So my oven asploded...

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oddy
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So my oven asploded...

Postby oddy » Fri Jun 04, 2010 8:19 am UTC

Basically, my oven exploded [no one got hurt, don't worry], and Bosch couldn't send an engineer until Thursday. The big problem is that my oven is also my grill, so it's real tricky to cook food right now. Luckily our hobs (stove tops for you Americans) are separate, so we still can cook on that.

What good meals other than stir fry, chilli and pasta can be made without an oven or grill? And I really don't want to use the microwave. :(

Thanks,
oddy.

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Amarantha
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Amarantha » Fri Jun 04, 2010 10:09 am UTC

Steak and chips, or any combination of fried/poached meats/fish and fried/steamed/boiled veg
Quesadillas
Eggs many ways
Soup (sky's the limit)
Stew (see soup)
Tuna mornay
Risotto/pilaf etc
Fricasee/Cacciatore/Scallopini/Saltimbocca etc
Schnitzel
Burgers
Hot dogs
Ratatouille
Salads, dips, sandwiches
I'm sure there's more, but it's nearly bedtime...

Good luck :)

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Pez Dispens3r
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Pez Dispens3r » Fri Jun 04, 2010 10:40 am UTC

What's surprisingly decent is micro-baked potatoes. That is, you prick potatoes and throw them in the microwave for six-to-eight minutes. Could possibly do slightly less, and fry them briefly in the pan, just to get that outer crispy-ness. Then throw whatever toppings in with it. Easily a meal.

Some tips, in case you haven't made a soup before. You want to soak something like dried peas or lentils over night. Barley is great also, and makes a very thick, hearty soup. Once it's softened, boil it up with a few cups of water, and throw in some roughly diced vegetables: celery, onion, turnip, carrot, swede, and parsnip all work well, it just depends on what flavour you're going for. Onion and carrot, for example, are about all you'd want for a green pea soup. At this stage, you could also throw in a ham hock, or a lamb bone, or some beef, and just get it all boiling. Stock is fine, too. Once it's boiled up, let it simmer for a while - the longer it simmers, the nicer consistency of the resulting soup. Take out the bone, after a while, cutting off some meat and tossing that back in. Add water where necessary to get the right thickness, and likewise reduce it on the heat if you need to. You can freeze that shit in containers and have six-to-a-dozen meals.

And, you know, for something quick a summery, you could try a salad with a tin of tuna stirred in and some dressing.
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby AntonGarou » Fri Jun 04, 2010 12:55 pm UTC

anything involving slow cooking- fry lightly your favorite meat(just until it changes color on the outside) in a heavy pot , put aside and fry some onions, then put the meat back in the pot with the onions, and add garlic, potatoes, carrots etc to taste , add liquids to 3/4 covering and close the pot's lid.Let simmer until the meat is tender.

The recommended liquids for various meats:beef will do well with dry red wine and some spices, poultry will go well with dry white wine(possibly with a bit of honey) and light spice, or soy sauce date syrup and olive oil mixture(2 tablespoons:2/3 cup:1/4 cup) or sweet red wine.
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby oddy » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:53 pm UTC

Thanks people, these all sound super yummy, but I forgot to mention I'm a veggie. *facepalm*. I could probably do most of them and just leave out the meat bits. :P

I especially liked the idea of quesadillas, I did those for luncheon today and burned my wrist. :oops: Don't worry Amarantha, I don't blame you :P
And though I'm out tonight, I'm thinking [veggie] burgers tommorow, homemade stylie.

And Pez Dispens3r, those micro-potatoes sound great in a 20-mins-to-make-and-eat-dinner situation, I'll try that at some point! :)

AntonGarou: that sounds yummy, stop trying to tempt me back onto meat! :lol:

Thanks again! :mrgreen:

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Bakemaster » Fri Jun 04, 2010 5:50 pm UTC

Most curries are strictly stove-top recipes. As is rice. Tons of vegetarian curries out there. Go wild.

Too close for curries? Switch to soups.
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Amarantha » Sat Jun 05, 2010 8:59 am UTC

Something I lived on when I was a veggie (and am in fact about to eat within the next hour or so):

Amarantha's Mountain of Nachos

for cooking:
a couple of onions
a couple of eggplants, or one really big one
a few zucchini
half a dozen large yellow chillies
as many hot chillies as you like
a large bag of mushrooms
one or two tomatoes

for layering:
corn chips
salsa
sour cream
grated cheese

Heat some oil in a large pot. Chop and add vegetable ingredients in the order listed above, stirring with each addition. The eggplant especially should be chopped fairly thinly (half a centimetre/quarter inch slices) and may need more oil added with it. Once the tomatoes have been added to the pot it's pretty much ready - a horrible-looking grey muck that smells and tastes great. Get a plate, add a layer of corn chips, a few big serving spoons of vegies, a layer of salsa, a layer of sour cream and lots of cheese. Eat with fork and fingers.

You can leave out the sour cream and cheese (or substitute non-animal versions) if you're vegan.

