Hacking fast food

Apparently, people like to eat.

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BlueNight
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Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Wed Nov 18, 2009 3:55 am UTC

What's your favorite fast food hack?

Recently, I've been exploring the world of special orders at Taco Bell.

My favorite is the humble bean burrito, but grilled. Just ask for it. You may have to repeat your order, because they aren't used to this request. I like to have them add tomatoes and sour cream, and hold the red sauce. It's only 60 cents more, and it tastes amazing. It's even good refrigerated for the following day's lunch, though if you're going to stock up for the week, get them without the sour cream.

My aunt owns a health supplement store, and she once told me the only fast food she will eat is the Taco Bell bean burrito, because they don't use lard.

Another Taco Bell order hack is to order a bean burrito, a chicken burrito, and the cheesy fiesta potatoes. Total cost: approx. $3. Open the two burritoes, and mix their contents. Add the potatoes, and mix well. Spork them all back into the two tortillas, and refold. They are heftier, and the mix of ingredients is restaurant quality.

For Subway, order any flat meat sub (cold cut trio, Subway Club, though their names may have changed), and cookies. Break the cookies in half, and line the inside of the sandwich with them.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Azrael » Wed Nov 18, 2009 11:01 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:Taco Bell ... and the mix of ingredients is restaurant quality.
AH HAHAHAHAHAHAHAhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha HA

That's all I have, really.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Thu Nov 19, 2009 6:16 am UTC

Azrael wrote:
BlueNight wrote:Taco Bell ... and the mix of ingredients is restaurant quality.
AH HAHAHAHAHAHAHAhahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha HA

That's all I have, really.


I would be impressed if you could buy two burritos for $3 at a Mexican (or New Mexican, or Cali-Mex, or Tex-Mex) restaurant that match the volume and variety of ingredients listed below:

Two white flour tortillas
Seasoned grilled chicken
Lard-free refried beans
Fried cubed potatoes
Spanish Rice
Onions

Mildly spicy red sauce
Avacado Ranch sauce
Shredded cheddar cheese
Melted American cheese
Sour Cream

I've worked at a Subway sub shop, a gourmet hot dog shop, and an award-winning Air Force dining hall, and I've seen a vast variety of cooking techniques and ingredients. Taco Bell has high quality ingredients, poorly combined and well marketed to the public's lacking imagination.

Assuming the disaffected teenage workers follow basic food safety guidelines, and assuming they don't spit in the food (or worse), the food you get at Taco Bell is no worse, and in some cases safer and more nutritious, than a single-location family Mexican or New Mexican restaurant.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Axman » Thu Nov 19, 2009 7:23 am UTC

You can't refry beans without lard, that's a cost-cutting measure.

Anyhow, I thought you meant this by hacking fast food.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Thu Nov 19, 2009 8:03 am UTC

Axman wrote:You can't refry beans without lard, that's a cost-cutting measure.


In the supermarket, find the beans section. There is such a thing as vegetarian refried beans, and yes, they taste good, as long as you like the taste of beans to begin with.



Nice link; this is fancier than I anticipated.

I was thinking more of how you've "post-produced" fast food items, or how you've made your orders more special. For example, whenever I get a toasted sub at Subway, I ask the sandwich artist to place the tomatoes on the empty side of the bread. Cooked tomatoes are so delicions, especially with tuna salad.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Azrael » Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:12 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:I would be impressed if you could buy two burritos for $3 ... that match the volume and variety of ingredients listed below ... Taco Bell has high quality ingredients ...
Volume and variety to not make quality. Anyone can toss a pile of ingredients in a large, uninspired heap.

For $3 (even if you assume a low margin and absolutely no overhead) you really aren't getting high quality ingredients. Sure, they might be better than that other, non-chain place down the road that also has terrible quality, because of purchasing power (or margin and overhead advantages again). But sucking less doesn't mean you're any good.

