Long distance Cycling

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andy33gmail
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Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:56 pm UTC

Hi Guys,

As background, at the moment, every couple of months, I like to take a whole day, walk at a comfortable pace, and just see how far I can get :-) . Most recent journey was 54 miles -which was a big improvement over the few before that, which were <=40.

The idea is to get as far as I can from home in a straight line (in a day), and then get a train home. Speed is only a consideration insofaras I limit myself to what I can cover in a day. Would much rather increase total distance than reduce the time taken.

But now, I feel it's time to up the ante. I'm considering switching from walking to cycling. I don't have a bike at the moment, but can ride one and am use to navigating (very) aggressive city traffic. However, I don't have experience on high-speed roads - and much as I'll choose quiet roads, like I do for walking - I'm still going to have the danger of non-longer facing the traffic, and not being able to get off the road as quickly if someone fails to see me.

So, really, I'm asking a few questions:
1) How do I find a reliable bike, that won't break down without warning 20 miles from the nearest train station
2) What cycling tips are there for handling busy roads
3) How should I prepare for long-distance journeys?

To make it clear - cycling won't be a part of my regular routine - I love just being able to walk everywhere, and my excercise schedule consists of swimming and the cross-trainer, and I don't want to change that at this time. This is an occasional hobby. On the other hand, I do have plenty of cardio fitness - even if it isn't specific to cycling.

Also, if questions have been covered elsewhere and I've missed them, feel free to respond with links rather than writing a response :-)

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WholeLottaSean
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby WholeLottaSean » Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:49 pm UTC

Me and my friend have recently taken to biking to London from ours then back again, a round trip of around 50 miles. Also we did the London to Cambridge bike ride (60 miles) and got the train back.

Obv. if you're going for a certain amount of time biking then you will go a lot further than we have been going. I take with me a bike pump, puncture repair kit, energy drinks and water, that usually works out ok. You may want to take some sandwiches along with you aswell.

I would also recommend getting some padded shorts. I don't have any, but if I was on a bike all day I'm sure I would need them.

andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:55 pm UTC

Yep, padded shorts are a good point - otherwise things could get rather painful!

You must have had to go on 60mph roads on the way - how do you handle the traffic safely? When walking, I'm on the right hand side, and ready to jump on the grass verge at a second's notice! Clearly, with a bike, you can't see the cars coming!

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby L337R3dN3k » Thu Aug 06, 2009 9:15 am UTC

I ride on 55mph limit highway stretches somewhat regularly. You just put your tires on the lane line and refuse to budge. Cars / trucks will zoom past, but you can hear them coming up and counter for the air pressure change to stay on the line, and they're narrow enough that I've never been hit yet. The only exception is semi trucks with wide loads, but in my experience they're always good about honking to get your attention so you'll move over.

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby u38cg » Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:06 am UTC

I cycled from John O'Groats to Land's End a few years back, and had no problems at all. High speed traffic is a lot safer than city traffic, as people are looking in front of them to where you are, you're not dodging around, and there is generally more than enough space to pass you safely. I even accidentally rode twenty odd miles on a motorway at one point with nothing worse than a couple of blaring horns and a telling off from an amused traffic cop.

As far as bike goes, I would suggest buying a second hand ex-hire bike - not too expensive but it will be a robust little baby. I personally don't think cycle helmets are that much use: either you don't hit the ground hard enough to do any damage, or you get hit so hard it goes right through your head (this is not advice, obviously). However, hi-visibility vests are a very good idea.

By the way, 54 miles in a day is a very impressive slog, even without carrying any weight. The Nijmegen marches which are held over four days are only 25 miles per day.
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andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Fri Aug 07, 2009 2:48 pm UTC

Begs the question of whether I could have walked the remaining 46 miles in 3 days!

How long did you take to do the cycle ride? How many days, and how many hours a day, how many breaks etc.

