids.
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pogrmman
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby pogrmman » Fri Mar 17, 2017 11:57 pm UTC

freezeblade wrote:On such short baking windows, I have a tendency to do enriched breads instead. Any lean doughs that are baked in less than 4 hours from flour hitting the water always seems bland to me, need some fat and sugar to round them out. My go-to is a vienna bread, which adds 4-5% fat/sugar and some milk solids.


I would, but I didn't have anything else on hand. Plus, it's probably going to be more like 5 hrs.

That's another reason I used 50% whole wheat -- so it's not as bland despite a short fermentation. It actually smells pretty nice right now.

It's not ideal, but I think it will turn out ok.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby sardia » Sat Mar 25, 2017 10:03 pm UTC

freezeblade wrote:
KnightExemplar wrote:Another advantage: the various "breads" are an excellent "sink" for various kitchen ingredients. Your base is (leavening: either baking powder or yeast) + Flour. If you got spare Yogurt, make biscuits. If you got spare Pesto, bake it in. If you don't got spare anything, just make white bread. With some thought, you can clear out your pantry by simply mixing your less commonly used ingredients with the "bread base".


I love this aspect of bread baking. Extra citrus that need to be used? zest them for wonderful sweet breakfast toast bread. made chicken stock recently? skim the schmaltz on top to put into a multi-grain harvest bread. Extra oatmeal left over from the morning? toss 'em in! Eggs nearing the end of life in the fridge? eggy challah! etc.

For veggies and meat scraps, I use pizza for the same purpose.

I have left excess white pepper, tarragon, and poultry seasoning. What does that turn into? Other than a base for chicken stew or maybe white gravy.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Sun Mar 26, 2017 2:33 am UTC

A sauce bernaise? Over roasted chicken thighs?
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Aura » Fri Apr 28, 2017 2:33 am UTC

I love bread- I don't know if you all have heard of No-Knead Bread before? https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/113 ... nead-bread It's very easy and makes amazing bread.

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pogrmman
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby pogrmman » Fri Apr 28, 2017 6:20 pm UTC

Aura wrote:I love bread- I don't know if you all have heard of No-Knead Bread before? https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/113 ... nead-bread It's very easy and makes amazing bread.


I have, but I don't use no-knead recipes. I find I get a better result with kneading followed by a few stretches and folds during bulk ferment. It's not that much more labor intensive to develop the gluten somewhat in a kneading step (even for super wet doughs).


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