Who likes BREAD?

Apparently, people like to eat.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Mar 17, 2010 4:49 pm UTC

Ask the bakery person. In the US it's required to have that info available, if not on every item sold at retail. When one of my favorite regional bakeries sold out to a bigger concern, they not only dropped my favorite loaves altogether, the new ones they introduced had more sugars and less crust and texture. I stopped buying them.
I should be making my own breads, but I have a hard time getting excited about a batch of two or three loaves, I mean, doing 20 doesn't really take more time, if you have the oven space, and the mixer.......(not to mention that I try not to eat too much bread in general.)
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby dubsola » Tue Jun 14, 2011 11:37 am UTC

I'm making chapattis right now. But my intention is to learn how to make bread of all kinds - I want to start with a simple farmhouse loaf. There are loads of recipes out there and all of them seem quite simple, and I'd imagine it probably is simple, given that people have been making bread for quite some time. But I has questions:

What's the difference between fresh and dried yeast?
Is oven temp particularly important to be exact? My oven's dial has no numbers, do I need to buy an oven thermostat? I will, but in the meantime can I go ahead and make bread anyway?

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Nath » Tue Jun 14, 2011 2:11 pm UTC

dubsola wrote:What's the difference between fresh and dried yeast?
Is oven temp particularly important to be exact? My oven's dial has no numbers, do I need to buy an oven thermostat? I will, but in the meantime can I go ahead and make bread anyway?

For a second I thought these questions were in connection to the chapatis, and I was quite confused.

People have been making bread for longer than they've had thermostats, so I'd go for it, if you're up for a bit of trial and error. I've successfully modified bread recipes before (e.g. halving the quantities and experimenting with baking time), and I'm no baker.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby dubsola » Tue Jun 14, 2011 2:20 pm UTC

Nope, I kicked off with chapattis because I was actually making them, the first bread-like thing I've ever tried, and you'll be pleased to hear they turned out quite well. They are really, really easy.

And I think you may be right about the temperature. I just need to work out what sort of yeast to buy and then I'm good to go, I think.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Nath » Wed Jun 15, 2011 2:20 am UTC

dubsola wrote:Nope, I kicked off with chapattis because I was actually making them, the first bread-like thing I've ever tried, and you'll be pleased to hear they turned out quite well. They are really, really easy.

Yeah; I'm always confused by how complicated people make tortillas, when chapattis are basically the same thing made with two ingredients and a heat source.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Zohar » Wed Jun 15, 2011 11:13 am UTC

You can use any type of yeast, it just changes how you use them specifically. Normally dry yeast rise less, but are less prone to fail, if I recall correctly. As for heat, I got an oven thermometer for fairly cheap which is very useful.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Wed Jun 15, 2011 3:13 pm UTC

I made a recipe from our Sunset Breads book, which has had some really neat recipes, called Los Angeles Peda Bread. Here's the recipe on a blag; I made the whole wheat variant which is 2.5c AP and 2.5c WW flour, with 0.5c your choice of bran/germ/flaxmeal thrown in for good measure. I also did an extra coat of the glaze to hold a sprinkling of poppyseeds.

I think if I were to make this again I might try an egg glaze before baking to get a nicer color, and bread flour instead of AP as used in the linked blag. The rise after forming the loaves was not very good so I might not have been gentle enough. The end result was almost reminiscent of a pretzel in taste and texture; the former no doubt because the dough is fairly salty, the latter likely because of my rush in shaping the loaves. I was hoping for a lighter loaf with a more distinct crust.

Definitely going to make it again, though. It's just so pretty!
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Jun 16, 2011 11:35 am UTC

CRAP. my whole thing on yeasties was eaten by the iPad. Go read Rhulman, at Rhulman.com on yeast. He's doing a month of stuff about bread, or did a month of bread at sometime, and he really knows how to explain this stuff.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby dubsola » Thu Jun 16, 2011 12:38 pm UTC

I actually already came across that site, and thought it looked pretty good. Will try to find the yeast article. Thanks, despite your lack of thing on yeasties this does help me.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Thu Jun 16, 2011 11:39 pm UTC

I just read his blog article on the Cookulus app. Awesome!
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Jul 08, 2011 1:04 am UTC

Decided to actually bake some cibatta as my loaf od sourdough is almost gone. Some thing about the tiny amounts needed to make just enough bread for one loaf makes me giggle. It will be so cute!
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby clockworkmonk » Mon Jul 11, 2011 4:11 pm UTC

so, I just picked up a sourdough starter. Now what?
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Jul 11, 2011 4:38 pm UTC