If you like it, hey have fun. But don't delude yourself that it's high quality.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Decker » Thu Nov 19, 2009 2:22 pm UTC

I was angry with my friend. I told my wrath. My wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe. I told it not. My wrath did grow.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby blue halax » Thu Nov 19, 2009 7:24 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:I would be impressed if you could buy two burritos for $3 at a Mexican (or New Mexican, or Cali-Mex, or Tex-Mex) restaurant that match the volume and variety of ingredients listed below:


That's easy, if you live in a state that borders Mexico. Here in Austin, at an 'expensive' hole-in-the-wall place, like Taqueria Arandas #3, for $3 you can get a burrito which is four or five times as large as a Taco Bell Burrito, has better tasting ingredients (not only should refried beans use lard, so should tortillas), and comes with unlimited chips and salsa. You can get even better deals at cheap taco stands.

If you're using quality as a metric for healthiness, and it seems like you are if you think not using lard is a plus, then you're probably better off at a chain than a hole-in-the-wall joint, but personally, I don't even bother trying to get healthy food when I'm eating out.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Random832 » Thu Nov 19, 2009 7:48 pm UTC

The McSurfAndTurf - adding a beef patty (generally sourced from a mcdouble so the remains can still reasonably be eaten) to a Filet-O-Fish is surprisingly good.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Fri Nov 20, 2009 1:03 am UTC

My mom used to do this at the local Taco Bell when she worked late nights. I think she asked for the chimichanga, which used to be on their menu, but not anymore. The first couple of times they argued, saying they don't know how to make it. She told them they have the ingredients. They have the instructions still back there. Go make a chimichanga.

As for the price of food at a local Mexican restaurant vs. Taco Bell: While it may be a bit more expensive, it's way better. There's a small restaurant near work called El Taco Veloz (I think there's about 20 or 30 Mexican restaurants within the county I work in, alone. Five or six of them are all within a mile from work.) that carries a "super burrito." It basically like the burrito supreme at Taco Bell, but (1) has better ingredients, (2) you have more controls over what's in it, or rather, what's not, and (3) they don't use ground beef. No ground beef anywhere. Those super burritos come in steak or chicken. Their tacos and regular burritos come in steak, chicken, or shredded beef. A co-worker who eats there more than I do told me the shredded beef has a lot of fat in it because it's the cow's head. The place looks a little run-down, it's in the middle of a parking lot, isn't very fancy, but DAMN they're good. There's another Mexican restaurant right behind them that's gone all-buffet, with Chinese food and other food added in. Last time I ate there was the last time I'll ever eat there.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:13 am UTC

Azrael wrote:
BlueNight wrote:I would be impressed if you could buy two burritos for $3 ... that match the volume and variety of ingredients listed below ... Taco Bell has high quality ingredients ...
Volume and variety do not make quality. Anyone can toss a pile of ingredients in a large, uninspired heap.


A burrito is a heap, wrapped in a tortilla, by definition. It is a structureless mass of multiple ingredients, relying on the random combination of flavors for its effect.

However, I can suggest a twerk to improve the gestalt of my bean/chicken/potato recipe. Request the Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes without nacho cheese, and the Bean Burrito without the spicy red sauce. Ask them to put the contents of the burritos in small bowls (such as a Cheesy Fiesta Potato bowl) and to wrap the tortillas separately.

Azrael wrote:For $3 (even if you assume a low margin and absolutely no overhead) you really aren't getting high quality ingredients. Sure, they might be better than that other, non-chain place down the road that also has terrible quality, because of purchasing power (or margin and overhead advantages again). But sucking less doesn't mean you're any good.

If you like it, hey have fun. But don't delude yourself that it's high quality.


That's why this thread is "Hacking fast food," not "Awesome high-quality food." However, I still wonder what you mean by high quality. Is it the choice of which ingredient to use, such as chicken versus lamb, white rice versus brown? The choice of restaurant determines the available ingredients. Is it the quality of a particular ingredient, such as their tomatoes versus another restaurant's tomatoes? Taco Bell has a labor agreement with their Florida tomato pickers which guarantees higher wages; I'm sure that paying more means Taco Bell keeps a closer eye on their supply chain.

The disaffected teenagers and heavily accented workers of dubious nationality are the bottom end of the labor pool, but it doesn't take much skill to spatula beans into a tortilla. The management is, in this case, the major factor in food prep quality, and Taco Bell tends to hire decent people. (There is one Taco Bell that consistently gets my more basic orders wrong. However, I was pleasantly surprised the last time I ate there.)

I know that despite the jokes commonly pointed at Taco Bell, I have never gotten gas from their rehydrated refried beans, which come from a central national facility. Some Mexican / New Mexican restaurants have beans cooked on-site; I'd rather take my chances with the QC on the centralized beans.

My next foodhacking project is to study the menu at the local Taco Bell/KFC. I bet there's a gourmet meal lurking in that steam table...
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Bakemaster » Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:27 am UTC

Oh look, I finally ran out of willpower to keep from replying to your thread, here.

Ordering two items from a fast food menu and eating them simultaneously is not "hacking" and it's not particularly clever. Your $3 of ingredients are worth exactly what you paid for them. The quality of your beans has no direct correlation to whether you get gas after eating them. There is no "gourmet meal" hiding anywhere near a restaurant with a section of their menu devoted entirely to $1 items. And most importantly—take notes, because there will be a quiz—All Ingredients Are Not Created Equal.

Sure, you say this is a tomato, that's a tomato, they're the same. But your Taco Bell tomato is a varietal produced entirely with business in mind, which is to say that it is produced in such a way as to maximize volume, shelf life and appearance. Of those, only shelf life is even tangentially related to nutrition or flavor. Maximizing volume, where fruit and vegetable crops are concerned, means either more cellulose or more water. But that's just the volume per unit fruit or vegetable; maximizing volume in agriculture also means growing more of your crop per unit area. This means a much greater volume of food is produced using the same amount of soil, which contains a finite amount of nutrients and compounds required to produce nutrients. Some of can be replaced using fertilizer (which is a whole other enormous problem today, that needn't be discussed here), but many can't, and even more simply aren't—because their lack doesn't impact volume, shelf life or appearance. Ever send your Big Mac back because they forgot the Selenium? Well, neither has anybody else.

Instead of devoting time and energy to Taco Bell menu combinations, and the posting thereof, why not educate yourself a little about food science? Why not teach yourself to cook and to shop wisely, thus saving more money, creating better meals and getting better nutrition than will ever be possible at a place like Taco Bell? It doesn't sound as cool as "hacking", but at least it's an achievement with value.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:19 am UTC

Bakemaster wrote:Instead of devoting time and energy to Taco Bell menu combinations, and the posting thereof, why not educate yourself a little about food science? Why not teach yourself to cook and to shop wisely, thus saving more money, creating better meals and getting better nutrition than will ever be possible at a place like Taco Bell? It doesn't sound as cool as "hacking", but at least it's an achievement with value.


I plan on it. However, as a logically intuitive person with Asperger's syndrome, I must first lay the conceptual groundwork. In my case, that's experimentation with what already exists in the world, to grok the interfunctionality, before starting from scratch on my own project. Hence, "Hacking fast food."

So, what's the coolest thing you've ever done with fast food?
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Clumpy » Fri Nov 20, 2009 6:44 am UTC

I'm a sucker for "borrowing" fire sauce packets when I go to Taco Bell - I'll take twenty or so each time and use maybe five for the meal. Then I can use them on pizzas at home. After hanging out in the Philippines I can't really eat pizza without hot sauce. Get some crushed pineapple from the store and some fire sauce from Taco Bell (alternatively you could buy a bottle of it at the store or get some Tapatio's which is almost as good). Put it all on a $5 Little Caesar's Pizza. Then you'll have some cheap, slob-by but decent pizza.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby voidPtr » Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:55 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:I plan on it. However, as a logically intuitive person with Asperger's syndrome, I must first lay the conceptual groundwork. In my case, that's experimentation with what already exists in the world, to grok the interfunctionality, before starting from scratch on my own project. Hence, "Hacking fast food."

