Homeschooling

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zenten
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Homeschooling

Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:16 pm UTC

Ok, I have my first kid on the way, and we're been talking about the future. We both really like the idea of homeschooling. The only reason we wouldn't is if we can't afford to have one person stay at home.

However, there are a huge number of resources on how to do this, many of which contradictory, and most of which have a strong fundy bias. So, any advice you can give?

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:20 pm UTC

Take them to social events. Some homeschoolers I've met have almost no social skills and do not understand how to communicate with others in the real world.

Otherwise, go wild on algebra in 1st grade and calculus by the end of elementary schooling.

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Postby Phenriz » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:21 pm UTC

I spent summer here in Texas growing up. (where i'm from originally everyone went to public/private schools almost no one was home-schooled) Across the street from me there were 2 brothers around my age both of whom were home-schooled. They were nice kids, but had few social skills. On top of that i think the main reason for their homeschooling was religion and sheltering them from the ills of society. It was a hardcore southern baptist environment, No books/movies about magic, no violence etc etc etc.

Now i doubt you child would be in such an environment i'm just saying that's my experience with it.

I feel those things (religious indoctrination and sheltering)in combination can be a powder keg, on top of the fact that unless you keep your child active in some local team sports their social abilities won't be nearly as adequate as those who attend normal schools.

If i had the resources, i'm not sure what i'd do, but i feel that social interaction especially at an early age when they need to grow accustomed to other human beings is key.


If you're dead set on home-schooling introduce religion(not just christianity) when they're maybe 7 or 8 years old and encourage discourse. It's your child so this is just advice, but try to approach the home-schooling as a way for you to properly educate your child without having to deal with the inadequate systems in place.

The one true benefit that homeschooling offers that traditional schools do not, is that if your child has ambitions for a certain calling early on in life, you can nurture those ambitions early on instead of when they have spare time in highschool/college.
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Postby Dibley » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:28 pm UTC

I was homeschooled, and I think it can be really helpful, but as has been mentioned, make sure they develop some sort of social skills. I lived out in the country, so I sort of didn't entirely manage that bit, but I read science encyclopedias for entertainment, so I think it evened out a bit. Also, careful about homeschool conventions. It seems most of the organized homeschoolers are pretty hardcore fundamentalist.

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:32 pm UTC

Oh yes... watch that too. Apparently the conventions can get pretty bad, what with lack of social skills and evangelism. Not that religion is bad, but a mob brought together reinforcing each others beliefs... not the safest place to be.

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Postby Vaniver » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:34 pm UTC

If your primary reason for wanting to homeschool is to pass on a specific skill (for example, you know a lot of math and want your child to be doing calculus in middle school), homeschooling is unnecessary. Tell your school you would like your child to do independent study in that area; teach them at whatever accelerated pace they can handle. If you want to prepare them for college, try to make it as much of a "read the book, practice, ask questions to clear up what you don't know" thing as possible. (This is what I did for math until I hit the boundary of my parent's knowledge, then it was back to regular math classes, a few grades ahead)

If your primary reason for wanting to homeschool is a dislike of the public schooling system, you're going to need a full-time tutor. This does not have to be one of you/your spouse. Compare the costs of several private schools in your region, the cost of a tutor, and the amount of money you could make if you worked as something other than a tutor for your child. My guess is that private school will be your cheapest option, then yourself, then a tutor, although I may have mispriced tutors (they aren't that common anymore).

Social adjustment of the child is important, but another important problem is having to deal with your child as both a parent and a teacher. Will you be able to keep your child on track and keep the sort of relationship you want with your child?
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Postby Cuton » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:42 pm UTC

I think due to my experience in public school, if I am to have children later on, I probably would not send them to public school (especially if they show any signs of being gifted like I was. I heard a quote: "In any large society, public education will be mediocre much the same way food from a cafeteria is"[sic, referenceless] I think it quite accurately describes my feelings.

As to helping you out for resources: Talk to your local librarian I would think. They have access to/superior knowledge of large quantities of books and may have insights on this subject and useful books.

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Postby lesliesage » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:43 pm UTC

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Postby ArchangelShrike » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:45 pm UTC

I would say that ineffective/"average learning rate" public schooling can be countered with an effective independent study outside of school, as Vaniver said. But this eats up more time that could be used for other activities such as team sports, social events.... It's a trade off. Or there's private schooling, if you can afford it, or other options.