Is it in powder or is it a gooey mass? If it's powder, follow the directions on the package and wait about a week. If it's an already growing culture, feed it a few times, then make bread. There are loads of sourdough recipies available, or I could type one out for you.
To feed the starter add 1/2 cup each of unbleached flour and water to it and stir well. Then let it sit, loosely covered, at room temp for 12-24 hours. It should bubble up and expand. Stir it well and stick it in the fridge until you use it. I find it easiest to mix just with my hand. I do wear a latex glove, but it's much faster than a spoon as well as easier to clean up.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby clockworkmonk » Mon Jul 11, 2011 5:16 pm UTC

its a gooey mess. I took some of my dad's starter when I visited him. just need a solid recipe to get a good starting point the number of recipes is the problem, as I have no idea of the quality of any of them.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Ulc » Mon Jul 11, 2011 5:23 pm UTC

The best sourdough (long since dead, had to kill it with fire when he took over the refrigerator and styled himself king!) I ever made was started on a equal mixture of all-grain wheat flour, finely ground wheat flour, water and Greek yoghurt, and a little bit of a friends sourdough. Stir that together, and let it sit outside for about 24 hour, loosely covered - then close it tight in a much larger container*.

Then feed it a mixture of all-grain wheat flour and normal flour once per week, if you're not baking.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Jul 12, 2011 8:56 pm UTC

clockworkmonk wrote:its a gooey mess. I took some of my dad's starter when I visited him. just need a solid recipe to get a good starting point the number of recipes is the problem, as I have no idea of the quality of any of them.

Peter reihart has several good baking books out there, also Bread Alone by D Leader is based on sourdough starters. Michael Rhulman has a bunch of bread recipes on his website, and his stuff tends to work well.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby mind404 » Tue Aug 09, 2011 3:24 pm UTC

Beer bread made with Guinness and brown sugar instead of regular sugar is awesome and simple as hell to make.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Chuff » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:43 am UTC

Just got home from a couple of weeks in the Bay Area. Already miss the sourdough. It's sooo good.

Bread tastes of life.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Ulc » Tue Aug 23, 2011 3:54 pm UTC

I just got myself to restart a new sourdough - in a couple of generations it will probably be as good as the old one. It really does take some time for one to get really good.

And today I'm trying out baking with my oven stone for the first time - if that turns out well I might start baking very often to make sandwich bread :D
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Kevin88 » Thu May 16, 2013 8:13 pm UTC

Yeah, bread, toast & honey, toasted cheese sandwiches made in the toaster oven at work out of cinnamon/raisin bread with mozzarella melted on it. Yum, yum. It smells so good, too. Must be the cinnamon. Before I started making those, I wondered why we needed a toaster oven in our staff room when we already had a microwave. Now I know!

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby EchoRomulus » Tue Sep 03, 2013 4:14 am UTC

I've discovered French Boule bread is good for more than a bread bowl.

I've turned it into garlic toast, sandwiches, and bruschetta.

Does anyone know the primary differences between French and Italian bread?
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Sep 03, 2013 9:23 am UTC

As sold in supermarkets in the US, Italian bread is softer and doesn't get steamed in the oven, giving it a softer crust.
In general there are so many varieties of bread made in both countries that there are entire shelves of books about them.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Wednesday » Sun Nov 03, 2013 4:42 pm UTC

Bread-cro!

I'm thinking about trying my hand at bread bowls tonight to match the potato and leek soup Belial is going to make. I love baking bread and haven't in a long while, and I bought a kitchenaid mixer recently that I'm dying to put through its paces.

Wheee, bread.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:50 pm UTC

Gonna do me some naan bread today. I don't think I have any fresh cilantro so maybe I need to take a short trip after throwing the dough together... Debating whether or not to garlic. Part of me says yes, the other part of me says yes, but... I don't know why I hesitate.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Wednesday » Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:45 am UTC

And then I didn't make bread after all because a fuckwit at work called out sick so I had to go in to cover. SIGH.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:50 am UTC

And then I neglected to proof the yeast and maybe my dough won't rise in time to make naan tonight.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Sun Nov 16, 2014 3:21 pm UTC

So let's talk about sourdough starter here instead of in the other thread.

Crumpets, crumpets. Some controversy on Facebook about how similar they are or aren't to muffins; not important. All the recipes I find online for sourdough crumpets are essentially starter, sugar, salt, baking soda – bam. Cook 'em and eat 'em. But I have a cookbook with a "traditional" recipe that calls for "live yeast" instead of starter and has a few more ingredients, most notably a cup or so of milk.