So, what's the coolest thing you've ever done with fast food?


If you're trying to lay the conceptual groundwork, you're skipping a few million years or so and are starting on a particularly nasty branch of the food evolution tree. I recommend making friends with a butcher, fish monger, or gardener. "Hacking" at meat cuts or a piece of land where vegetables are growing on it would be a much more productive and logically intuitive basis for where we are now as a food culture.

..But I get the spirit of the thread. No fast-food "hacking" for me though, and honestly, your subway sandwich cookie hack sounds disgusting.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Axman » Fri Nov 20, 2009 3:06 pm UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:My mom...'s a small restaurant near work called El Taco Veloz

Approaching taco velocity... NOW!

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Bakemaster » Fri Nov 20, 2009 5:09 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:as a logically intuitive person with Asperger's syndrome, I must first lay the conceptual groundwork. In my case, that's experimentation with what already exists in the world, to grok the interfunctionality, before starting from scratch on my own project.

Do grocery stores and cookbooks not exist in your world, then? It's a nice line, but if you want to study food, the last thing you want to study is fast food. Because what you're actually studying is the science of marketing and very little else. The fact that you think you're studying food means that this foundation you're building will be warped, skewed and cracked in ways you can't recognize due. You're building on a salt marsh that you think is bedrock. You're looking in a funhouse mirror and trusting the image to be true to life. You're metaphor metaphor your metaphor.

I guess as long as you're doing it cheaply, that's something, anyway.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby blue halax » Fri Nov 20, 2009 8:19 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:
Mr. Bakerstein wrote:Instead of devoting time and energy to Taco Bell menu combinations, and the posting thereof, why not educate yourself a little about food science? Why not teach yourself to cook and to shop wisely, thus saving more money, creating better meals and getting better nutrition than will ever be possible at a place like Taco Bell? It doesn't sound as cool as "hacking", but at least it's an achievement with value.


I plan on it. However, as a logically intuitive person with Asperger's syndrome, I must first lay the conceptual groundwork.


The Bible for the conceptual groundwork of food is Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking. If you want books that are less theoretical, that actually show you how to make things (but still discuss some of the chemistry of why things happen), you might want to check out Cookwise and Bakewise by Shirrley Corriher, and books by Alton Brown or America's Test Kitchen.

Clumpy wrote: Get some crushed pineapple from the store and some fire sauce from Taco Bell (alternatively you could buy a bottle of it at the store or get some Tapatio's which is almost as good). Put it all on a $5 Little Caesar's Pizza. Then you'll have some cheap, slob-by but decent pizza.


I must try this. I loved Little Caesar's when I was a kid; I don't know if it's because their recipe changed, or my tastes changed, but I'm just not a fan of their pizza now.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby BlueNight » Sat Nov 21, 2009 5:51 am UTC

Bakemaster wrote:
BlueNight wrote:as a logically intuitive person with Asperger's syndrome, I must first lay the conceptual groundwork. In my case, that's experimentation with what already exists in the world, to grok the interfunctionality, before starting from scratch on my own project.

Do grocery stores and cookbooks not exist in your world, then? It's a nice line, but if you want to study food, the last thing you want to study is fast food. Because what you're actually studying is the science of marketing and very little else. The fact that you think you're studying food means that this foundation you're building will be warped, skewed and cracked in ways you can't recognize due. You're building on a salt marsh that you think is bedrock. You're looking in a funhouse mirror and trusting the image to be true to life. You're metaphor metaphor your metaphor.

I guess as long as you're doing it cheaply, that's something, anyway.


There are those who learn to write by studying Strunk & White, by forming matrices of symbols to be utilized, elements of the Hero's Quest to check off point by point. Then there are the fanfiction writers.

There are those who learn music by studying music theory, by pondering the mathematical relationships of harmonic scales, by charting the limitations of certain instruments and assiduously avoiding them. Then there are the musicians who just jam.

Until this Taco Bell experiment, I saw recipes only as procedures to be followed, never to deviate from. It's like making the leap from writing C++ programs as if they were batch files or COBOL, to writing them with an OOP conceptual model.

Now I see each ingredient as both an individual item and as part of the whole dish. Now I see the combinatoric nature of hot recipes. Now I can stop writing Taco Bell fanfiction, and start writing my own "settings" and "characters."
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Nov 21, 2009 4:53 pm UTC

You're ignoring the huge middle ground where most people actually live; but if messing around with Taco Bell has brought you to some epiphany that lets you expand beyond fast food, then that's a good thing.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Cynical Idealist » Wed Nov 25, 2009 7:30 pm UTC

BlueNight wrote:I would be impressed if you could buy two burritos for $3 at a Mexican (or New Mexican, or Cali-Mex, or Tex-Mex) restaurant that match the volume and variety of ingredients listed below:

http://www.littleanitas.com/menu/new_menu/newmenu.html

It isn't as cheap, but their burritos are quite large and filling (unlike the burritos I've seen from taco bell), and actually delicious. You can get a breakfast burrito with chorizo added for about $4, and it'll keep you going until dinner. Or you could save half for lunch.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Jorpho » Wed Nov 25, 2009 9:04 pm UTC

Random832 wrote:The McSurfAndTurf - adding a beef patty (generally sourced from a mcdouble so the remains can still reasonably be eaten) to a Filet-O-Fish is surprisingly good.
I'd only heard of the McGangBang - a Junior McChicken stuffed between the two patties of a Double Cheeseburger. It feels more decadent somehow.

Also, http://www.thisiswhyyourefat.com .

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby hermaj » Thu Nov 26, 2009 1:25 am UTC

Jorpho wrote:I'd only heard of the McGangBang - a Junior McChicken stuffed between the two patties of a Double Cheeseburger.


I've had one of those, except kind of backwards. Cheeseburger jammed inside a Deluxe Crispy Chicken (which is my faaavourite). It was huge and not that great. Definitely less than the sum of its parts. At that same meet, we got MaJ to shove as many cheeseburgers as possible all together and eat them. That just looked scary.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Thu Nov 26, 2009 12:30 pm UTC

While not fast food, I saw someone do a food hack at a Waffle House the other day. They asked for an "old-fashioned" omelet.

If you go to Waffle House (for anyone outside the U.S., it's a short-order restaurant based in Georgia) and order an omelet, the cook will usually take the eggs, break them into a cup, and have them whirred up in a milkshake mixer mounted on the side of the cooler where some of the meats are kept. He (or she) will then pour the eggs into one of the small skillets, cooking it until it hardens. Add the cheese and other requested ingredients (after they're cooked on the grill), fold over, add to plate.

The "old-fashioned" way is to have the eggs beaten in a bowl like for scrambled eggs, then poured out on the grill. Once they've cooked, add the other ingredients (cheese, meat, veggies), fold, put on plate.

I remember when my parents and I hacked Subway. We didn't ask for subs no longer on the menu, but we have asked them to cut the bread "the old way". If the employee had been there when they used to cut them the old way, he or she knew what you're talking about. Otherwise, they'd say "wut?" and have to ask a manager. Hopefully the manager would know how to cut them "the old way".
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Jorpho » Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:10 pm UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:I remember when my parents and I hacked Subway. We didn't ask for subs no longer on the menu, but we have asked them to cut the bread "the old way". If the employee had been there when they used to cut them the old way, he or she knew what you're talking about. Otherwise, they'd say "wut?" and have to ask a manager. Hopefully the manager would know how to cut them "the old way".
That reminds me: I sometimes used to try asking for garlic spread on my bread, especially back when it was being promoted somewhat in Subway's commercials. Half the time it didn't get me anywhere, and the other half of the time it was stashed in the back somewhere, so I eventually gave up.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:19 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:I sometimes used to try asking for garlic spread on my bread, especially back when it was being promoted somewhat in Subway's commercials. Half the time it didn't get me anywhere, and the other half of the time it was stashed in the back somewhere, so I eventually gave up.