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby u38cg » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:42 pm UTC

I wasn't hitting it very hard - I took my pipes, and busked my way to pay for food and camping facilities, so I stopped every couple of days for a days busking. I think the most I did was eighty miles in one day, which is not a lot. I took a fair bit of time to meander and stop off and see sights and chat to people. Some Welsh person also stole my bicycle, which was annoying, and doesn't pre-dispose me towards them (the policewoman that came by to interview me about it, though...rawr). I was generally setting off around 10am and started eyeing out somewhere to camp around five or so.

I've just run my approximate route through google maps and it comes out as just about bang on 1 kilomile, and I covered the whole lot in roughly 30 days.
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby baultista » Fri Aug 07, 2009 4:48 pm UTC

1) If you're riding that much distance, you'll want biker shorts.
2) How is the terrain? A full blown mountain bike would be a mistake, but if you're dealing with a combo of dirty areas/grassy roads and pavement, then a hybrid might be the best option. If you're on the road all the time a lightweight road bike should do the trick
3) Get something lightweight, but sturdy. You don't want it to break going through a turn, but since you won't be doing anything too hectic with it you don't want something that needlessly requires more power to move.
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby knight427 » Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:13 pm UTC

As others have indicated, we need more info to give you useful bike buying advice. But generally speaking, you will want a helmet, mirror, spare tube, frame pump, tire lever and a multi-tool. Helmet and mirror are obvious, the rest you keep in a saddle bag in case you get a flat (you should learn to change a flat of course).

I tend to ride on less busy roads with wide shoulders when possible. But I’ve heard stories of people being hit on rural roads by oblivious drivers too, so you always have to ride defensively.
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andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Sat Aug 08, 2009 12:12 am UTC

Thanks for all your help so far. To answer the questions I've read (and inferred) and ask some of my own, in no order

-How do you know how to choose ap air of padded shorts? Is it a case of lookign for reviews of each brand and then picking the right side
-I'll be buying the bike specially, as mine broke (clean break on the back axle) a few months back, and because of its condition and the obscure parts it was fitted with, it was going to be a lot to mend. That said, I would want the bike I buy to be suitable for any general use after!
-Will be travelling on roads - otherwise the complexity of navigating will be too great and ... I'll get lost ... which isn't good, because ultimately, I risk being tired no-where near home or a station, and needing to use a taxi at huge expense
-Not that interested in making it lightweight - while I don't want to make life harder for the sake of it, I also don't see the point in making a bike lighter just to increase a few arbitrary numbers. Ultimately, the progress will be visible either way. Reliability, of course, very very important here
-W.r.t cost, I'll buy whatever is justifiably needed - won't waste money, but I don't have a fixed budget
-Lights would probably be good for safety and to extend how long I can go for. Would need to last a long time, be bright and not break easily ... none of which I've ever seen in anything I've bought previously.
-Am I better with a bike store or with the internet? Last bike I bought from the internet was build as well as ... the Tacoma bridge. But the internet is, of course, cheaper

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knight427
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby knight427 » Sat Aug 08, 2009 2:44 am UTC

You definitely want to go to your local bike shop, preferably several local bike shops. Explain to them what type of riding you intend to do and what your budget is and they will help you pick some out for test riding. You probably won't find a bike for less than $300 at a bike shop, and of course they go up to way more than you can probably afford.

I don't think those $300 bikes are going to feel good for the long distance rides you are describing, so be prepared to spend more. The low cost bikes are normally comfort bikes for casual paved trail riding. You should probably look at touring, hybrid and road bikes.

I'm a big fan of Giant brand bikes, but honestly most any brand at a real bike shop is going to pretty good quality. Also, don't be scared of small saddles (seats). If you get a good saddle with your bike, your rear won't get sore at all. But you don't need a big seat with lots of padding, in fact these get quite tiresome on your thighs after hours of pumping. The seat simply needs to support the two bones in your bum and stay out of the way of your thighs.

Do some test riding and come back with more questions if you like.

Good Luck
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby cathrl » Sat Aug 08, 2009 10:16 am UTC

As a driver and ex-cyclist, I'd say that helmets, if they do nothing else, make you a LOT more visible. It's a flash of bright colour right at driver's eye height, as opposed to some shade of dull brown which rarely stands out and, if it's at all dark, is entirely non-reflective. Unless you are a truly stunning platinum blond of course :)

LED lights are pretty good and are getting better all the time.