This brings me to my point, which is actually less about the crumpets and more about the starter: What's the difference between "wet" and "dry" starters, in specific and practical terms? My starter is drier than pancake batter but wetter than, say, a typical white bread dough. When it needs to be fed it's very sticky and starting to get a bit glossy but there's no free liquid; trying to think of an analogy but I've never really worked with a dough that's simultaneously so wet and has so much gluten development, so "slightly dry muffin batter with a bottle of Elmer's glue in it" is the best I can do.

Now, back to crumpets, here's what I'm thinking: Yesterday they seemed a tad thick, with one of the 4-ingredient recipes. Not as many holes in the top as pictures lead me to expect. So today I'm gonna use the same recipe, with the addition of... mmm... 1/4 cup milk (60 mL)? This recipe makes 8 crumpets. I have yet to buy crumpet rings so this slightly wetter batter may cause problems. I'll pay it by ear and we'll see.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Wed Nov 19, 2014 11:25 pm UTC

Bakemaster wrote:What's the difference between "wet" and "dry" starters, in specific and practical terms? My starter is drier than pancake batter but wetter than, say, a typical white bread dough. When it needs to be fed it's very sticky and starting to get a bit glossy but there's no free liquid; trying to think of an analogy but I've never really worked with a dough that's simultaneously so wet and has so much gluten development, so "slightly dry muffin batter with a bottle of Elmer's glue in it" is the best I can do.
The difference is nebulious, unless they list the exact hydration precentage (W:F by weight) there's really no way to know what they mean by "wet" or "dry." That said, there is widespread precentages that I could list off:

"wet" starters:
100% hydration: Used in many, many books. One of the reasons is due to the ease of building bread recipes (more on that if you ask) and needs less math, simple.
130% hydration: Much less common, but if you feed 1:1 by volume you are creating approximatly 130-166% hydration. Used most notibly in Daniel Leader's Local Breads, and Nancy Silverton's Breads from the La Brea Bakery

"Dry Starters":
50% hydration: Common. Used in old school french sourdough recipies. Usually fed 1:1:2 by weight (starter, water, flour)
60% hydration: Less Common. Also known as "biga natural" used in italian sourdoughs. If you feed your starter 1:2 (water:flour) by volume then you are creating close to 60% hydration.
45% hydration: Very uncommon, only used in two breads traditionally: Pannetonne, and Pan di Oro. Kept in a water bath.

I remember you saying in the "things you cooked today" forum that said you feed your starter 1:1:2 (starter:water:flour) by weight, so that would put your hydration at about 60% If you plan on doing much more baking, and want more repeatable results, I highly suggest you get a digital food scale. One cup of AP flour (any other type of flour is different as well) can weigh anything from 110g-135g depending on compaction rate, moisture content, protein content, moon cycle, tidal coefficiant, what side of the bed you woke up on, etc. I think that moving to measuring by weight will help you troubleshoot your problems more effectivly, and help you succeed more often.

This also helps me wittle down which baking books I want, if they don't list measurments by weight I pass on it. All serious baking books should list everything by weight (and hopfully bakers percentage)
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Dec 09, 2014 4:34 am UTC

I haven't had a scale in some time. I never found it to be critical to the recipes I most enjoyed making. And on the other hand, I like trial by failure - there's a lot of things that you can measure quite well by experience and touch.

Mostly though I could never afford a nice scale. Had a birthday last month and I think I'll get one now, since someone gave me a gift certificate to King Arthur's online store and I already have a lot of what else they sell. As far as bread goes, I generally have trusted my cups to get me in the ballpark and then used the feel and look of the dough to get where I want to go. It's not as consistent but I enjoy it more and that's the whole reason I cook.

I got the Bread Bible from Amazon the other day. It's way bigger than I expected. Also recently I've gotten a bench knife and various other goodies. But I went away for a weekend and put the starter in the fridge, and haven't started reviving it yet, so it'll be a bit before I can start back up again with sourdough.