Another more recent "hack" on Subway was when they started featuring their pizzas. They had the shredded mozzarella cheese for the pizzas. I went in and ordered a meatball sub, and asked for the mozzarella.

"Sir, we only use that for the pizzas."
"I don't care, I want it on my sub."
"It'll cost extra."
"Fine."

They reluctantly pulled the bag of mozzarella out of one of the coolers from under the counter behind them, and put it on my sandwich. Only cost about what extra cheese costs. It was also about that time they featured their garlic butter. I asked for that, and had it toasted. Best meatball sandwich I'd ever had. Think I might ask for the garlic butter tomorrow. Nowadays they have the mozzarella as an option on their makeline.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby J the Ninja » Thu Nov 26, 2009 8:16 pm UTC

Most places will do any weird combo they can figure out how to ring up. That's the guiding principle behind most of these. I know that's how I go about it at my job (I work at a Baskin Robbins. PROTIP: The milkshakes there can not only be made with any flavor, they can be made with more than one flavor. Just say so.)
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby icelizarrd » Fri Nov 27, 2009 3:07 am UTC

J the Ninja wrote:(I work at a Baskin Robbins. PROTIP: The milkshakes there can not only be made with any flavor, they can be made with more than one flavor. Just say so.)
I have been meaning to try that for some time.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby PAstrychef » Fri Nov 27, 2009 4:29 pm UTC

Just remember that a wonderful milkshake from B&R will fulfill your daily caloric needs quite nicely. So skip lunch and dinner that day.
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Midnight » Sun Nov 29, 2009 3:26 am UTC

In 'n out burger, guys.

Animal style fries: fries with special spread, cheese, and grilled onions. The trick (for me, at least) is to ask for the onions to only be a little bit grilled, cause the employees will caramelize the bitches to the point of carbonization.


Also, speaking of in 'n out's special spread (which I'm sure has a ton of fat in it, cause the little amount they put on the burger itself is 70 calories... for a ketchup packet's worth) I wanted to point out that in posts above me, people have mentioned "no lard in their food" as a GOOD thing. Let me tell you, from the point of flavor, it's a terrible terrible thing indeed. Make biscuits with lard and then with crisco. make refried beans with lard and then with crisco. you'll learn. you'll all learn. yesssssss....

the lard revolution better take this goddamn planet by storm. lard and sugar beats partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and high fructose corn syrup.
uhhhh fuck.

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PatrickRsGhost
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Nov 30, 2009 10:15 pm UTC

PatrickRsGhost wrote:I remember when my parents and I hacked Subway. We didn't ask for subs no longer on the menu, but we have asked them to cut the bread "the old way". If the employee had been there when they used to cut them the old way, he or she knew what you're talking about. Otherwise, they'd say "wut?" and have to ask a manager. Hopefully the manager would know how to cut them "the old way".


I went to Subway today, was in the mood for a tuna sub. Asked them to cut it the old way. The sandwich artist said "What, the 'boat cut'?" I said "yeah" and she did it. I asked if they still taught it, and she said no, since they're not supposed to do it. I told her they should have, just in case you get the one rare customer who asks for it. The "boat cut" was a lot better, since your meat, cheeses, and fixin's stayed on the sandwich more than with the cut they use today.

Subway hack attempt 1 = successful

Next time I'm going to try to order the Pizza Sub, or else ask about the garlic butter.
PRG

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blue halax
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby blue halax » Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:54 am UTC

This post has me thinking of all sorts of silly things every time I walk into a fast food place.

At Jason's deli, in addition to my usual order, I got a salad bar to go, and filled up my entire box with hardboiled eggs. It's a lot cheaper than buying eggs at Costco, let alone a regular grocery store.

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icelizarrd
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby icelizarrd » Wed Dec 02, 2009 6:24 am UTC

Thanks to this thread, I ordered a cheesy bean and rice burrito at Taco Bell today, and asked for it grilled. The cashier was a bit confused at first, but it worked out. And it was pretty tasty too.