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Postby Narsil » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:47 pm UTC

Yeah, I was homeschooled for a bit too, and I have to say, bad idea.
You learn a lot, but you miss out on vital skills for interacting with others.
At the very least, make sure they go to kindergarten, elementary, and middle schools. They really, really need to meet kids and learn to deal with the shit of the world in that time.
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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:49 pm UTC

Part of my reasoning is that well, I hated public school. It was a waste of time, and most of what I "learnt" about socialization was actually harmful for dealing with mature adults. And I've realized lately that I actually went to really "good" public schools too.

So, considering how much the system is going downhill, it really seems like it would be a good option. We could go for private schools I suppose, but I'm not convinced that they are really much better than public schools.

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Postby Cuton » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:50 pm UTC

I think what could work is homeschooling your kid and running an afterschool daycare for non homeschooled kids. My mum had a daycare until I was out of grade school and having friends and non-friends to play with after school for 2-3 hours was fun.

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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:50 pm UTC

At the very least, make sure they go to kindergarten, elementary, and middle schools. They really, really need to meet kids and learn to deal with the shit of the world in that time.


Elementary and middle schools are what I'm trying to avoid though. Considering that when I was in that at least I got maybe 2 hours a day at most of useful socializing with my peers, I would think that I could do just as well with homeschooling my kid.

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Postby Cuton » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:52 pm UTC

I think that there would be many ways of getting social interaction while homeschooling. Most places where you do volunteer work are very sociable and they are usually happy to have people show up and bring their kids. (hospital could double as learning!)

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Postby lesliesage » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:02 pm UTC

zenten wrote:most of what I "learnt" about socialization was actually harmful for dealing with mature adults.

How can you argue with logic like that?

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Postby Vaniver » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:04 pm UTC

lesliesage wrote:
zenten wrote:most of what I "learnt" about socialization was actually harmful for dealing with mature adults.

How can you argue with logic like that?
First-hand personal experiences are hard to counteract with second-hand personal experiences. Statistics, perhaps?
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Postby cathrl » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:13 pm UTC

Don't even think of deciding now, because it absolutely depends on the kid whether it will work or not.

I've got one who won't listen to me if I say that 1+1=2. Mum is always wrong. Mum's not a proper teacher. Will not learn from me, period. She's done very well in school and loves it. It's not a particularly great school, either.

And her little brother who would happily never go to school again and butts heads with every teacher who tries to get him to do something he already understands. If I show him how to do something, he'll listen, ask questions, then go away and practice it. He'd do very well academically being homeschooled.

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Postby (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻ » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:30 pm UTC

As much as I do my best to not be judgemental, I have had some seriously bad experiences dealing with homeschooled kids. I went to a public school. I was a loser, I didn't get the best education, and I didn't make a lot of friends I thought were worth keeping. Some of those friends were kids who had been homeschooled, and spent high school among the ranks of public school kids. These kids scared the crap out of me. I have never met someone so socially retarded, and yet so arrogant and self-important, as one particular homeschooled guy. So I'm terribly biased. But all I can say is two things-
1) if you homeschool your kid, make sure they make friends OUTSIDE of their social circle. They shouldn't just be hanging out with other homeschooled kids reading sci-fi all day, because they'll never learn how to interact with real human beings.
2) Make sure you're up to it. Seeing kids who were homeschooled come into public school and suddenly have to be two grades behind what they thought they were is not fun. It wasn't particularly awesome for the kid, as you can imagine.
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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:40 pm UTC

First-hand personal experiences are hard to counteract with second-hand personal experiences. Statistics, perhaps?


The problem with that is we're talking about people that have a good chance of being like me. From what I can understand, there are no statistics regarding the experiences of kids like me in public school.

1) if you homeschool your kid, make sure they make friends OUTSIDE of their social circle. They shouldn't just be hanging out with other homeschooled kids reading sci-fi all day, because they'll never learn how to interact with real human beings.


Good point, and that definitely is the plan.

2) Make sure you're up to it. Seeing kids who were homeschooled come into public school and suddenly have to be two grades behind what they thought they were is not fun. It wasn't particularly awesome for the kid, as you can imagine.