Before that, I made an absolutely gorgeous loaf that had pretty good flavor and okay crumb. It was about 36 hours of rising time altogether but what really made it lovely was spraying the underside of the roaster lid with water. Hadn't tried that before. Worked so much better than a pan of water under a loaf on the stone. I was avoiding the roaster because it's aluminum and I was afraid it would conduct heat too quickly to the underside of the bread. But I finally got that golden, bubbly-crackly texture I wanted.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby PAstrychef » Wed Dec 10, 2014 2:17 am UTC

Sometimes I get frustrated by the insistence on exact precision in baking. For some things it is a good idea, but for plenty of stuff, breads especially, doing it by eye and feel is just as likely to get you a good loaf. Even if I want to get the same loaf every day for a year, making 100 at a time, the look and feel will tell me more than the scale.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Nath » Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:47 am UTC

I guess this question falls within the purview of the bread thread:

I sometimes make chapatis or tortillas or rotis or whatever you want to call them -- simple unleavened breads cooked on the stovetop. I get OK results, but I'm trying to improve the texture by reasoning about what's going on. I can't find many discussions of the chemistry of bread dough that don't heavily anthropomorphize the bread, talking about how it needs to 'relax' and get a massage and whatnot. That's kind of weird, bakers.

Here are some of the things people talk about which seem to affect texture, all of which seem to have some sort of effect on gluten formation:
  • Kneading: encourages formation of gluten network, giving you a stretchier, more elastic dough.
  • Long resting time: for wet doughs, a long (24 hour) rest has a similar effect to kneading (no-knead bread recipes).
  • Short resting time: many pizza, tortilla and chapati recipes have you rest the dough after kneading 'to let the gluten relax', making the dough easier to shape or roll out. Sources contradict each other about whether this step increases or decreases the elasticity. If resting does more or less the same thing as kneading, I don't see why this step would decrease elasticity.
  • Hydration: wet doughs are supposed to allow the gluten molecules to move into alignment faster. (McGee)
  • Water temperature: hot water inhibits formation of the gluten network, resulting in a tender dough that's easy to roll out. (For dumpling wrappers, tortillas, scallion pancakes etc.)
  • Alcohol: in pie crusts, can be used in place of some of the water to discourage gluten formation, resulting in a more tender crust.

So it seems to be all about that gluten network. I guess the confusing thing to me is, why does the same recipe often contain some steps that encourage gluten formation and some steps that inhibit it? For example, most tortilla recipes use hot water (less gluten), but also have you rest the dough for a while (more gluten). Am I trying to increase or decrease the gluten formation? If less gluten means a tender, inelastic, easy to roll out dough, should I be using the vodka trick for tortillas and scallion pancakes?

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Mon Feb 16, 2015 4:54 pm UTC

Nath wrote:[*]Long resting time: for wet doughs, a long (24 hour) rest has a similar effect to kneading (no-knead bread recipes).
[*]Short resting time: many pizza, tortilla and chapati recipes have you rest the dough after kneading 'to let the gluten relax', making the dough easier to shape or roll out. Sources contradict each other about whether this step increases or decreases the elasticity. If resting does more or less the same thing as kneading, I don't see why this step would decrease elasticity.

What you have here are different actions and effects, superimposed. Resting does not do the same thing as kneading, but given a long period of rest, the yeast in the dough will develop the gluten by some biochemical mechanism. Kneading is a mechanical way of developing the gluten. Either way, your goal is to cause various proteins in the flour to link together in the more complex structure called gluten. A short period of rest doesn't give the yeast enough time to have a significant impact on gluten formation.

The short period of rest does other things, though. The flour in the dough continues to absorb liquid for some time after you've mixed it enough for kneading. That's important so that you know what the consistency of the dough is before you let it rise; you may want to twerk slightly if it is very sticky or very dry, and you can't tell until the liquid has had time to be absorbed. This short rest after the initial knead also relaxes the gluten in the sense that kneading adds tension to the dough, like winding up a spring or a watch. Over time, if you are not kneading, some of that tension will be released. This makes the dough easier to work with, just like a towel is easier to fold when it's not twisted up like a rope.

I'm not sure about all your questions, but unless you're resting the dough for much more than a few hours, the primary purpose of that resting period is something other than gluten-related. Any effect on the gluten of a short rest would be secondary and lesser in magnitude compared to kneading, hydration, heat, salt, strength of the strain, etc.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:26 pm UTC

I'll answer what I can, some of these things are not really in relation to gluten formation, but in other factors that some might misconstrue as gluten development. I'll also point out what parts don't matter to you (flatbread creation)
Nath wrote:Kneading: encourages formation of gluten network, giving you a stretchier, more elastic dough.
Correct, this is the typical way of quickly developing gluten. Gluten is already present in the dough, it's about how you develop it.
Nath wrote:Long resting time: for wet doughs, a long (24 hour) rest has a similar effect to kneading (no-knead bread recipes). Short resting time: many pizza, tortilla and chapati recipes have you rest the dough after kneading 'to let the gluten relax', making the dough easier to shape or roll out. Sources contradict each other about whether this step increases or decreases the elasticity. If resting does more or less the same thing as kneading, I don't see why this step would decrease elasticity.
Kind of. In most cases of "no kneed breads" they relies on the carbon dioxide created by the yeast to stretch and develop the gluten strands as it moves through the dough and makes air pockets. The strands are further stretched and aligned though the "folds" that are done at different intervals though the resting process.

There are two additional actions that happen during resting times, but are obviously more pronounced in long times (especally if done at low tempature), and they are both done by enzymes: Amylase and Protease. Amylase breaks complex carbohydrates into simpler sugars. Amylase is the reason wetter doughs ferment faster, as the enzymes are able to move around faster through the water/flour matrix, and provide more simple sugars for the yeast to feed on. Protease actually works to break apart gluten strands in bread, making the dough more "workable" or "relaxed." When an autolyse is used previous to kneeding (the shorter rest time), this is the action that is occuring. Too much protease action is bad, but a controlled amount helps increase elasticity.
Nath wrote:Hydration: wet doughs are supposed to allow the gluten molecules to move into alignment faster. (McGee)
Not to put down McGee here, who is pretty awesome, but he's wrong. His theory of why the gluten should be developed faster in wet doughs is only one aspect. Stiffer doughs develop gluten much quicker, as anyone who has worked in a bakery can tell you. A stiffer dough such as baguettes (yeasted, end up at about 60-70% hydration) develop as a dough over twice as quickly as a much wetter dough such as ciabatta (usually between 80-95% hydration). I'm not sure the mechanism for this, but I figure it's because the gluten strands are much closer together, and the friction is higher in lower hydration doughs, where as wet doughs they have too much room to move around.
Nath wrote:Water temperature: hot water inhibits formation of the gluten network, resulting in a tender dough that's easy to roll out. (For dumpling wrappers, tortillas, scallion pancakes etc.)
Not so sure about this, when using a yeasted dough, the temp you keep pretty low (relitivly) in order to extend the rising time (more time = more flavor). The use of boiling water however, in such places like tortillas, is in order to gelatinaize a portion the flour, which would indeed make the dough soften, and would also probably more quickly denature the gluten, through enzymatic processes or heat damage.
Nath wrote:Alcohol: in pie crusts, can be used in place of some of the water to discourage gluten formation, resulting in a more tender crust.
This has to do with gluten, but not directly. Alcohol is used in pie crust typically because alcohol does not hydrate flour as easily as water does, which also keeps the gluten from properly developing (without water there is no gluten development. In pie crust, you are indeed trying to keep the gluten from developing fully, but this is maily by not over-working the dough. If the dough is sticky, you typically have to work it a bit more to get it to behave, which is feared might overwork or stretch the gluten too much.

Other things about gluten not metioned by you, but help in development: fats and acids. I have read in a few baking books that a small amount of fat actually helps "lubricate the gluten strands" and aid in it's elasticity and development. Acids also help in the strength and elasticity of gluten strands, but I have forgotten which of the baking books I read it in.

Here's a few notes for how I do flour tortillias:
  • Flour: I use "Strong" AP flour, finer ground the better. These are ones that are better for breads as opposed to cakes. Pilsbury/Gold Medal/Whie Lilly are a bit to weak. King Aurther or Bob's Red Mill are pretty good, or Gold Medal bread flour.
  • Fats: I keep fats between 10-25% of the total flour weight. This seems to work well for me, and is used in a few books, from Diana Kennedy, as well as Peter Reinhart.
  • Liquids: I use a mix of blood-warm water and buttermilk, about half and half, with the hydration about 60% This helps add a bit of acid, If I don't have any buttermilk around I'll use yogurt, and if I don't have that, I'll toss in a bit of spent sourdough starter (removing the correct amount of flour/water from the recipe to keep hydration the same).
  • Kneeding/Time: I mix the dough (without salt) until it is shaggy, and do an autolyse of about 30 mins. Then I mix the salt in, and kneed until the dough starts to tear, then I stop and let it rest for another 15-30 mins, and continue to kneed until the dough feels strong and can pass a windowpane test. Wrap the dough tightly in plastic wrap then put in the fridge for at least an hour, 3 hours is best.
  • Shaping: Remove dough from fridge at least 30 mins before shaping. Roll out on a lightly floured board with a rolling pin, if dough feels like it's going to rip, pause to let the gluten strands relax a bit before continuing, work on another tortilla in the meantime.