PAstrychef wrote:Just remember that a wonderful milkshake from B&R will fulfill your daily caloric needs quite nicely. So skip lunch and dinner that day.
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Axman
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Axman » Sat Dec 05, 2009 1:53 am UTC

blue halax wrote:At Jason's deli, in addition to my usual order, I got a salad bar to go, and filled up my entire box with hardboiled eggs. It's a lot cheaper than buying eggs at Costco, let alone a regular grocery store.

Wait, how much is a salad, and how much do eggs cost you at a store? Because I think 18 of these grade AA extra-large eggs cost me $3.29 from Safeway. And I'm not limited to hard-boiling them.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby snowolf » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:32 pm UTC

You can 'hack' freshness, most commonly at McDonald's, by asking for an ingredient to be left off, such as tomatoes or pickles on a burger. That way it must be made fresh, rather than picked up from the pre-wrapped pile.
Depending on where you live you may have to 'hack' frysauce; in it's most basic form: mayonnaise and ketchup.
You can try 'hacking' soda combinations, although employees don't often understand.
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blue halax
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby blue halax » Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:21 am UTC

Another silly hack: Whole Foods has a salad / hot foods bar with all sorts of stuff for $8/lb. Some of the spices they have at the bar cost a lot more than $8/lb if you weigh 'em out and buy them from their spice selection.

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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby sillybear25 » Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:39 pm UTC

Another McDonald's hack: Order a McDouble, and ask for Special Sauce on it. It costs a little extra, but McDoubles are part of the dollar menu, so it's still pretty cheap.
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Korbl
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Korbl » Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:19 am UTC

BlueNight wrote:
Axman wrote:You can't refry beans without lard, that's a cost-cutting measure.


In the supermarket, find the beans section. There is such a thing as vegetarian refried beans, and yes, they taste good, as long as you like the taste of beans to begin with.

They probably use shortening instead, which is essentially "plant lard" so it's probably not much healthier, unless you have some kind of aversion to animal products.
Oh, and certain food items use certain fat forms because that's what needed for it to be "right." So don't expect your vege refried beans to be perfect, just as close an approximation as possible.

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Raoul Duke
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Re: Hacking fast food

Postby Raoul Duke » Mon Mar 22, 2010 2:34 am UTC

We got our first Taco Bell up here not too long ago. Quebec has pretty high standards for the meat/dairy that can be sold in restaurants, it might be the highest in North America but I'm not sure. The downside is that there's a lot of fast food places that have locations in the rest of Canada/USA but not here. I guess Taco Bell finally caved in and decided to step up and buy the local meat, but the prices aren't as cheap as they are other places, which is the whole point of going to Taco Bell in the first place.

The only american burger joint chain I go to is Wendy's. I haven't been able to bring myself to go to Mcdonalds in a few years, I sure wish I'd cave and just go.

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Aardvarki
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Re: Hacking fast fine cuisine

Postby Aardvarki » Wed Mar 24, 2010 2:16 pm UTC

Jorpho wrote:
Random832 wrote:The McSurfAndTurf - adding a the flesh of a slain bovine patty (generally sourced from a mcdouble so the remains can still reasonably be eaten) to a Filet-O-Fish is surprisingly good.
I'd only heard of the McGangBang - a Junior McChicken stuffed bewteen the two patties of a Double cheeseburger cheeseburger. It feels more decadent somehow.

ALSO YOU GUYS:, http://www.thisiswhyyourefat.com .


My friends and I independently invented the McGangBang - we used the name "McSlam" because of the fact that you need to SLAM the whole thing into the table to get it thin enough to fit in your mouth. There does not exist a better $2.00 fast food sandwich, and I will forever call it the McSlam (plus I can call it that at work and not have my coworkers give me funny looks - well not have them give me MORE funny looks than they're already giving me for eating that monstrosity).

Unless of course In 'n Out has a sandwich for $2. *cry* why can't we have nice things like In 'n Out in Pittsburgh?
-Aa
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