The Liquor Thread

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araprado613
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby araprado613 » Tue Sep 27, 2016 5:27 am UTC

An Australian rye? Interesting. Is it in the same style as North American rye whiskey (aged in charred virgin oak), or is it a different beast?



You know, I had to research the answer to this. haha! Sorry, I forgot most of what was "shown" to us in the tour. Here's the process though.

MASHING IN

This precious combination of grains is mashed by hand into precisely heated water. Here, time-honoured techniques meet precise chemistry as exact measurements and the distiller’s intuition combine. Our local Sydney water, filtered six times, is left for hours with the grain – the once-pure water is then drawn off, leaving the distinctive flavour of the malt and the critical sugars.

FERMENTATION

To convert the sugars to alcohol, three specific strains of yeast are added in the wort. Long cool fermentations are facilitated by temperature-controlled washbacks to promote complexity and balance of flavour. After five days, we induce a wild lactic fermentation that generates mouthfeel and encourages floral and buttery notes in the final spirit.

WASH DISTILLATION

The wash leaves the fermenter at around 8% alcohol by volume. As the still heats up, the alcohol begins to form a vapour, leaving the majority of the water behind. This more concentrated vapour moves along the copper contours of the still before it is condensed in a chilled copper chamber. After ten hours, the still is turned off and any residue in the still is discarded.

SPIRIT DISTILLATION

The result of the first distillation or ‘low wines’ is around 26% alcohol by volume and requires another distillation to purify and refine the spirit. During distillation, the spirit is broken into three components: the foreshots, the heart and the feints. The distiller’s skill in deciding at what point to collect the heart is a perfect balance between experience and intuition. Our stills create a rich style of rye with a full flavour and notes of buttery baking spices.

Does that answer your question somehow? :D Crossing my finger that it does. Haha

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Nath
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby Nath » Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:18 am UTC

Thanks for doing the research! Sounds like it is an unaged whiskey, double-distilled in pot stills, made from rye and barley. All of which makes it a pretty different product from your typical bottle of American rye whiskey, though there are a few exceptions.

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freezeblade
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby freezeblade » Wed Oct 05, 2016 4:51 pm UTC

Just got the Smuggler's Cove book (Tiki bar in San Fransisco), so I've made a few rum purchases to make the highly involved recipes. The book separates rums into categories of method and age, most recipes in the book can be used using 8 categories of rum, I'm leaving out the last two, because I don't like the flavor of agricole rums.

Hamilton's Jamaican Gold: Lightly aged pot still rum. Jesus this stuff is funky, in a good way, a little bit goes a long way. So much Hogo (http://www.cocktailchronicles.com/2010/ ... funky-rum/)
Mount Gay Eclipse: Lightly aged blended rum (Barbados), used as a typical base spirit or "light rum" instead of white rum, not too expensive ($15), light bodied, a little oak, nice.
Plantation 5 year: Aged blended rum (Barbados), great rum for the price (under $16), flavor is over-ripe banana, brown sugar, a bit heavier oak.
Ron Bermudez 12 year: Aged column still rum, used when recipes call for "aged cuban rum" drier, clean, oak-y, leather and cigar smoke
Cruzan Black Strap: Blended dark/black rum. I am finding this category is awash with not very good rums (or they don't play well with others in a cocktail) here on the west coast, nearly all the ones I can find locally (and inexpensively) are all listed as "not ideal" (Whaler's, Bacardi Black, Cruzan Black Strap, Golsing's Black Seal, Myer's), and the ones that are "Ideal and cheap" are just...not here (Kohola Bay, Coruba, etc.). Expensive examples can be found (Appleton Rare Blend, Skipper's) but at over $30 a bottle, I'd prefer to find the nice cheaper blends, especially with how much it's used in the book.

The next category is "dark blended overproof" and I'm finding it nigh-on-impossible to find here. It's used in many classic tiki cocktails such as the zombie, swizzles, planter's punch, etc. And as far as I understand it, there's only 2 that are spoken of highly and imported here (Lemon Hart 151, Hamilton's 151), all others are looked down on (Cruzan's 151, Bacardi 151, golsing's overproof black seal). The hunt continues for these last two catagories.

Catagory 7&8 are both agricole rums, and I just don't like them, they have this olive/artichoke taste that I just don't like in a bright/citrus-y/juicy cocktail.
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Nath
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby Nath » Thu Oct 06, 2016 2:28 am UTC

I was actually at Smuggler's Cove last night, on a rum-sampling date.

About the dark blended overproof, I've seen Hamilton 151 on shelves here in SF, but couldn't think of a good excuse to pick up a bottle. Does using 1 oz of 151 proof really produce a very different result from 2 oz of 86 proof Hamilton's? I wonder.

Also, does Smith and Cross fit in? That stuff is all over the place, and seems like it can play a similar role. Or maybe a high proof navy rum.

I picked up a bottle of Coruba the other day because I like the Appleton 12 too much to want to mix with it much. I found them pretty non-interchangeable, both for sipping and in cocktails. They are both dark Jamaican rums, but I think the Coruba gets its color from additives rather than age (which is pretty typical for dark rum). Makes them two separate categories, in my mind, with the Appleton being closer to an aged blended rum.

I've only tried one blanc agricole (in a Ti' punch) and one aged, which wasn't so grassy. I thought the vegetal note went well with citrus, like the tequila in a Margarita. But I can see how that wouldn't be everyone's cuppa rum.