Hope this helps. I should actually get to work now, lol.
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Nath
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Nath » Tue Feb 17, 2015 6:00 am UTC

Thanks for the explanations.

freezeblade, McGee was talking about no-knead methods; was your point about dryer doughs forming gluten more quickly specific to kneaded doughs?

Also, do you use the high-gluten bread flour because you want a tougher, stretchier tortilla? I feel like that's a trait people try to minimize in chapatis, but tortillas might be different.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Tue Feb 17, 2015 4:25 pm UTC

Yes, my point about drier doughs and gluten development is about kneeding. I have tried many "no-kneed" methods, and the ones I find most successful in developing gluten are ones that are consistantly folded or stretched at many intervals, which is pretty much a slow form of kneeding. I'm not really a fan of true no-kneed, as I feel that the dough is not properly developed completely.

As for the flour, I'm not really using a high-gluten one, but rather a medium-gluten flour. I won't use bread flours (besides gold medal, which is closer to other brands 'AP'), a protein content of about 11% seems about right. If I use one around 10% (about where gold medal AP or pilsbury is), I find that the gluten content isn't quite enough to stretch/roll the tortilla thin enough without the dough breaking. I don't have much experience in chapatis, but in tortillas, stretchy-ness is certainly desired, especally when you are planning on using them to make well-stuffed burritos.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Nath » Wed Feb 18, 2015 10:06 am UTC

Makes sense. Chapatis tend not to be used for large burrito-type things.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Kristen23 » Tue Mar 31, 2015 6:11 am UTC

I like bread, in all its different forms :D There's so much you can do with bread, when it comes to cooking (read:baking). For instance, one of my favorite recipes involving bread is that of the evergreen scones. Here goes.

Ingredients:
- 2 cups/9 ounces of all-purpose flour
- 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
- 1.5 teaspoons baking powder
- 1/2 teaspoon salt
- 5 tablespoons chilled butter, cut into small pieces
- 1/2 cup fat-free milk
- 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
- 1 large egg white
- 1/3 cup dried currants (optional)
- 2 teaspoons fat-free milk (optional)
- 2 teaspoons turbinado or granulated sugar

Preparation:
- Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
- Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour, 3 tablespoons granulated sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl; stir with a whisk. Cut in butter with a pastry blender or 2 knives until mixture resembles a coarse meal.
- Combine 1/2 cup milk, vanilla and egg white in a bowl. Add milk mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until moist (dough will be soft). Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle surface of dough with dried currants. With floured hands, knead 4 times or just until the currants are incorporated.
- Pat dough into an 8-inch circle on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Cut dough into 12 wedges, cutting into, but not through, dough. Brush 2 teaspoons milk over surface of dough; sprinkle with 2 teaspoons turbinado sugar. Bake at 425 degrees for 17 minutes or until golden. Serve warm, or cool on a wire rack.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby bartp » Wed Apr 15, 2015 9:34 pm UTC

So fresh and warm bread. This is what I like and want. :) But now I prefer rather brown bread than white bread. I am on a diet... But I like it too.

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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Apr 18, 2015 6:08 pm UTC

I've been treating my starter poorly lately, lacking the time to make anything with it and missing feedings, plus I need to clean out the crock which has gotten pretty crusty. So I think I'll start on an adventure in precision with my sleek, new scale.

I'm pretty much the best human who ever lived because I reserved an amount of starter from the mess in the crock that turned out to be exactly 50 g after transferring to the mixing bowl. Pretty much awesome. Pretty much gonna make the best bread anyone has ever made. It's clear to me now, in the height of the rush of the thrill of the chase. Of the bread.

50 g dank wheaty growth, 100 g filtered room temperature water, 200 g feeding flour. I mixed the feeding flour after I got the scale, as half store-brand unbleached AP and half Bob's WW. Now we wait. By which I mean, make second breakfast and do some laundry and clean out the garage.
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Re: Who likes BREAD?

Postby freezeblade » Mon Apr 20, 2015 10:53 pm UTC

You clearly should use the first few feeds, which are genearlly low in yeast if the starter's been malnourshed for a while, and make fucking sourdough goddamn waffles.

Awesome addition on the scale, if you're like me, you'll start a purge of all of the baking books and recipies that are only by volume, so that your collection is pure.
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