French Sirop de l'eau?

Apparently, people like to eat.

Moderators: SecondTalon, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6194
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Jorpho » Sun Oct 07, 2012 6:02 pm UTC

Travelling in Europe recently, I came across this item on some French menus. It was translated in English as simply "water syrup". There is a distinct paucity of results on Google; the closest I've come is http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1333364 .

What is this stuff, exactly?

User avatar
Nath
Posts: 3147
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2007 8:14 pm UTC

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Nath » Sun Oct 07, 2012 11:47 pm UTC

Sounds like it's just syrup (usually fruit) diluted with water. Like squash. I haven't seen similar beverages much in the US, but they're pretty common elsewhere.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4703
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby poxic » Sun Oct 07, 2012 11:52 pm UTC

Something like Ribena?

Anecdote time: a couple of friends spent several months in London. They kept hearing about Ribena and decided to try it. It was revolting -- pretty much pure sugar with a really strong blackcurrant flavour.

They complained to their friends about it. That's when they found out that you're supposed to dilute it 1:4 with water. :oops:


Edit: looks like squash = Ribena, more or less.
All empires fall.
Don't look back.
- The Secret Knots

User avatar
Jplus
Posts: 1711
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:29 pm UTC
Location: Netherlands

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Jplus » Fri Oct 12, 2012 7:51 am UTC

Looks like Ribena is just a brand of squash. Squash is very common in the Netherlands, usually we just (somewhat incorrectly) call it lemonade. I'm a bit surprised to find out that people from the USA are so unfamiliar with it. :)
"There are only two hard problems in computer science: cache coherence, naming things, and off-by-one errors." (Phil Karlton and Leon Bambrick)

coding and xkcd combined

(Julian/Julian's)

User avatar
psykx
Posts: 408
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:24 pm UTC
Location: England
Contact:

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby psykx » Mon Oct 22, 2012 11:41 pm UTC

1:4 is still very strong for ribeana. Also lemonade is an amazing drink if it's the real thing. traditional lemonade is cloudy and I think it's essentially lemon juice, sugar and water and should definitely be served on ice
Berengal wrote:Only if they're killer robots. Legos are happy robots. Besides, even if they were killer robots it wouldn't stop me. You can't stop science and all that.

Thyme
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:16 am UTC

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Thyme » Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:51 am UTC

Oh my goodness, sirop de l'eau is awesome! I'm living in France right now and I drink it all the time. You can decide the portions depending on how strong you like it if you have a bottle at home.

User avatar
Azrael
CATS. CATS ARE NICE.
Posts: 6491
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:16 am UTC
Location: Boston

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Azrael » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:49 pm UTC

Thyme wrote:Oh my goodness, sirop de l'eau is awesome! I'm living in France right now and I drink it all the time. You can decide the portions depending on how strong you like it if you have a bottle at home.

Ok, but what is it?

You know, besides being French, awesome and capable of varying strength.

User avatar
Angua
Don't call her Delphine.
Posts: 5760
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:42 pm UTC
Location: UK/[St. Kitts and] Nevis Occasionally, I migrate to the US for a bit

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Angua » Fri Nov 09, 2012 1:52 pm UTC

If it's like ribena, it's just very concentrated fruit juice. Done so that you can sell a lot more in one bottle. I think it also stores for a lot longer.

From my experience, Americans tend to go for powerdering their cheap juices rather than concentrating them.
Crabtree's bludgeon: “no set of mutually inconsistent observations can exist for which some human intellect cannot conceive a coherent explanation, however complicated”
GNU Terry Pratchett

Thyme
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 10:16 am UTC

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Thyme » Sun Nov 11, 2012 7:10 pm UTC

Ok, I looked at the bottle and yeah, it's just fruit juice with added sugar. Also comes in neat flavors such as pineapple, passion fruit, and kiwi. Kiwi is pretty weird.

User avatar
Azrael
CATS. CATS ARE NICE.
Posts: 6491
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:16 am UTC
Location: Boston

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Azrael » Mon Nov 12, 2012 5:21 pm UTC

Oh man, this thread. I think I've filled my yearly quota for unexpected cultural mismatches in everyday cuisine.

Nath wrote:Like squash.
Angua wrote:If it's like ribena...
Jplus wrote:Looks like Ribena is just a brand of squash.

Listen, squash is not a drink. It *might* be a racket sport. But really, squash is a fruit/vegetable -- despite some of you insisting they're called marrows. Because marrow is that stuff inside bones, not edible cousins of gourds. :D

Jplus wrote:...usually we just (somewhat incorrectly) call it lemonade...
psykx wrote:Also lemonade is an amazing drink if it's the real thing. traditional lemonade is cloudy and I think it's essentially lemon juice, sugar and water and should definitely be served on ice

Wait. There's culinary confusion about what lemonade is? Squeeze lemons, add sugar and water. I guess I'm not particularly surprised that popularity of the drink is semi-regional (and the US has hell of citrus), but you guys are just as bad as our southern compatriots that call anything sweet and carbonated a "Coke".

From my experience, Americans tend to go for powerdering their cheap juices rather than concentrating them.