Warning: serving size is deceptively large. One always ends up with more on one's plate than expected.

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby oddy » Sat Jun 05, 2010 1:10 pm UTC

Bakemaster - thanks, I am not good at making curries, but I could give it a shot! I do like them though, it's probably my favourite take out. EDIT: I don't know what's going on, but if I type "B akemaster" without spaces then it says Mr. Bakerstein...

Amarantha: that sounds... delicious! Here was me thinking it was all just chillies, tortilla chips, salsa and cheese! When you say yellow chillies, do you mean like those yellow bell peppers that are not spicy at all, or just actual yellow chillies?

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Jun 05, 2010 5:33 pm UTC

Indian cooking requires a bit of a different mentality in some ways than traditional Western cooking. I found these video recipes very helpful while I was first getting my curry on, because they are thorough and visual, and also quite tasty. Provided you can get the ingredients, of course.
http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-mak ... kka-masala
http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-pilau-rice
http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-mak ... ade-cheese
Though I have to admit that the recipe in that last video is not one that I prefer for that particular dish, I know some people like their saag that way.
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Nath » Sat Jun 05, 2010 9:27 pm UTC

I liked the detail in the VideoJug videos when I was starting out, but the Vah Reh Vah recipes are better. Less British :). And the chef's enthusiasm is contagious.

Out of curiosity, how do you prefer your saag? I didn't watch that video all the way through, but the Show Me The Curry recipes look like fairly standard home cooking.

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Bakemaster » Sat Jun 05, 2010 10:15 pm UTC

There's nothing wrong with the pureed saag that you get at just about every Indian restaurant I've been to, but I prefer it a little coarser. When I make it at home I use half frozen spinach and half fresh spinach, on the recommendation of a Nepali friend whose family makes really outstanding food. His grandmother barely speaks any English but she likes to watch guests discover which stuff is spicy and laugh at them when they turn red, and that has endeared her to me. I also do the onions in a small chop rather than a fine mince, and use some diced tomato along with the sauce or puree. And finish with a small amount of yogurt. I don't really like cream-heavy curry recipes at all. When I was in England I tried some butter chicken that seemed made entirely with cream rather than butter. Too rich.

Thanks for that link, by the way, I'm definitely going to check those recipes out. I've had a craving for dal since reading Zohar's post...
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Nath » Sat Jun 05, 2010 11:14 pm UTC

Ah. Yeah, that's closer to the everyday version we have at home. Doesn't even need yogurt. The pureed, cream-based version is a restaurant Mughlai dish that people sometimes make at home on special occasions.

Oh, and here's just the dal for this thead.

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Bakemaster » Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:30 am UTC

What are the "curry leaves" he uses in his recipes? Do they have another name that's not on Wikipedia? It seems like bay leaves are an acceptable substitute. What about kaffir lime leaves?
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby cerbie » Sun Jun 06, 2010 4:20 am UTC

Bakemaster wrote:What are the "curry leaves" he uses in his recipes? Do they have another name that's not on Wikipedia? It seems like bay leaves are an acceptable substitute. What about kaffir lime leaves?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry_Tree
It has a names section...which I think I will make a list from, for the next trip I make to my local Indian/Pakistani grocers.
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Nath » Sun Jun 06, 2010 7:09 am UTC

No, they aren't really like bay or lime leaves. You can substitute them, and will probably still end up with something good, but it'll be different. Look for them in the fridge at your local South Asian grocery. (Or ask; they'll know what you mean.)

Curry leaves feature quite heavily in South Indian cuisine. They're basically in everything. Try them in uppma, a simple South Indian semolina breakfast dish that is subtle enough that you'll taste the curry leaves specifically. You can make it with couscous. May be of interest to the OP, too.

EDIT: Uppma recipe. And while you're at the Indian shop picking up curry leaves, be sure to pick up some accompanying pickles.

Man, I think I'm overdue for a trip to the local South Indian breakfast place.

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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby Amarantha » Sun Jun 06, 2010 10:51 am UTC

oddy wrote:When you say yellow chillies, do you mean like those yellow bell peppers that are not spicy at all, or just actual yellow chillies?
I think they go by different names in different places. The ones I mean are sweet like capsicums/bell peppers, but have a nicer flavour imo. They're long (about six inches) and pointy and a kind of pale green-yellow:
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Re: So my oven asploded...

Postby theGoldenCalf; » Sun Jun 06, 2010 1:41 pm UTC

For the frying pan I can suggest an easy middle-eastern recipe for "eijeh" - chop up a lot of parsley, cilantro and basil, add beaten eggs and spices (salt-pepper-curry powder should be fine, some pressed garlic can help as well), fry until golden. Goes well with tahini.

Another thing that comes to mind is spinach pasta. Cook the pasta in salt water, add spinach leaves for the last minute and turn heater off. In the mean time, fry red onion slices in a decent amount of olive oil until brownish, add sliced garlic cloves for a couple of minutes, S&P. Combine pasta and oil sauce.
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