Yeah, I'm going to have to come up with objective ways to make sure that homeschool is actually working, because I've noticed there's a tendancy for parents to think that their kids are little geniuses.

Don't even think of deciding now, because it absolutely depends on the kid whether it will work or not.


I'm not deciding now, but I can see how that would look that way from my initial post. I figure by the time the kid is five I should have a good idea on how good I am at teaching my child. I just like planning stuff in advanced, even if there's no guarantee that the plan will ever happen.

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Postby Belial » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:41 pm UTC

zenten wrote:The problem with that is we're talking about people that have a good chance of being like me.


Don't count on it.

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Postby TheTankengine » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:45 pm UTC

My best advice would be to send the child to public school in the suburbs of a well funded county in your state.
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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:48 pm UTC

Don't count on it.


Personality traits will typically be 50% in common with their parents based on genetics, and another 10% based on how their raised. Since it's a controlled environment, I could see it being a bit higher. Sure that's no guarantee, but it's a high enough chance to plan for it.

My best advice would be to send the child to public school in the suburbs of a well funded county in your state.


Americentric much?

Seriously, the curriculum is determined by the province in Ontario, and we aren't to happy with it (stupid Mike Harris).

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Postby Alisto » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:29 pm UTC

I'm a reasonably intelligent person and was always in the "gifted" classes in school. That being said, I say public school is the way to go, unless you're in a really dangerous area.

It would seem that educationally-speaking, home schooling is probably the better way to go. But I think the lack of social interaction outweighs that benefit, especially since you can always supplement education at home. There's nothing keeping you from teaching your child more advanced math or different science topics at home. But replacing the social interaction that one would get from attending school is much more difficult.
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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:32 pm UTC

It would seem that educationally-speaking, home schooling is probably the better way to go. But I think the lack of social interaction outweighs that benefit, especially since you can always supplement education at home. There's nothing keeping you from teaching your child more advanced math or different science topics at home. But replacing the social interaction that one would get from attending school is much more difficult.


How is it more difficult? Most of school isn't about engaging in social interaction.

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Postby Belial » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:35 pm UTC

Most of school isn't about engaging in social interaction.


Ummm?

I disagree?

Most of what I learned in school was how to deal with people, both peers and superiors.

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Postby zenten » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:38 pm UTC

Ummm?

I disagree?

Most of what I learned in school was how to deal with people, both peers and superiors.


Really? I find the social dynamics of both to be too different to be any use in the real world.

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Postby lesliesage » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:47 pm UTC

zenten wrote:I find the social dynamics of both to be too different to be any use in the real world.

Where on Earth do you think the real world came from?

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Postby joeframbach » Thu Jun 28, 2007 9:53 pm UTC

zenten wrote:...based on how their raised.
This is what public school does to people.

Anyway, I think a major reason for most people to be pro-public school is because most people attended public school. I attended public school and I turned out TV.

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Postby Roun » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:16 pm UTC

Okay, I'm going to say, I was in a similar situation as you. In 9th grade, I hated my high school. I hardly made any friends, most of the school was full of idiots, and I generally had a bad experience.

So, I asked my mother if I could try homeschooling. She was a stay-at-home mom, and she was already homeschooling my little brother. So, I tried homeschool for a year.

Let me tell you. WORST MISTAKE OF MY ENTIRE LIFE THUS FAR.

It was awful. I was completely bored the entire time. I only had myself to speak to. I made a little friend in my head that I talked to for a year.

Socials were once every two weeks, for two hours. Only 6 other kids were there. I never got any of their names; we just didn't have that long to interact.

You can never understand how much of your social interaction comes from school. I've seen people say they have "like, no friends". No friends? Hah! Try homeschooling for a year. You don't know the meaning of loneliness until you do.

Don't do it.

Don't do it.

Don't do it.

Happily back in highschool, and not complaining at all.

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Postby Alisto » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:34 pm UTC

I now have a problem with this thread. It seems to me that someone is asking for advice on a situation. One would assume the reason to ask for others' advice is to get a variety of information from people with different experiences. However, every bit of advice is countered with, "Well that doesn't match up with with my personal experience, so you're wrong."

zenten wrote:most of what I "learnt" about socialization was actually harmful for dealing with mature adults.


I see what you mean.
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Postby Leliel » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:41 pm UTC

Hiya!

I was in a public school for K-7th grades, homeschooled for 8th grade, then went to a math/science magnet school for 9th-12th.

My younger brother was homeschooled for 2nd - 12th grades. My parents' reasoning was akin to yours- that the local public school system was inadequate. Alabama has traditionally held the unenviable title of "Second Worst in Education in the U.S.," right behind Mississippi.

I personally did not like being homeschooled, I think 8th grade was too late to pull me out of public schools. I missed out on taking Spanish and there were no kids in my age group in my neighborhood, or my church. (I was however, very glad not to be in a standard public high school!)

By contrast, the local homeschool group (frequently homeschoolers in an area will meet up together for PE-like activities, field trips, etc.) did always have other kids near my brother's age. He also played sports in the city-sponsored leagues and never really lacked for social interaction.

Personally, I think that if you are able to afford the time and resources to do it, that homeschooling is an excellent opportunity. It can be a challenge to find resources that aren't geared towards fundamentalist Christians but they do exist and you are not restricted to the prepackaged curriculum. Also, yes, you may have to make an effort to make sure your child receives adequate social interaction, but this is hardly an insurmountable obstacle. I think that one of the reasons my brother's interaction level differed from mine was that I was already accustomed to receiving most of my interaction through school-related activities.

Alisto wrote:...There's nothing keeping you from teaching your child more advanced math or different science topics at home. But replacing the social interaction that one would get from attending school is much more difficult.

I would tend to disagree. Teaching advanced math at home may mean your child is now bored and restless in math class, and in an average sized city or suburb there are plenty municipal sources of social interaction.

Also, if you haven't already, you may want to check into finding a Canadian equivalent to the HSLDA - sometimes the laws regarding homeschooling can be peculiar.

Just my $0.02,
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(P.S. I don't know what curricula you're considering but I despised the popular Saxom math text for Algebra at least- far too few problems on the current topic to really reinforce the teaching. When my brother got to Algebra, I made up additional problems for him. Usually involving soccer players or super mario characters. ^_^)

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Re: Homeschooling

Postby Jauss » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:57 pm UTC

Dude, I learned many of my real social skills when I left school. I hung out with adults (in much more respectful capacities) and little kids and all sorts of people instead of just those within 3 years of me. And as for the socialization issue, I just have to laugh. My social life got ridiculously better after starting to unschool/homeschool. (Obviously if one lives in a sparsely populated area socialization will be a bigger issue and involve more effort.)

The home-schoolers I know are some of the most socially adept people I've encountered, which makes me wonder if the home-schoolers a lot of you have mentioned were the kind that really did pretty much just stay at home all day instead of going out and exploring/taking part in the outside world, or the kind doing it for isolationist reasons. If so, that makes a huge difference.

I have so much to say about this topic because it's been a really big deal in my life, but I'm feeling kind of frustrated after reading a lot of the other posts, so I don't think I can do a good job right now.

zenten wrote:Ok, I have my first kid on the way, and we're been talking about the future. We both really like the idea of homeschooling. The only reason we wouldn't is if we can't afford to have one person stay at home.

However, there are a huge number of resources on how to do this, many of which contradictory, and most of which have a strong fundy bias. So, any advice you can give?


My advice to you is to talk to Nancy Friedland. She's involved with a cool homeschool association, is the mother of two of my friends, and an all around great person who knows a lot about the issues you face and can give you better contacts and much more information about being a homeschooling parent than I can. I'll PM you her email address.
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Postby Castaway » Thu Jun 28, 2007 11:53 pm UTC

At the risk of sounding redundant, don't do it.
There is a high risk that your child will be socially damaged in some way. Also, there may be some areas that you may not necessarily be qualified to teach. Also, you may be underestimating how much time you will want to spend with your child. As you are describing it, you want to teach your kids some things in an accelerated way, but you can do that on top of homeschooling. Seriously, it'd be much better for them. Also you can't necessarily "make sure" that they have a social life, it's really a little more complicated than that.
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Postby Jauss » Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:47 am UTC

Castaway wrote:Also, there may be some areas that you may not necessarily be qualified to teach. Also, you may be underestimating how much time you will want to spend with your child.


Homeschooling doesn't have to mean that the parents teach the kid everything themselves or that the kid is only with their parents all day.

Most homeschooling parents are not professional teachers and after the kids are done with the elementary stuff (and sometimes before then) they usually find other sources of instruction. Mentors, tutors, and other folks knowledgeable in a given area, homeschooling groups, online and other correspondence classes, or taking a class or two at a middle school or high school. I also know a number of people who started taking community college courses at 13 or 14. Then there's the autodidacts who mostly teach themselves. Most folks do a combination of these.

When the kids are young they'll spend a lot of time with their parents or other family members/close family friends (and maybe also with a homeschooling group or tutor or whatever), but when they get into the latter single digit years and beyond there are more outside activities and groups and such to be part of without their parents having to be there. Then as pre-teens/teens kids can do things on their own: go to the library, take more advanced classes, volunteer, find apprenticeships, get jobs, travel.

A lot of it is just making an effort to find out what resources are available instead of expecting it all to just come to you. And being creative. Which are good things to do both inside and outside of the school system.

Homeschooling can and will suck if you do it completely passively. If you don't go out and meet people or follow up on your interests or explore what your city (or other city you can live in for a while) has to offer. If you only study what you're "supposed" to in dull ways and not use that gift of time and freedom for awesome. If you (or in the case of young kids, their parents) aren't up to that, then school of one kind or another is probably best.

If you are though, the education garnered will be fucking sweet.
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Postby EvanED » Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:57 am UTC

zenten wrote:
It would seem that educationally-speaking, home schooling is probably the better way to go. But I think the lack of social interaction outweighs that benefit, especially since you can always supplement education at home. There's nothing keeping you from teaching your child more advanced math or different science topics at home. But replacing the social interaction that one would get from attending school is much more difficult.


How is it more difficult? Most of school isn't about engaging in social interaction.


How isn't it? That's almost *all we did* in preschool and kindergarden (this was a montessori school which may have made a difference, but I was in public school in 1st grade), and a lot of what we did in the first couple grades.

It got less over time of course, but there was still plenty of interaction during the school day.

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Postby Phenriz » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:25 am UTC

my last two years of highschool were strictly a social expirement, and my cumulative GPA proves it ;)
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Postby tessuraea » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:38 am UTC

Hmmmm, my experiences are also not in line with many of you. I wonder if region has something to do with this?

I went to public school. I was mistreated badly by the school system and by the other kids--it was a nightmare, honestly. I'm kind of surprised I didn't kill myself. So I'm a bit twitchy about public school systems.

But even discounting that as much as I can--I know plenty of people whose experiences of school weren't horrible or were even good--my interactions with kids who were homeschooled have all been positive. I hired a 16-year-old homeschooler once; she was working part-time to learn about pro-social action while also saving money for a trip to visit her Dutch relatives. She was mature, responsible, while still being an absolute joy to be around; she was confident but not arrogant, friendly but not overbearing.

When I was younger I knew other kids who were being homeschooled. They were just kids, but unlike a lot of the other kids, they weren't mean to me.

One of my profs has done a study of homeschooling in this area--I think it might actually be different than in a lot of places. For one thing, it's not usually religiously based at all; for another, the parents have organized and share resources a lot. Also, Maine has a really high level of civic involvement, and the parents of homeschoolers are more involved in general--so their kids are active in various organizations or charities.

My professor said that he was surprised by the lack of evidence of problems with social skills at all in the group he sampled.

Anyone interested, I think this is the article with the statistics in it--he's also done work focusing on homeschooling as a social movement:

Collom, Ed. 2005. "The Ins and Outs of Homeschooling," Education & Urban Society 37.3:307-335.
Last edited by tessuraea on Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:39 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby zenten » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:39 am UTC

I now have a problem with this thread. It seems to me that someone is asking for advice on a situation. One would assume the reason to ask for others' advice is to get a variety of information from people with different experiences. However, every bit of advice is countered with, "Well that doesn't match up with with my personal experience, so you're wrong."


I was asking for advice on how to homeschool. What I got for the most part was "don't homeschool". It's that type of thing I was giving the reaction to.

Roun: At the very least that explains how *not* to homeschool your kid. And I wouldn't be starting out a kid at the age of 12, that would be nuts in my opinion.

lesliesage wrote:Where on Earth do you think the real world came from?


Most were in the regular school system, yes. But knowing how to associate with someone at the age of 10, or with a teacher, is not the same thing at all as dealing with a coworker or a boss.

Jauss: Thanks, I'll check her out.

Castaway wrote:There is a high risk that your child will be socially damaged in some way.


I'm not convinced on that. Most of the examples I've seen of poor socialization are in places of low population density, and from fundies with wacky concepts of how the world works. Neither of which will be true for my kids.

Castaway wrote:Also, there may be some areas that you may not necessarily be qualified to teach.


I have a firm grasp of everything below grade 11 with the exceptions of french and visual art, and my spouse has a good grasp of those two areas (along with many others). I'm also fairly good with most things above that grade (that still fits under highschool), and there are other options at that point.

Castaway wrote:Also, you may be underestimating how much time you will want to spend with your child.


That I'm definitely not convinced on. But if I do end up getting sick of my kid, I can always put them into the public school system. Actually, if I come across any insurmountable problems I should be able to do that.

Castaway wrote:As you are describing it, you want to teach your kids some things in an accelerated way, but you can do that on top of homeschooling.


Actually, I want to teach my kids at their own pace. It's just that if they're anything like my partner and I that will be faster than the pace of public school. Plus, that will just make them even more bored in class, which isn't good for anyone.

Castaway wrote:Also you can't necessarily "make sure" that they have a social life, it's really a little more complicated than that.


How so? At the very least I can do what the public school system does, stick them with a bunch of kids around the same age from the same general geographic region, and let them sort out how to interact.

EvanED wrote:How isn't it? That's almost *all we did* in preschool and kindergarden (this was a montessori school which may have made a difference, but I was in public school in 1st grade), and a lot of what we did in the first couple grades.


Ok, the preschool thing, I can still do that if I want. Although if one of us is going to be staying home with the kids anyway I don't see the point of daycare. Kindergarden is just a way to get the kid ready for school. Setting up a similar environment on my own shouldn't be difficult. As to grade 1 and on, no, it was mostly classwork that I was doing. Obviously things could have been different where you went to school of course.

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Postby SecondTalon » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:43 am UTC

I hated High School. Well, that's not true.. I hated all of school. I hated my peers for having to ask questions about mind-numbingly simple things that I completely understood the first time. I hated how, in a class of less than 140 people, social circles became so convoluted and complex that they became nigh-impossible to track without years of experience. I hated how half the teachers were clearly phoning it in, while another good portion clearly hated us bastards and were there for the paycheck.

And the food.. every time I moved up.. from Primary to Elementary, Middle to High, I couldn't possibly see how the food could get worse... and it always did.

I dealt with the stupid, the ignorant, and the willfully ignorant on a daily basis. The latter group still sticks with me.. people who chose to remain ignorant, people who actively sought to be stupid. I met drug dealers, drug users, "God Fearin' Christian Folk" who would fuck anything that breathed, chicks labled whores because they gave one guy a handjob in a car, and all manner of the children of the dregs of Small Town, USA. I know the children of the afluent, and the kids of the middle classes.

And as much as I hate it, I'll be damned if I'm not a better person for having to learn to deal with all of their shit just to make it through the day. I learned how to insult a superior without them knowing, how to quickly and efficiently finish my work, tell my peers to bugger off and do their own work politely, and how to profit off the work of my peers without them knowing. No, not cheating on tests... group assignments, mostly. Delegation is a wonderful thing. I learned to work with shiftless layabouts, ernest but stupid folk, and so on.

Hell, I got to see firsthand what happens to otherwise intelligent people who abuse chemical substances, just how bad off one can be after a car wreck and still be alive, how badly brain damage can screw with a person, and so on. Experiences I'd never have had if I were homeschooled.

So, yeah, as much as I hated it and still hate it, I wouldn't have had it any other way. Besides, hate's good peoplefuel.

Ah, well. No big loss on my part if someone homeschools their kid.
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Postby fjafjan » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:45 am UTC

Most were in the regular school system, yes. But knowing how to associate with someone at the age of 10, or with a teacher, is not the same thing at all as dealing with a coworker or a boss.


So?
It's a matter of learning, if you can't talk to peers when you are ten you might not have learned when you are twenty, and unlikly when you are ten, most people DO know at that point.

Me I would never homeschool my kids, I would probably TEACH them things, but that would be complimentary. It's basically what my dad did, it worked out pretty well I think.
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