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freezeblade
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby freezeblade » Thu Oct 06, 2016 11:51 pm UTC

I'm across the bay from you! Where did you find the Coruba? I've been searching all over for it. It's usually used in conjunction in the book with another more premium rum, allowing the premium rum to shine, and the flavors not to clash. Plus, S&C is wayyyyyy more expensive. The upper tier of dark rums I can find are the Appleton 12, Hamilton 86, Skipper's, Smith & Cross, and Pusser's. These are all over $30 a bottle though, and Coruba should be less than half that for a Liter.

As for the 151 vs lower proof aspect, the 151 vs 80 in drinks is about dilution rates as far as I can tell, where in a drink that other 1oz is water when using a lower proof product is taken up with juices or other mixer. Strong tiki drinks such as the special planter's punch, zombie, 151 swizzle, black magic, count on this extra proof. I tried replacing the 151 version with double the amount of lower proof, and it just didn't seem right.
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."

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Nath
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby Nath » Fri Oct 07, 2016 6:34 am UTC

I got the Coruba at Jug Shop on Polk St. It was a bit more expensive than you're hoping, at $21 for a 750ml bottle. The website says they have a liter for a dollar more, but I didn't see any at the shop. I think I also saw a bunch of Hamilton rums that aren't listed on the website, including the 151. KL Wines has that as well. I also sometimes see Blackwell around, which is supposed to be another decent Jamaican dark rum, in the vein of Coruba (I haven't tried it).

It's surprising that 3/4 oz of dilution makes such a difference in a large ice-filled tiki drink, with all that dilution from the ice anyway. Like, a Zombie contains 6 oz of ice; would it really be so different if you used 5.25 oz of ice, and 1.75 oz of 86 proof rum instead of 1 oz of 151 proof rum? (Yes, you're sacrificing some coldness, but home freezer ice tends to be colder than bar ice anyway.) I can imagine the extra proof being important if the rum is used a float; it's just hard to see in a tall shaken or blended drink.

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freezeblade
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby freezeblade » Fri Oct 07, 2016 4:05 pm UTC

Locations noted. I can always get it shipped up for cheaper from hi times wine as well, down in socal (https://www.hitimewine.net/coruba-jamai ... -1l-106440) where it's like 1L for $17. I had heard reports that Coruba was like, $10 or something in FL. Lame, they get all the good cheap rum there :(

I have since found the Hamilton 151 (they had the 86 version too), at Broadway Liquors in Oakland, for $35 before taxes. Promptly make a Jet Pilot with it (turned out awesome), and a 151 swizzle is next on the list. I may end up switching off it and just using regular dark rum, but for now will build the recipes as they are written.
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."

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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby heuristically_alone » Mon Oct 17, 2016 2:09 am UTC

I don't drink alcohol, but I did get a bottle of Fre Wine (a brand of alcohol removed wine ) for my brother's bachelor party. We played wine pong, and I ended up vomiting multiple times. Fun times.
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby Bakemaster » Sun Jan 01, 2017 9:37 pm UTC

Cracked open my holiday gift of Bunnahabhain Toiteach last night for a taste, pretty pleased with it. Also sampled a friend's Oban and wasn't as interested.
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby ahammel » Mon Jan 02, 2017 5:36 am UTC

I got a bottle of Southern Comfort for xmas. I guess I might as well...Oh. Oh god. What is this? I thought this was supposed to be whisky.
Wikipedia wrote:Southern Comfort (often abbreviated SoCo) is an American liqueur made from neutral spirits with fruit, spice and whiskey flavoring.
Oh dear...
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Mikeski
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby Mikeski » Mon Jan 02, 2017 9:45 pm UTC

ahammel wrote:I got a bottle of Southern Comfort for xmas. I guess I might as well...Oh. Oh god. What is this? I thought this was supposed to be whisky.
Wikipedia wrote:Southern Comfort (often abbreviated SoCo) is an American liqueur made from neutral spirits with fruit, spice and whiskey flavoring.
Oh dear...

Southern Comfort is college-bar mixed-drink stuff, yup. Not for civilized consumption. :wink:

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freezeblade
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Re: The Liquor Thread

Postby freezeblade » Tue Jan 03, 2017 5:03 pm UTC

Mikeski wrote:Southern Comfort is college-bar mixed-drink stuff, yup. Not for civilized consumption. :wink:


Pretty much this. Good luck using it. Keep it around for guests that want super sweet fruity drinks (a fuzzy comfortable screw is good for this, vodka, orange juice, southern comfort, peach schnapps).

Recent rums acquired since last post:
Appleton Estate Signature Blend (red label) - Nice basic un-funky blended lightly aged rum. Might just get the Appleton Special Gold next time as my "gold jamacian" rum.
Appleton Estate Rare Blend (gold label) - Makes a great single-rum Mai Tai. A bit of oak, with a little more of that Jamaican pot still funk. Too Expensive for what it is howerever, might stick with the Plantation 5 for my "aged blended rum"
Coruba (dark Jamaican) - Finally found this one at a liquor store in Berkley for a good price on a 1L bottle. Classic dark, sweet rum flavor, with a hint of pot still goodness. Keeping this one around.
Smith & Cross (lightly aged, overproof pot still rum) - Slightly overproof at 114. Funky, smooth. I've been blending it with the Coruba in drinks that require an old school dark Jamaican rum, like the now-retired Kohola Bay or long-retired Dagger Punch Brands.
Plantation Stigg's Fancy Pineapple Rum - Dark Rum with a hint of pineapple (apparently an infusion, and an extraction from a maceration of the skins) Really tasty with a dash of raw sugar and a splash of hot water (as suggested on the label).
Belial wrote:I am not even in the same country code as "the mood for this shit."


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