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:48 am UTC

I know this'll sound nasty, but frankly if you're riding and not wearing a helmet, you deserve everything you get. The American brainlessness that you don't need to wear one just baffles me (and well, anyone from the rest of the world frankly).

Anyhow, to actually be helpful with an answer:

I do endurance XC racing, so have a little experience with this kind of thing - to give you an idea, 2008 involved 9 solo 6 hour XC races; I have 6 enduros in the next 11 weeks. Training rides of a Saturday or Sunday over summer typically end up being around 8-10 hours (okay, we cheat a bit - we stop for breakfast at Mt Martha).

Firstly, the most important thing outside building a base through training is nutrition. You simply cannot replenish energy at the same rate you burn it, so eating constantly isn't optional. Essentially you want 1 gram of carbs per kilogram of body weight per hour, and 10ml of water per gram of carbs to help digest it. So for me, it's something like a gel or bar every 25 minutes (for 6 hours), starting min 45 minutes before the event starts. Obviously you're not racing, but the same applies - eventually your body will run out of energy, and you'll hunger flat if you don't keep providing carbs. And if you miss a feed, don't be surprised when your body starts complaining - no, you can't catch up once you miss it.
Hydration is equally most important. You may want to play with electrolytes as well - when you're sweating, you're excreting the salts your muscles use in contraction. This you'll have to play with yourself, but I tend to go one bottle of water, one bottle of electrolyte mix alternating.

Next most important is don't go out too hard. You need to know how to pace yourself - if you head out straight into HR Zone 5 and you're planning to do a 6 hour ride, don't expect to finish your planned effort ;) Ideally you want to keep it in or below E3, and pace yourself at E2 if it's not a race.

As far as choosing knicks with decent chamois, don't go for the cheap brands - you get what you pay for. There's a massive difference in a pair of $60 knicks and a pair of $380 knicks, though I wouldn't suggest jumping straight to the expensive end. The knicks my sponsor provides retail at around $140, so they're somewhere in the middle to low range in expense, and while I'm perfectly happy with them, they fall apart after about 12 months of wear (I do ~12 hours a week, not a huge training load).

For bikes not falling apart, that's more about you maintaining it than the build. If you keep it in good condition, you'll obviously have less problems.

If any of your travels are in the dark, make absolutely sure you have decent front and rear lights. I generally have a 5-LED light on the seatpost of each bike, and a single LED on my helmet; on a couple of the bikes I'll have a backup single-LED rear on the right chainstay (you guys drive on the wrong side of the road, so swap it to the left for over there :)

As a ballpark figure, at a reasonably easy pace on a road bike, expect to do ~30km/h solo; more if you ride in bunches.
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Hiierarch
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby Hiierarch » Wed Aug 12, 2009 7:08 am UTC

That was so extremely helpful akashra, thanks haha. I just randomly came upon this and read through it and that was a ton of amazing information. I appreciate that ;)

andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Thu Aug 13, 2009 5:31 am UTC

Sorry.

Yeah, thanks for the advice. I think I will go with the helmet - at worst, it'll make no difference!

I'll let you guys know how I get on (it'll be a few weeks before I get started on this one) or if I have any other questions

Thanks again,

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby The Cat » Tue Aug 18, 2009 2:15 am UTC

Does anyone here do any touring?

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:23 am UTC

Oh yeah, so I said I'd provide some info on how Chase The Sun went last Sunday.

Basically I pulled up fine - because it bucketed down with rain, my heart rate was really low as you were worrying more about the bike sliding around than powering out of corners, so when I finished up I felt like I could have done another 6 hours in the saddle.

Image
Image

Some stats:
Distance: 105.22km
Time: 6:27:44
Avg Speed: 16.3km/h
Fastest speed: 43.0km/h
Calorie burn: 4,163kcal
Avg HR: 156 (83%)
Total time stopped: 9:32
TRIMP score: 844.4
Weapon of choice: Custom 2008 Giant Anthem 1
Tyres: Maxxis ADvantage Kevlar
Total mud accumulated by race end: 1.2kg.

And now more non-words:
Image Image
Image Image
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andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Sun Aug 23, 2009 5:27 pm UTC

Pretty nice data :-)

What equipment did you use to record you HR, speed etc and get it onto a computer?

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Mon Aug 24, 2009 8:50 am UTC

Most data I record with a Garmin Edge 705; on the road bike it's paired with a CycleOps PowerTap PRO+.
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby joeframbach » Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:47 pm UTC

I just finished my first Century ride yesterday! PDF map attached. I used a map from a supported century that I missed, but went ahead and did it unsupported.
Previously my longest rides have been 85 miles in 2007 and a few months ago.
I feel really good after finishing it, too! It was really hilly but I'm just a little sore.
Attachments
MVCMap.pdf
(440.01 KiB) Downloaded 115 times

andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Tue Sep 01, 2009 8:58 am UTC

Hey Guys,

Right, time to get off my arse and do something; I don't like to do endurance too often - otherwise it would get boring, but I feel it's time again. Psychology's much more important than regular training :-P . (Aside, I walk about 30 miles a week getting to and from work anyway and have a regular swim/gym session, so it's not like I'm a couch potato the rest of the time). Probably Monday (first (of many) day from now with no work commitments) ... and also with good weather.

I'm tempted just to get a hire bike for a day this week. It's less money than buying a bike - and I might decide I'd rather go back to walking these distances and only use the damned thing once. Also, since it'll be taking a lot of wear and tear and I'm crap at maintaining bikes, I've just made all the hassle become someone else's fault. Their bikes may be the same as you'd get in the bottom end of an ARGOS catalogue, but at least I *know* that it'll be well maintained.

Now, my plan with walking is always to have some distance I *need* to do, after which point, I've arrived at some railway station, and then can keep walking within a few miles of the line, knowing that I can then stop and return at any station on the line; better than trying to judge what half of what I can do is. Does it seem reasonable to assume I can do 54 miles on a bike, given that I can walk 54 miles and cycling is much more efficient, or is that a dangerous game to play? I could aim at London (60 miles), making sure there are some stations as of the last 10-20 miles that I can use to cop out, and then if I'm really doing well, I can either head down to the very South of London (another 60 miles) ( :-D ) or double back (which I don't like doing psychologically).

Sorry for giving a "life story" :-P - just good to get some input, since it's been a while since I used a bike regularly (I did use a bike for a few miles recently, and didn't feel and fatigue at all from it ... because it was only a few miles ... so at least I know I can still ride it ;-) )

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby funkytwinkie » Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:32 am UTC

andy33gmail wrote:Does it seem reasonable to assume I can do 54 miles on a bike, given that I can walk 54 miles and cycling is much more efficient, or is that a dangerous game to play?


hello
i don't know much about "endurance", but i would probably advise building up from say, 10-20 miles at first (sounds like you're not an unfit person, 10-20 miles should be easy). if you really don't want to spend the money, you can maybe get on the stationary bike and just feel it out (i like those sleek spinning-lesson bikes). if you start out with a 50-some miler you'll probably injure yourself in the first ride, methinks.

afterwards you can get a bike (rent a bike, buy one, etc) and increase your distances, map different routes, etc.

good luck!

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby Paranoid__Android » Sat Sep 05, 2009 12:58 am UTC

Make sure that your bike seat is the right height, your leg should be able to extend fully when it is in the downward position, this is very important because you can damage your knees quite quickly(something about wearing down the cartilage...), it happened to my friend and almost happened to me.
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:26 am UTC

Yeah, seat should be at crotch height when standing, right?

Anyone see a problem with going arbitrarily far, but always staying some limited distance - e.g. 10 miles from a train station. Phrased differently; if I cycle at a speed which doesn't feel difficult, am I likely to end up in a position where I can neither cycle 10 miles, nor walk and push that far? Since I've never cycled to failure / near failure before, I don't really know the pattern - with walking, my comfortable speed seems to follow something like A - ke^t - I stay at my full walking speed for ages, and the dropoff is gradual by definate. Will cycling do something similar, or will it go more suddenly, like with weight training, where one set is fine, and the next set feels hopeless?

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:23 pm UTC

andy33gmail wrote:Yeah, seat should be at crotch height when standing, right?


Saddle height is set solely by achieving nearly-maximal leg extension without having your hips rock while you pedal. Using a simple rule like you describe may get you close, but you can't really effectively set the seat height without actually getting on the bike and trying it out because it doesn't account for differences between bikes like bottom bracket height and crank arm length.

Asad

andy33gmail
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:33 pm UTC

Thanks

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Sat Sep 05, 2009 1:43 pm UTC

Oh, and I just went and checked my bike. The top surface of my seat is about an inch below my belly button -- pretty far from crotch height. Remember that you don't need to be able to put your feet on the ground while you're in the seat.

Asad

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Sat Sep 05, 2009 2:02 pm UTC

ok, cool. Maybe the particular rule of thumb I found was thought up for people who couldn't ride yet and needed to touch the ground :-P . Or so people with poorly maintained brakes can still stop ;-)

Any experience on how fatigue builds up when you're doing endurance cycling? It is sudden or gradual; will I know when I have 10 miles left to ride, so I can point at the nearest train station?

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Sat Sep 05, 2009 9:05 pm UTC

andy33gmail wrote:Any experience on how fatigue builds up when you're doing endurance cycling? It is sudden or gradual; will I know when I have 10 miles left to ride, so I can point at the nearest train station?


For me, the longest I've ever ridden in one sitting is about 33 miles (yay bike computer), though the rides were decently-fast group rides (~20mph on flats, and some fairly challenging uphills) rather than more leisurely long-distance-touring type rides. When I hit the wall, it happens pretty quickly. You can take steps to minimize this, though, by making sure you have enough food energy to keep you going (which can include eating while on the ride, either stopping to eat some food or using 'energy gels' or other products designed to give you energy for athletics), and replacing the electrolytes you sweat out to prevent muscle cramping.

Asad

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Mon Sep 07, 2009 11:58 am UTC

andy33gmail wrote:Yeah, seat should be at crotch height when standing, right?


Saddle height and position is different for every rider. You want it high enough that your hips don't rock (usually due to poor core strength) and your knee can't lock out when you drop your ankle on the pedals. There should be a subtle but not significant kink in your knee at the bottom of your pedal stroke.

A starting point is 0.78x your inseam length, but that's about as accurate as using 220-age for calculating your max heartrate - ie, not accurate at all.

Of course, that's for efficiently producing power. You'll notice technical riders (eg 4X, Downhill) have their saddles set extremely low, so they can more easily get their weight behind the saddle.
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:45 pm UTC

akashra wrote:A starting point is 0.78x your inseam length...


Measured from the center of the bottom bracket, not the ground.

Asad

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Mon Sep 07, 2009 6:50 pm UTC

Done it!!!

Planned a 55 mile route, but with several options to cop out earlier if I needed to. Managed to keep going slightly lost and ended up with a 72.2 mile route ... but hey! I did it. Took 8 hrs 45. That time includes a brief lunch (sadly of junk food, was the first thing that presented itself)

http://www.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s ... 77162&z=14

Knees are so sore now, but I made it!

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Tue Sep 08, 2009 12:22 am UTC

Solid! Well done. The knee pain is most likely because you're not used to it, but be aware that seat position (not just height but also fore-aft position) can put undue stress on the knees if not set correctly. If you keep it up and you still have knee pain, you may want to invest in a bike fitting session with a local shop.

Asad

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby andy33gmail » Tue Sep 08, 2009 10:36 am UTC

To be honest, I think it's because the gears were a bit shit on the bike I hired - it was a grip-twist rather than a rapid-fire one - and because I kept forgetting to plan everything ridiculously far ahead, I always ended up stopped in too high a gear, and then having to put way too much force down to start. Particularly once I got to the city (the pain started after I'd got that far) and there was a lot of stop-start traffic, emergency stops when buses pull out when you're alongside and so on.

Still difficult to know whether to buy or hire - I won't be doing this kind of distance more than every few weeks - so the overhead of stuff rusting (needs to be kept outside because I'm at college) becomes substantial. I still want to keep walking to lectures (when they start) and to the gym and wherever else - traffic's much easier to manage as a pedestrian. That said, in term time, I could probably just borrow one.

Andy

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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Sun Sep 13, 2009 9:36 am UTC

In what was supposed to be "last-minute training" for the 2009 MTBA Australian Marathon Championships next Sunday, a goup of us went out on an absolute smashfest today, 65km but by god it was the longest and hardest 65km I've ever ridden - three A graders hammering out a route that resulted in something like a 13km/h average, 4.5hrs actual riding for a 6 hour outing.

Image

Pretty much all of the climbs were >9% - 32% of the ride was spent climbing grades of >9%. In hindsight I suspect it may have hindered more than provided training, since with a TSS of 297 yesterday and a TRIMP score of 292 today, and a race on Thursday night, I'm now worried about not recovering by Sunday :(
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Thu Oct 22, 2009 11:33 am UTC

Speaking of long-distance cycling, I have my big A-priority race on Saturday night - 6 hours at Eumeralla Scout Camp in Anglesea, 2 hours of which is under lights.

Hope the knee holds up - there's 240 solo entries this year, up from 135 last year - it's going to be massive.
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asad137
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Sun Oct 25, 2009 9:01 pm UTC

Good luck! I haven't done any sort of competitive riding, but last weekend I rode 92 miles (148km) on gently rolling terrain. It was awesome.

Asad

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spudtheimpaler
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby spudtheimpaler » Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:14 pm UTC

asad137 wrote:Good luck! I haven't done any sort of competitive riding, but last weekend I rode 92 miles (148km) on gently rolling terrain. It was awesome.

Asad


lol... I wen't on my first proper cycle trip at the weekend - 20k. Still a way to go before I reach the likes of you lot, eh? :)
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akashra
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby akashra » Fri Oct 30, 2009 11:17 am UTC

asad137 wrote:Good luck! I haven't done any sort of competitive riding, but last weekend I rode 92 miles (148km) on gently rolling terrain. It was awesome.

Asad

Sadly it really didn't work out, and I was seriously crushed by having to pull out on the third lap due to a knee injury :(

It was announced today that next year the event is going to become a 12 hour (in addition to having a 6hr and 3hr), so I'm gonna get my bike setup all sorted to stop the knee problems, and start training for that.
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asad137
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Re: Long distance Cycling

Postby asad137 » Mon Nov 02, 2009 4:14 am UTC

spudtheimpaler wrote:lol... I wen't on my first proper cycle trip at the weekend - 20k. Still a way to go before I reach the likes of you lot, eh? :)


Surprisingly...no. If someone had told me 3 months ago that I'd be able to ride ~150km, I would have laughed in their face. But...here I am, having done it. Before I got my new road bike in mid-august, the longest I had ever biked was about 30km. So it may not take as much time as you think!

akashra wrote:Sadly it really didn't work out, and I was seriously crushed by having to pull out on the third lap due to a knee injury :(

It was announced today that next year the event is going to become a 12 hour (in addition to having a 6hr and 3hr), so I'm gonna get my bike setup all sorted to stop the knee problems.


Ah, sucks to hear that. A good fitting with probably help, but let me tell you, with the help of t3h int4rw3bs, I was able to get my own fit on my bike dialed in pretty well. Where are you having knee pain (front, back, inside, outside)? Have you tried the so-called "KOPS" position (knee over pedal spindle)? It's a good starting point for any adjustments that need to be made. I know I was having some back-of-knee pain after I swapped seatposts, and moving the saddle 1/4" forward and 1/4" down got rid of it all.

Asad


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