The Joys of Good Cookware

Apparently, people like to eat.

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freezeblade
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby freezeblade » Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:05 pm UTC

That's awesome.
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sardia
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby sardia » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:23 pm UTC

Zohar wrote:Speaking of cast iron, it is my understanding a big difference between a lot of modern cast iron and older ones is new ones don't get polished and so seasoning a new one will never be as effective as seasoning an old one.

Is this true? And, is there a way to polish a relatively new cast iron to be smoother?

Rumor has it that the older pans are thinner, lighter. That means they are easier to toss around but also don't sear as well since thinner means less thermal capacity. That's why I like the newer thicker pans.
It's the same reason why the core of a pan is overrated. It's better to have a thick pan that holds a lot of heat instead of relying on conductivity from the stovetop. I can post articles if anyone likes. Think of the savings.

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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby freezeblade » Thu Jan 26, 2017 11:47 pm UTC

That depends on the brand, my vintage 10" cast iron pan (Wagner Ware, approx 1920's) is heavier than a current-model Lodge of the same size.

However I have a 8" cast iron skillet which is also machined flat and clearly vintage (No maker-mark on the bottom), yet is clearly lighter than a lodge of the same size.

YMMV
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby sardia » Sat Jan 28, 2017 7:05 am UTC

freezeblade wrote:That depends on the brand, my vintage 10" cast iron pan (Wagner Ware, approx 1920's) is heavier than a current-model Lodge of the same size.

However I have a 8" cast iron skillet which is also machined flat and clearly vintage (No maker-mark on the bottom), yet is clearly lighter than a lodge of the same size.

YMMV

In either case, the key factor is the thickness of the pan, not the age or brand. If you were to get a pan (or plate of metal) an inch thick, all hotspots are eliminated. *

*It will take longer to heat up, or lower back down, but it will hold a hot even sear like nothing you've ever seen before.

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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby PAstrychef » Mon May 08, 2017 8:27 pm UTC

I have allowed myself the purchase of a new kitchen toy. I own so many I don't do this very often any more, but my new spaetzle maker looks like just the ticket. I foresee schnitzel for dinner in the near future.
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby doogly » Tue May 09, 2017 3:20 pm UTC

I have one my grandfather made, which is so good. I should make it more.
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby Liri » Tue May 09, 2017 5:44 pm UTC

it's time to invest in a pasta machine

I saw a handful for $30 and a much nicer one for $72. I'm very open to suggestions.
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby sardia » Wed Jul 19, 2017 12:12 am UTC

If I wanted to be really cheap, can I just buy any o-ring to replace my failing pressure cooker? It's so old that the manufacturer went out of business, so any spare parts will have to be fabricated or substituted. In theory it works based off pressure to seal the lid to the pot, so it works regardless of what shape o-ring I buy, right? (assume I buy the right diameter)

The rest of the unit is still good, because things were made tough in the old days. mumble mumble old fogey.

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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby Bakemaster » Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:03 pm UTC

I have a Tramontina frying pan (probably this one, or equivalent from 7-8 years ago), the non-stick coating of which is pitted and peeling. It's in no shape to continue using and I've gotten newer pans to replace it but I'd like to keep it out of the landfill.

Has anyone had experience using professional re-coating services? Specifically, the quality and reliability of the result.
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby sardia » Sun Aug 06, 2017 10:00 pm UTC

Bakemaster wrote:I have a Tramontina frying pan (probably this one, or equivalent from 7-8 years ago), the non-stick coating of which is pitted and peeling. It's in no shape to continue using and I've gotten newer pans to replace it but I'd like to keep it out of the landfill.

Has anyone had experience using professional re-coating services? Specifically, the quality and reliability of the result.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2017/02/why- ... -best.html
Serious Eats recommends just tossing it, and buying cheap new ones. The key is to reserve it for rare situations that require it, like true scrambled eggs. The only other option is to stick with a cast iron or steel pan and be ok with slightly less non-stick. Supposedly aluminum pans are easy to recycle.

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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby Bakemaster » Tue Aug 08, 2017 1:53 pm UTC

I'm looking for first-hand experiences with professional re-coating services.
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby Zohar » Mon Nov 20, 2017 11:44 pm UTC

Our new house has an electric range. There's no hookup to gas and we're not going to spend the money to do that. However, we were thinking of maybe getting an induction range. I've used induction before and I've found it to be fantastic - very powerful heat, very quick and responsive, as convenient as gas but a hundred times easier to clean. Pretty much all of our pots and pans will work with induction, too.

I'm finding it incredibly challenging to understand the differences between models, and finding something we should get. We also would prefer not to pay a ridiculous amount of money for it - ideally under $1,000. And if possible, having a convection function in the oven is good too.

There's a couple of models that fit the bill (for example these two Frigidaire models), but I don't know how I'm supposed to make up my mind. Any advice?
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Re: The Joys of Good Cookware

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Nov 21, 2017 11:15 am UTC

See if Consumer Reports has done testing on any of them. They tend to be quite rigorous in their evaluations. Otherwise, I only know industrial models.
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