In the US, the vast bulk of juice is either refrigerated full-strength orange juice (consumed almost exclusively at breakfast) or non-refrigerated, filtered, homogenized and ready to pour "juice" -- with a typical juice content of (way) less than 10%. The entire aisle is filled with dozens of choices varying from deep red (cranberry) to purple (grape) colored, but not much else. The powdered stuff is super-cheap, entirely artificial and probably second in terms of volume-of-end-product consumed. Frozen concentrated juices are readily available, seem to be consumed in lower volume, and are typically lemon, lime or orange and can actually contain real juice and pulp and whatnot. Finding syrup-based concentrates is incredibly uncommon in most places. I think it's more frequent in the Midwest where Scandinavian culinary roots mean that Elderberry and Lingonberry syrups are things you can find.

On yet another semi-tangent: As the prominence of latin-american markets and grocery store sections rises, so too is availability of things like guava juice and mango flavored soda. I think this can only be a good thing.
Last edited by Azrael on Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:22 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4703
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby poxic » Tue Nov 13, 2012 3:35 am UTC

Azrael wrote:Wait. There's culinary confusion about what lemonade is?

IIRC, the linguistic analogue "limonade" is used to refer to 7-Up in some countries. Germany, for one. I recall ordering "lee-moh-nah-duh", receiving something clear and bubbly, and thinking it was the wimpiest, weakest, and carbonated-est lemonade I'd ever had.
All empires fall.
Don't look back.
- The Secret Knots

User avatar
Jplus
Posts: 1711
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:29 pm UTC
Location: Netherlands

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Jplus » Tue Nov 13, 2012 12:30 pm UTC

Thanks for that post, Azrael. It really made me laugh. :D
"There are only two hard problems in computer science: cache coherence, naming things, and off-by-one errors." (Phil Karlton and Leon Bambrick)

coding and xkcd combined

(Julian/Julian's)

User avatar
Jorpho
Posts: 6194
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:31 am UTC
Location: Canada

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Jorpho » Tue Nov 13, 2012 1:50 pm UTC

Azrael wrote:Listen, squash is not a drink. It *might* be a racket sport. But really, squash is a fruit/vegetable -- despite some of you insisting they're called marrows. Because marrow is that stuff inside bones, not edible cousins of gourds. :D
Um, you did see Mr. Nath's link, right?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_%28drink%29

User avatar
Azrael
CATS. CATS ARE NICE.
Posts: 6491
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 1:16 am UTC
Location: Boston

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Azrael » Tue Nov 13, 2012 5:19 pm UTC

poxic wrote:IIRC, the linguistic analogue "limonade" is used to refer to 7-Up in some countries. Germany, for one. I recall ordering "lee-moh-nah-duh", receiving something clear and bubbly, and thinking it was the wimpiest, weakest, and carbonated-est lemonade I'd ever had.

I guess I can sorta forgive the rest of the world for their misnomer regarding carbonated lemon soft drinks. But when you stretch it to clear lemon/lime sodas? That's too far. Too. Far. Yes, that means you France, Germany, Australia & New Zealand. You are wrong.

Jorpho wrote:
Azrael wrote:Listen, squash is not a drink. It *might* be a racket sport. But really, squash is a fruit/vegetable -- despite some of you insisting they're called marrows. Because marrow is that stuff inside bones, not edible cousins of gourds. :D
Um, you did see Mr. Nath's link, right?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_%28drink%29

What's that? You say hyperbole and humor don't always translate well across written mediums? Nonsense, I say. Nonsense.

User avatar
Carlington
Posts: 1588
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:46 am UTC
Location: Sydney, Australia.

Re: French Sirop de l'eau?

Postby Carlington » Sat Dec 15, 2012 10:24 am UTC

Jeezus. Australia seems to be the only country I've encountered that does this right. (Except the lemonade thing Azrael mentioned.)
Sirop du l'eau? It comes in a wide variety of flavours, but the French generally dilute it for too much - it tastes horrendous. I've only tried menthe (mint) while I was over there - it tasted like what you'd get if you made peppermint tea, didn't steep it for long enough, and then put it in the fridge for a while.
Down here, we call this "cordial" or "mix-up", simply because you "mix it up" with water to get something drinkable. It's essentially a flavoured syrup - like you'd use to make an icee, for example.
Lemonade, for some reason, is used to refer to 7-up/Sprite/Schweppes clear lemonade. Not even remotely lemon flavoured, tastes like shitty sugar-water.
Confusingly enough, lemonade is also used to refer to the lemony, sugary drink - as long as it's not carbonated. Once you put bubbles in there, it becomes "lemon squash" or "pub squash".
Carbonated drinks are usually either "soft drinks" or "fizzy drinks". Occasionally "bubbly drinks", but this more often refers to sparkling wine; and on one notable occasion "gassy drinks", which just sounds ridiculous, to be honest.
Soft drinks are referred to by brand name. Order a Coke? You'll get a Coca-Cola. Wanted Pepsi? Should've said Pepsi. Same applies to Lift, 7-Up, Dr. Pepper (which is disappointingly hard to find here", Solo, etc.
Kewangji: Posdy zwei tosdy osdy oady. Bork bork bork, hoppity syphilis bork.

Eebster the Great: What specifically is moving faster than light in these examples?
doogly: Hands waving furiously.

Please use he/him/his pronouns when referring to me.


Return to “Food”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests