Gym use advice

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Adacore
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Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue May 24, 2011 9:39 am UTC

So, first off, intro stuff: I'm 26, 60kg (132lb), 5'11". I'm your typical skinny geek, my fitness is middling (certainly not great, but not terrible either), and my strength is terrible. So the goal is fairly simple - I want to be fitter and stronger. I guess maybe get up to something more like 150lb, and put on some muscle.

Until a couple of months ago, I used to exercise once a week, playing squash for an hour or two with colleagues, but I've just relocated to South Korea, and I don't have anyone to play with or anywhere to play here. And I should probably be exercising more than that, in a more focussed way, anyway.

What I do have, in the building I'm now living in, is a fairly well equipped gym, with free entry. The problem is I've never used a gym before, at all; there are lots of pretty black and silver machines, but I don't have a clue how to use them (upside - at least the treadmill controls are in English). I think there are trainers, but they're Korean with little to no English (and I only know about ten words of Korean). So - I'm quite happy to spend an hour or so every day working out, but I could really use some advice on what I should be doing, how to use the machines, what sort of balance I should strike between strength and cardio training, whether I should do both in the same workout, etc. I've started researching stuff using google, but if anyone has any helpful advice or tips, that'd be grand too! :mrgreen:

EDIT: I think I'll go down to the gym and take some photos of the machines either tonight or tomorrow so I can work out what's there. Then I can look up how to use them. A plan!

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Nath
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Tue May 24, 2011 10:46 am UTC

Are there any free weights? They work a lot better than machines, for several reasons that I can bore you with if you're curious.

But without getting into that whole issue, some things to keep in mind when programming your strength training:
  • Compound movements. You want each movement to span multiple joints and use as much muscle mass as possible.
  • Constant progression. Lifting the same weight for the same number of reps workout after workout doesn't buy you much. You need to keep scaling up for continued progress.
  • However much you're lifting, you'll need to eat more to gain weight. Aim for about 1g of protein per lb of body mass, and a few hundred more calories overall than you currently eat.
  • 3 sets of 5 three times a week is a good rep scheme for heavy compound movements for beginners.
  • Strength training and endurance training interfere with each other. Plan your 'cardio' workouts on separate days from strength workouts if possible. High intensity interval training will probably interfere less than extended treadmill-type stuff.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue May 24, 2011 12:05 pm UTC

There are free weights - I'll check them out next time I'm there. Thanks for the help!

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby nightbird » Tue May 24, 2011 3:06 pm UTC

Google Stronglift 5x5 and don't do 5x5, but 4x10 (this will become clearer when you read the full description). Start with low weights and perfect your exercise technique (watch youtube tutorials) before you slowly ramp up the weights. If you feel the need to do something for endurance, add tabata sprints once or twice a week - if you really want to add size though, leave it for the future; you're genetically an ectomorph and will need every single calory you can get to get heavier. Eat three big (MASSIVE meals a day (including breakfast, I recommend 3 scrambled eggs, 1 bowl of porridge and and apple) and add snacks in between, healthy food if you can. Oatmeal, cereal bars and protein powder are your friends; aim for 120-150g of protein and 300g of carbs each day, maybe even more carbs. You'll also gain some fat, but it'll be easy for you to lose it later.

I'm 5'11" and used to weigh 138lbs, currently 149 and counting - I know what it's like ^^
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue May 24, 2011 3:12 pm UTC

Also, don't hesitate to ask someone for advice. Gym rats are a surprisingly helpful group of people, typically speaking. At the very least, you can observe someone using a machine and monkey see monkey do.

I think the best way to get started though is to get a goal. 'Getting fit' is a bit general, maybe you want to improve your mile time to sub 6, or max out on the benchpress at 200 lbs. Whatever your goal, you can build a workout around that.

Of course, if you just want to get fit, I'd suggest starting with light cardio, and targeting specific muscle groups. My typical workout is pretty short; 20 minute run, biceps, triceps, shoulders, pecs, abs, quads, maybe something odd on a cable machine, at least half an hour of shmoozing, at least 5 minutes of staring at cute girls (spread over the whole thing, of course), and at least ten trips to the water fountain.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue May 24, 2011 3:32 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:I think the best way to get started though is to get a goal. 'Getting fit' is a bit general, maybe you want to improve your mile time to sub 6, or max out on the benchpress at 200 lbs. Whatever your goal, you can build a workout around that.

Yeah - I should probably have a specific goal (or goals), but I can't easily set one until I know what my current level is. I'll do some exploratory stuff for a week or so and then try and come up with some suitable targets :D

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue May 24, 2011 3:37 pm UTC

I'm not suggesting that you NEED a goal, just that it'll help keep you motivated and focused. I think it's important to remember to have fun; gyms can get a bad rep for being super serious or treated as a task, or work. Just because something is hard doesn't mean it has to be unpleasant or not enjoyable.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby caje » Wed May 25, 2011 2:25 am UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:targeting specific muscle groups.


I would not do that as a beginner. It will be a waste of time compared to doing squats/dead-lifts/press/bench press/chin-ups/pull-ups which will add large amounts of muscle all over the body faster then doing isometric work.

Does your gym have a barbell and a squat/power rack? If it does I suggest you pick up a copy of starting strength. (it goes into exhaustive detail on form)

Also go with Nath's eating advice.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed May 25, 2011 3:16 am UTC

I mean, you just listed a couple workouts that target specific muscle groups. So... Right.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Wed May 25, 2011 3:36 am UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:I mean, you just listed a couple workouts that target specific muscle groups. So... Right.

The exercises caje listed are compound movements that involve several muscle groups working as a unit over the full range of motion. For instance, squats are not a quad exercise; the quads are involved, yes, but so are the muscles of the posterior chain (hamstrings, glutes etc.) and spinal stabilizers (abs, erector spinae). Compare this to the workout you described (isolation exercises for the beach muscles). Very different approaches to exercise. Compound exercises use specific muscles, yes, but they don't isolate those muscles. They use them as part of a larger unit. This is better for most purposes.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Izawwlgood » Wed May 25, 2011 1:02 pm UTC

I didn't list specific workouts, just muscles I target. I tend to work them by
caje wrote:doing squats/dead-lifts/press/bench press/chin-ups/pull-ups

I also never used the word 'isolate'.

This is wrong mentality to have if you want to encourage someone to use the gym; arguing over specific nuances or proper techniques to getting fit is a surefire way to convince someone it's not worth their time.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Wed May 25, 2011 7:09 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:This is wrong mentality to have if you want to encourage someone to use the gym; arguing over specific nuances or proper techniques to getting fit is a surefire way to convince someone it's not worth their time.

Fair point. Taken to PMs.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby caje » Wed May 25, 2011 7:36 pm UTC

Izawwlgood wrote:I mean, you just listed a couple workouts that target specific muscle groups. So... Right.


No I didn't. I listed the 4 main exercises that will hit almost every part of your body. And if the OP uses the rep/set range Nath laid out and increases the weight every time he is not targeting specific muscle groups he will be getting strong fast and most all of his body will be getting larger.

Really it is advice to not go to the gym and do a thousand different exercises that will only hit very few muscles groups each.

I maybe needed to clarify more for the OP. I would suggest you split your workout in either a day where you do squats and press, (A day) or Dead-lift and Bench-press(B day). So your training looks like A day, rest day, B day, Rest day, A day, Rest day, etc.

Or Work out Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Squat all three days, alternate bench press and press and dead-lift either Wednesday or Monday and Friday basically alternating it with nothing.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Mon Jul 02, 2012 12:10 am UTC

Update time! I never did use anything other than the treadmill at the gym last year, I was still too intimidated by the machines. I tried to do a bodyweight-only strength routine for a bit, but that only lasted a couple of weeks.

Then, about 6 weeks ago, one of my friends here asked if I wanted to go to the gym with her. She knows her stuff, at least at the basic level, so now I'm going three times a week, a 1-2 times with her at a public gym and the rest at my dormitory gym. We're doing the same stuff in every gym session, for the most part; we don't have a 'focus on one area one day, then another area the next' thing, which I've heard is pretty common.

The workout I'm doing at the moment looks roughly like this. I'll include the weights I'm using so you can laugh at how hilariously weak I am:

Spoiler:
Upper body - 3x10 of:
Hammer curls (7kg, probably up to 8 this/next week)
Dumbbell shoulder press (5kg, should maybe be 6 but there are only 5s or 7s at the public gym we go to and I can't do 7kg)
Tricep extensions (5kg, I really hate this exercise and will probably switch to something different for triceps this week)
Dumbbell bent over rows (10kg, might bump this to 11 or 12)
Bench press (20kg [i.e. just the bar], maybe 25 soon; I only do bench press at the public gym, so only once or twice a week)

Lower body - 3x10 of:
Leg extensions (40kg)
Leg curl (35kg)
Leg press (85kg, not every workout. We've been talking about switching to squats instead, but the bar hurts my shoulders/back where it presses against the bones. I'm gonna give it another try though.)

We also do a whole plethora of floor stuff for the core, but I don't think it's really worth describing at length.

The whole lot takes about 40 minutes in my gym (where there's never any competition for weights/machines, and I don't stop to chat) and about an hour in the public gym (where there is, and I do).

I'm wondering how I should go about tracking progress. At the moment I'm only weighing myself (currently 58kg, up from 56kg six weeks ago), but I should probably keep a record of what weights I'm using for the exercises and when I'm moving up. Also, if anyone has suggestions of fun exercises to do for triceps, that'd be cool. I think we're looking at some kind of pulldowns at the moment. Any other suggestions would also be welcome.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby philsov » Mon Jul 02, 2012 5:41 pm UTC

we don't have a 'focus on one area one day, then another area the next' thing, which I've heard is pretty common.


Just because its common doesn't mean its most beneficial :). It's great for lifting experts who need that sort of volume and rest in order to stimulate muscle growth, but for beginners and intermediates they get a lot more benefit with reduced volume and increased frequency -- that is, instead of doing 3 different shoulder exercises in a cluster once a week (ie, shoulder day), do one exercise three times a week. Beginners and Intermediates recover a lot quicker so those sort of body part splits will still see some results, just not optimal results.

Given that you're doing.... 8 different exercises, each at 3x10... how in the world are you able to do all that in 40 minutes to an hour? You want to rest inbetween sets for at least a minute, if not 2. Also, doing a warmup set or two at less-than-working resistance is beneficial. Given my rest and warmup sets it takes me 40 minutes to do about 4 different exercises. Just by doing this you'll see an increase in lifts, because I garner right now you're able to breeze through the first set and struggle to complete (if not fail to complete) the last set. At proper resistance you should be struggling a little to complete the first set.

While 3 sets is pretty much standard, the 10 rep scheme is okay, pending your goals. About 5 reps a set will get you good strength gains, and 12 will get you good endurance gains. 8 is a good halfway point. Any of these rep schemes will give muscle growth assuming they're being properly fatigued, you're eating, and you're getting good rest at night. Either way, you're best off just sticking to a scheme and holding to it.

With this whole "get more rest" thing in mind, your program could use some major improvement. Workout order can make a big difference, and I'm going to assume you listed them in the order preformed.

1) Compounds before isolations - curl at the end, never the beginning.
2) You want to separate like-muscled exercises -- doing shoulder press, tricep isolation, and bench press all back to back will shred the crap out of your triceps, and your bench will suffer because of this.

So I suggest halving the current routine and giving yourself more rest time -- you'll have your A days and your B days -- and separating out the exercises accordingly. There's two main schemes to do this; ABx and AxBx. If you go ABx concentrate similar muscles onto your A days (say, lower + core) and B will be upper body. If you go AxBx, A and B both take in about half of the upper/lower/core exercises each.

For triceps, I loves me some dips.

For squats, squeeze your shoulderblades together and then take on the weight of the bar. That muscle will provide some extra paddage for you. Sometimes a foam cushion is available as well.

For tracking progress, I use a google docs spreadsheet. I can access them from any computer or my phone. A 26-column wide sheet will last me for 2 to 3 months, at which point I insert a lot of rows at the top. This way the pertinent stuff is always available with minimal scrolling, but record are available by simply scrolling down.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:05 pm UTC

First of all, congratulations on getting the habit started! That's the difficult part.

I agree with a lot of what philsov just said, but the foam cushion for squats is a bad idea. You want as little squishy stuff as possible between your feet and the bar -- rigid objects transmit the force more efficiently. The thickness and wobbliness will also make it harder for you to hold the bar securely. Squatting will stop hurting your shoulders once you find the right position for the bar. The best way is to find someone to show you, but failing that, you could do some research online or buy a book (Starting Strength is the most detailed I've found for this stuff, and the electronic version costs $10). The other option is to do front squats instead. They will not hit the posterior chain as much, but they are still better than leg presses and knee extensions. You probably want to stop doing the leg machine stuff anyway; leg curls and extensions are generally misused and potentially harmful. Squats hit all these muscles, as well as glutes, making them work together as they are designed to.

Overheaded presses and benching will provide adequate tricep work, but you'll need to be more aggressive about increasing the weight. If you successfully complete your prescribed reps, increase the weight next time. You may not get all the reps the following workout, but that's OK; keep repeating the weight until you do.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue Jul 03, 2012 7:38 am UTC

On the timing/sequence stuff - at the public gym we go to regularly it's always busy and there are normally people waiting for machines/weights/benches. That means we've generally been doing things in whatever order they happen to be available, and trying to be relatively fast about things when we get them. At my gym it's not a problem (I normally only go there when I have a fair bit of time, and it's never crowded), but I guess I've learnt to do things from the public gym. I'll try slowing it down some and re-ordering stuff when I'm at my gym.

The time was probably an underestimate, too, I think if I do everything on that list it's probably closer to an hour at my gym and nearer 90 minutes at the public gym.

We've been mostly alternating exercises as a way to rest. So, for example, I'll do one set of ten for each of hammer curls, dumbbell shoulder press, and dumbbell bent over rows before looping back to do my second set of ten, starting with the curls again. Similarly with the leg machines, I'll alternate between them. I'm not sure if that's ok or not, it's certainly not separation of exercises. With the bench press, we just alternate which of us does it while the other one waits. This probably results in less than a minute rest though.

I've encountered another problem with squat, which is kinda odd. When I put my arms back to hold the bar at my shoulders, it seems to cause some circulation problems. My hands get really pins-and-needles-ish by the end of a set of ten.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Tue Jul 03, 2012 7:51 am UTC

Adacore wrote:I've encountered another problem with squat, which is kinda odd. When I put my arms back to hold the bar at my shoulders, it seems to cause some circulation problems. My hands get really pins-and-needles-ish by the end of a set of ten.

You almost certainly have the bar in the wrong spot, and may be using too narrow or too wide a grip. The correct position for a bar is not something you necessarily know by instinct; you need to look up how to do it correctly or have someone competent show you. Someone competent would probably be a powerlifter or Olympic lifter, and not a trainer or standard issue gym rat.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:52 am UTC

So, update. My weight has been irritatingly steady at 58-59 kg for the last couple of months. I thought I was making some gradual progress there, but the last measurement I took was 58.1 kg, which is the lowest it's been for 6 weeks. I'm not sure I really mind this too much, though, because I'm definitely getting more muscular - my arms, chest and abs have (or at least appear to have) considerably more muscle than they did a couple of months ago. It does raise the question as to where I'm losing weight from, given I'm definitely gaining volume in my arms/chest.

I've changed up a few of the exercises as well, and bumped up the weights on a lot of them. I've also increased the reps on all the floor stuff from 10 to 20. Currently doing, normally in this order:
Spoiler:
3x10 Bench press (35kg, doing it every session now; only just went up to 35kg, so I can't do the full 30 reps yet)
Floor stuff for abs (~12 different exercises, totalling about 440 crunches or similar overall)
Dumbbell shoulder press (7kg, switched from doing this seated to doing it standing)
Dumbbell bent over rows (13kg, my form got wildly sloppy here, but I think is ok again now; I'll go up to 15kg soon I think)
Rope pulldowns (30kg; this is over half my body weight, with much more weight it might be hard to isolate the triceps and not just lift myself off the ground)
Bicep curls (10kg, switched from hammer to regular curls, because grip was becoming a problem with hammer curls, especially when my hands were sweaty)
Squat (60kg, I think I'm sorted on the position of the bar now, but my gym only has a restrained bar on those rail things, so getting myself centred properly can be tricky, and it doesn't involve as many muscles as I'd like)

That takes me a little under an hour, with appropriate rest times, assuming there's not much competition for weights/machines. If the gym's pretty empty I tend to save time by alternating pulldowns with curls and squats with rows, doing that brings it down to around 45 minutes.

Any ideas what I should do for core/abs stuff? I'm getting to the point where 20 reps on each isn't too hard there. I could push it up to 25 or 30 reps, but it'll start getting to the point where it's taking longer than I'd like if I do too much more. I guess I should look into weight-stuff you can do to work out abs.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby nightbird » Wed Sep 12, 2012 11:49 am UTC

For abs: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI1xHnMVcfk These are HARD. You can do them on a smith machine set to the highest point.

But if I were you, I'd just take a bar off the bench, a few plates with it and go with option 1 from this article for 3-4 months: http://chadwaterbury.com/3-simple-ways- ... le-growth/

Gaining or losing weight is a matter of diet. Eat more, gain, eat less, lose. Yes, activity level and protein intake etc also play a role but it still boils down to calories at the end of the day. at your weight, you can stuff yourself. 58kg is seriously underweight for your height (although it's pretty much what I looked like when I was 23 years old)...
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby mieu » Thu Sep 13, 2012 2:07 pm UTC

In addition to what nightbird said about mass gain being dependent upon caloric excess (you can't gain on a deficit) close attention to macronutrient intake is also key. Remember that just because the scale hasn't moved doesn't mean you're not gaining muscle. You may be gaining very slowly--more lean muscle mass means higher basal metabolic rate. You're burning off more calories just by existing because you have more lean muscle mass. Whether or not those calories burnt are from fat or muscle depends on what you eat, how much you eat and when you eat it. I'm not sure that this is the case since you're at such a low weight, but it may become the case if you plateau once you start making measurable gains (as you gain, you'll need to increase how much you eat), so you should probably start just by eating more and keeping up your regimen.

20 reps per set seems like a bit high, but I've only ever worked with free weights (dumbbell, barbell, kettlebell). The rule of thumb that I was taught by my trainer was (depending on the exercise) to keep the reps between 5 and 10 per set, and increase the weight so that it's tough to finish each set. Breaks between sets between 2 and 5 minutes (depending on how many muscles are recruited) and 4-5 sets total.

Google "EXRX" and check out their muscle/exercise directory. For your abs, try gripping a plate to your chest during your crunches, different levels of incline, or something like the 'Roman chair.' I'm female so we are generally told that it's not really worth it to exercise the RA muscles to a great extent (though one should not completely neglect such a large muscle group). Listening to my male friends--you won't get a six pack from strength training alone, it requires a lot of diet discipline to reduce your body fat so that your abdominal muscles are visible.

Use a tape measure to help measure your gains!

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue Mar 12, 2013 1:12 am UTC

So I went pretty regularly until Christmas, then only a few times in January/February (which I guess at least means I missed the temporary influx of new-years-resolution gym attendees). But I'm going 3 times a week again now.

I've changed up my workout a little to be closer to the Starting Strength basic stuff, so now I'm doing:

3x8 Bench press (35kg, should go up to 40kg soon)
3x8 Squat (60kg, I slacked on squat a lot in the autumn, but should start progressing again now)
3 or 4 sets of as many pull-ups (chin-ups) as I can do. At the moment this is normally something like 5, 4, 4, (3).
3x8 Dumbbell shoulder press (still 7kg, but should go up here soon too, I'm back to doing this seated again because I think it gives me better form)

I'm debating whether or not to keep the bent over dumbbell rows and rope pulldowns. I'm doing them about half the time at the moment, but I think the other stuff I'm doing works similar muscles, right? I've also cut back a lot on the 'abs' work, I'll still do some, but not as much as I was doing (mostly just as a longer rest break for my arms between the bench press and the other arm exercises).

I kind of want to start doing deadlift too, but (a) I don't have any long trousers/socks and I'm worried I'd shred my shins and (b) I don't have anyone to show me how to do it and I'm worried without some instruction I'd not have good form. I'm moving apartments next month, though, and I'll probably be attending a different gym some of my friends go to once I've moved, so I'm hopeful that one of them can help me with starting deadlifts, and also give me a spot for bench press when I need it.

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Re: Gym use advice

Postby nightbird » Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:03 am UTC

To be honest, you've spent the past two years going nowhere - mainly by not eating enough and being inconsistent. Right now, I'll just tell you this: STICK TO SOMETHING. Get stronger. Eat more. Don't quit, don't get hurt. If you don't get fitter in the gym, what's the point? It's wasted time, time you will never get back.

for now, focus on these goals (which you should be able to reach before the year is over):

10 pull ups
Bench press 135
Squat 175

Also do deadlifts and shoulder presses, but I decided to give you three (very basic) numbers. They are still very, very low in terms of strength but they will be better than nothing.
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:05 pm UTC

I don't think I've been that inconsistent, although I can see how you might get that from this thread. I've been doing squats + bench press + pull ups consistently for about 6 months now, and I only started going to the gym 9 months ago (yes, I made this thread before then, but I didn't actually do anything for over a year after that). I agree I've not been going to the gym as consistently as I should've at times - there was a two month period at the start of the year where I didn't do much - but I've mostly settled into a regular routine now.

In terms of metrics, I'm up from 25kg bench press when I started to 40kg now - yeah, I realise that's still weak as hell, but it's a big improvement for me. I'm now squatting 75kg, too (I wasn't really pushing myself enough on that before, so I stepped it up a bit until I found my limit). I'm also just starting with 9kg dumbbell shoulder press. 3x8 sets, for all of those. I've also gone from not being able to do any pull-ups to being able to reliably do 5. Maybe those are pathetic gains, but it doesn't feel like going nowhere, and my physique certainly looks somewhat more muscular than it did this time last year.

I know I should do deadlift, but it's intimidating - I'm not confident I can get good form on my own without someone to help. I thought I'd be in a position to get that next month, so I was holding off on starting until then, but it turns out my plans there fell through, so I should probably just take the plunge and do it on my own.

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Nath
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Mon Apr 15, 2013 3:22 pm UTC

Nothing pathetic about those gains. Those numbers may not be unusually high yet, but going from weak to average will make a bigger difference to your long-term health and quality of life than going from strong to stronger. So there's lots more to do, but you've already achieved something quite valuable.

It's quite possible to learn the deadlift on your own without getting injured. I did. You'll need:
  • A detailed written description of how to do the lift. There are many online, and in books. Again, I recommend Starting Strength (e-book or dead-tree). In any case, pick one and stick with it for now, because slight differences in cuing and terminology will confuse you if you look at too many sources this early.
  • Some time on YouTube or strength forums, viewing deadlift demos and form checks, trying to tell the good ones from the bad.
  • Some sort of video camera, so you can review your form. No, a mirror won't work.
  • Optional: a strength forum where you can post form checks. The author of the book I recommended runs a forum where he and others do free form checks. I'd be glad to take a look myself, if you'd rather post them here or by PM.

And remember, you don't need to start super heavy. A healthy young adult is quite unlikely to get injured deadlifting 60kg, even with bad form. But you can start even lower, as long as you somehow raise the bar to standard height.

How's your bodyweight now?

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Adacore
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Adacore » Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:06 am UTC

Weight is the main area where I have been failing to make any gains, really - my weight has stubbornly remained just below 60kg. And I have definitely not been consistent enough with eating more - I've made a bit of an effort, but I still miss breakfast far too frequently. I'm eating larger portions for lunch/dinner, and I've started snacking in the afternoon if I'm going to be eating dinner late, which should help a bit, but I do need to more reliably get breakfast every day.

I'll try deadlift on Saturday, when I have the gym to myself and can take my time. Is the advice that you should wear long socks and trousers instead of shorts accurate? I'll need to buy a tracksuit or something if so.

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Nath
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby Nath » Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:23 am UTC

The whole 'breakfast is the most important meal of the day' thing has little basis in fact. Get enough food in over the course of a day; it matters very little how you time it.

It's helpful to wear long socks and/or sweatpants when pulling from the floor, but it's not essential. I wear shorts and regular socks; I've scraped my shins up a couple of times over the years, but it usually doesn't happen. More important is the choice of footwear: a thin, non-squishy sole is important. You can even deadlift barefoot in a pinch, but don't wear running shoes.

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philsov
Not a fan of Diane Kruger
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby philsov » Tue Apr 16, 2013 1:47 pm UTC

Is the advice that you should wear long socks and trousers instead of shorts accurate?


Either/or. Especially if you're learning form. For me the banging was more on the area just below the knee as opposed to the actual shin region; a bit of cloth helps. And, yeah, if you had to pick footwear is more important than legwear. I wear a cheap pair of Converse fwiw.

I'll also second what Nath said; either practice with 60 kg or go lighter and then ELEVATE the bar up to the height where it would be if it were 60 kg (stack a few weights under both sides of the bar, if nothing else is available). If the bar is too low you're prone to lower back rounding and that's not a good thing; you want to learn how to do it correctly and that bar height is the standard.
The time and seasons go on, but all the rhymes and reasons are wrong
I know I'll discover after its all said and done I should've been a nun.

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nightbird
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Re: Gym use advice

Postby nightbird » Fri Apr 19, 2013 11:14 am UTC

Adacore wrote:Weight is the main area where I have been failing to make any gains, really - my weight has stubbornly remained just below 60kg. And I have definitely not been consistent enough with eating more - I've made a bit of an effort, but I still miss breakfast far too frequently.


My personal secret: mix two cups of raw oats with some fruit and three cups of yogurt, eat it at some point during the day. That's almost 1,00kcal.
“Human beings make life so interesting. Do you know, that in a universe so full of wonders, they have managed to invent boredom.”


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