Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

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sardia
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Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby sardia » Mon Jan 21, 2013 2:43 am UTC

What's the crispiest way to get buffalo wings? I've tried baking/broiling with naked wings, and egg + flour as I panfry, neither is as crispy as I want. In addition, should I bake low, high sear+ low to finish, or something inbetween? Should I resort to adding bread crumbs to my flour mixture? I thought I come here before going back into my cook book.

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Nath
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby Nath » Mon Jan 21, 2013 3:27 am UTC

I believe traditional buffalo wings have no eggs, flour or breadcrumbs, and get their crispiness from the deep frying. But if you are going for more of a breaded fried chicken sort of thing, read the 'Surface Issues' section of this article. I haven't tried it on wings, but it may be worth a shot.

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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby PatrickRsGhost » Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:01 pm UTC

Try double-breading. Dip the wings in buttermilk, not egg. Dip the wings in the buttermilk, then seasonings, then flour, then again in buttermilk, seasoning, and flour. Fry. Drain on wire rack sitting in a baking sheet with paper towels underneath the wire rack. Remove from rack when slightly cooled. Place in large bowl. Toss with favorite wing sauce. Enjoy.
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby cerbie » Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:43 am UTC

Just frying will get you crispy wings, but not really crunchy wings (my favorite way, so I'm good). Bake+fry works well, but the sauce absorption will soften them up some (best for sloppy tender wings, IMO).

Maybe try looking here:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/10/the- ... icken.html
The 50/50 flour/cornstarch is very close to how at least one buffet in my area, that has decent wings, makes crunchy ones.
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby mosc » Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:32 pm UTC

I don't like any breading. Just fry. Usually when wings are soggy it's half-assed breading or that they've been sitting in sauce. Sauce cools the wings down and softens them. If you really want crispy wings you can heat your sauce up a little and wait until right before serving to apply.

breaded wings are a mess to me. The skin gets somewhat insulated from the frying process and stays it's own kind of fatty, gelatinous layer. Deep frying the wing naked gets a lot of nice interaction between the oil and the skin, and in a lot of ways sears the skin to the meat. I'm not saying it's lower fat, just that the skin is less gelatinous and more a part of the meat.
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby Azrael » Wed Jan 30, 2013 5:00 pm UTC

sardia wrote:... as I panfry ...

This is your problem. Crispy wings are achieved via a simple deep frying. No breading or dual-heat methods needed.

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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby ugmhemhe » Fri Feb 01, 2013 10:46 am UTC

Hi, I would like to suggest freezing your wings after you coated them in batter and dry breading. Then, when they're rock hard, deep fry while still frozen do not thaw as it will defeat the purpose. Also make sure that by 'deep fry' i mean the meats are submerged in boiling oil. Also a great way to make a slab of crispy pork belly.
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby Azrael » Fri Feb 01, 2013 3:51 pm UTC

ugmhemhe wrote:Hi, I would like to suggest freezing your wings after you coated them in batter and dry breading.

That tip sound like an unfortunate mix of misunderstanding the twice-fry method combined with bought-in-frozen bad restaurant technique. Freezing the uncooked wings just sounds wrong.

As far as I've learned, the freeze method was initially developed as a step between two fryings: Breading (if you want) > Fry > Freeze > Fry again (no thaw) > Sauce. The freeze helped stage the prep, as a huge batch could be par-fried, bagged & tagged and frozen to be used later. It was the second frying that was the trick to crispy skin.

But, the freeze is unnecessary and can lead to drying. Just cool (room temp is sufficient) between fryings.

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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby sardia » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:20 am UTC

Oh good, some replies. After reading over, and experimenting a bit, I've settled on a solution for wings, but not for boneless wings. Oh well, I'll deal with that problem later.

For traditional wings: brine, cook sous vide until internal temp reaches 165 F(less as you cook longer and vacuum seal), and then fry at 400+ F(My thermometer fails at 400 :( ) for a crispy shell. I don't think I even bothered with flour. I did note that without flour, the oil was much cleaner and lasted longer since there wasn't as many debris to clean off. I have a feeling that I'm overcooking the wings, but the brining compensates. Has anyone tried adding a dash of baking soda to their browning? It's noticeable how much faster browning happens in all dishes. Just to make sure, collagen breakdown occurs at 160 F right? Does anyone have a timetable for how long we should let it breakdown? Would adding a light coating of flour enhance the crispiness, or just inhibit the skin crisping while letting itself brown?
One time, I was in a hurry and I defrosted, brined and parcooked all the wings in a single step before deep frying for a crispy skin. It turned out alright, but it felt really wrong to simply subsimmer wings like that.

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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby ugmhemhe » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:57 am UTC

Azrael wrote:
ugmhemhe wrote:Hi, I would like to suggest freezing your wings after you coated them in batter and dry breading.

That tip sound like an unfortunate mix of misunderstanding the twice-fry method combined with bought-in-frozen bad restaurant technique. Freezing the uncooked wings just sounds wrong.

As far as I've learned, the freeze method was initially developed as a step between two fryings: Breading (if you want) > Fry > Freeze > Fry again (no thaw) > Sauce. The freeze helped stage the prep, as a huge batch could be par-fried, bagged & tagged and frozen to be used later. It was the second frying that was the trick to crispy skin.

But, the freeze is unnecessary and can lead to drying. Just cool (room temp is sufficient) between fryings.



oh okay, i'll try your method next time :D
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Re: Trouble Getting Crunchy and Crispy

Postby Decker » Mon Feb 25, 2013 2:39 am UTC

Late to the game but...

Traditional Buffalo wings are almost never breaded, and they are almost always deep fried. I generally don't make them at home, but generally wings are deep fried at high temperatures and for a longer time than you would think. I don't think there's any trick besides that they get a bit overcooked so get the skin really crunchy. The sauce is Franks Red Hot and butter. The more butter, the less heat. That's it. No breading, no brining. Deep fry for a long time and two ingredient sauce.

Source: I live in Buffalo and I always have to be that annoying, really opinionated guy when it comes to Buffalo food.
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