Homeschooling

The school experience. School related queries, discussions, and stories that aren't specific to a subject.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
Jarne
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2007 3:52 pm UTC
Contact:

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Jarne » Fri Mar 07, 2008 12:05 am UTC

Infornographer wrote:(Note: this letter comes from the perspective that you eventually would like your child to have the ability to pursue higher education)

I would definitely recommend sending them to an actual school (public, private, or even magnet) but giving them advanced tutoring in specific areas of their interest.


Pursuing higher education has been done easily by plenty of homeschoolers I know. Last year alone, two homeschooled friends of mine went to Berklee college of music, one to Brandies, and another kid in the community moved up to Canada at the age of sixteen after he was accepted into a University there. This year, all of my homeschooling friends got accepted into their first choice college. I went through the admissions process but haven't heard back from the school I applied to (stupid rolling admission), but the process itself wasn't that hard. I took several SAT Subject tests (Physics, Bio E, Literature) and the PSATs to give them some high numbers to look at, worked my ass off on the essays and filled out a "high school" course list as best I could. The admissions office had dealt with homeschoolers before and were easy to deal with. Basically, it isn't that much harder to apply than it is if you're in a normal high school.

Being homeschooled, I'm also considering the non-traditional option of not going to college right after graduation and instead doing a thorough study of Greek and sixteenth-seventeenth century English literary classics, doing a quick review of biology and studying the basics of electrical engineering with a tutor. Or I could travel around the country and stay with the various friends I have in most states since, being homeschooled, the majority of my social contacts are not within twenty miles of me.

Infornographer wrote:As for how to go about homeschooling, I would strongly recommend implementing curricula from Stanford's EPGY as well as from the Advanced Placement programs. Universities need some sort of thing by which to measure a child's accomplishments.

I didn't enjoy my experience with Stanford's EPGY program, but it was only one class. I'd also recommend against Keystone National High School, but that was only two classes. I do agree with you, though, that Universities need some standardized way to measure a homeschooled applicant. If you are going to homeschool, teach your kid how to take tests and make sure they take some sort of yearly standardized test. And the PSATs, SATs, SAT subject tests or the ACTs or some other equivalent. And community college classes. Give the colleges as many numbers as you possibly can.

User avatar
aleflamedyud
wants your cookies
Posts: 3307
Joined: Tue Oct 09, 2007 7:50 pm UTC
Location: The Central Bureaucracy

Re: Homeschooling

Postby aleflamedyud » Fri Mar 21, 2008 3:43 am UTC

Did I already post here? Don't think so.

I spent 9th-10th grade pushing to be home-schooled, and 11th-12th grades actually home-schooled. I live in one of the most white-bread, repressive school districts around. When I look on my HS Facebook network I note that people have moved out of the country to get away from Bethlehem, NY. My education was not a religious one.

First lesson: don't fuck up your grades while trying to get your parents to home-school if that's what you want. It only hindered my college applications later on. Instead of going to one of the best schools, I'm in a merely pretty darned good school (UMass Amherst, for the record, with honors and a merit scholarship).

Home-schooling worked for me because I'm a largely self-directed and goal-motivated person. In addition, my family had the money to hire help or external classes in subjects where I needed them, and my EE stepfather was able to help me with math. If parents can't commit to helping home-school, the kid has to put in even more effort.

The biggest actual challenge was getting into college. I had to type up multiple essays, my own transcript, and a resume. But those merely helped. The big key to getting into uni, tech school, college or whatever as a home-schooler is: have standardized test scores. Lots of them. Have SATs, PSATs, SAT 2s, and preferably a couple of APs under your belt. These are objective numbers that show a prospective how you measure up to something they know. Keep something you can call grades, and use them to compile a GPA that you can submit for financial-aid purposes.

Overall, know what you're doing and who you are.

This post presumes an American audience since I don't know any other country with home-schooling laws as liberal as ours. No, really.
"With kindness comes naïveté. Courage becomes foolhardiness. And dedication has no reward. If you can't accept any of that, you are not fit to be a graduate student."

User avatar
Pseudomammal
Honored just to be nominated
Posts: 221
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2007 7:42 am UTC
Location: PDX
Contact:

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Pseudomammal » Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:06 am UTC

I realize I'm way late to the thread, but...

PictureSarah wrote:I have met kids on the brink of going off to college who were homeschooled their entire lives, and they are dangerously naive about the world.


My experience was just the opposite. When I went off to college, it was after several years of homeschooling where I was already out in the world, traveling, reading, holding down jobs, talking to people of all ages, noticing world events, and learning to take care of myself and live on my own. Not because my parents weren't there for me -- my parents were great -- but because, unlike my friends in public school, I had the freedom and time to learn these things gradually and safely, instead of one day moving all my stuff from my bedroom to a dorm room and being told lifelong constraints on my behavior were suddenly, magically lifted.

Freshman year I found myself surrounded by "normal" schooled kids who had no idea how to handle all that freedom, and a lot of them self-destructed marvelously. They may have known more AP calculus than I did, but I knew how to not spend every night drinking until I passed out just because I could. I knew how to make a food budget last a month, how to wash my own clothes, and how to talk to adults like an adult. Self-determination was entirely alien to them. Like stray animals suddenly given a reliable bowl of food, they gorged themselves constantly as if their right to make terrible decisions might disappear at any moment.

By senior year most of them worked things out, but it was painful to watch, and the ones that didn't make it really didn't make it. I, on the other hand, transitioned comfortably to adulthood -- sex, booze, responsibilities, commitments, and all -- with no scars or regrets. Most of the college-going homeschoolers I know had similar experiences.

High school is not the real world. Public school and responsible adulthood share a preponderance of assholes and mindless bureaucracies, but there ends the similarity. Most of the jerks and hurdles grownups have to face are optional. You can pick your passions and your battles. Public school might do a better job than homeschooling preparing one for the worst in life -- or at least the most tedious -- but how much is that really worth? If you've trained to be a cog in a machine, you're qualified to be ... a cog in a machine. Homeschoolers can learn to to socialize by socializing. They can learn to take care of themselves by doing it. They don't learn to shut up and do their busy work because fuck that shit.

I hope it's clear I'm not advocating the paranoid shut-in kind of homeschooling. Like high schoolers, those kids are woefully unprepared for the big scary world. I'm championing the kind where, instead of spending all day trapped in school, kids get to -- carefully, with supervision at first -- go do things in the big scary world.
Stop him! He's supposed to die!

User avatar
Sungura
When life gives you banananas, make bananana bread
Posts: 3928
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 2:32 am UTC
Location: AL

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Sungura » Sat Mar 22, 2008 2:35 am UTC

Hey I saw this thread a while back and meant to reply, then got busy with biochem and forgot LOL.

Anyway, I think homeschooling is terrific. I will say it doesn't always work well, but if done right, I think it's awesome. I was homeschooled from when I was super young (like pre pre-K) and wanted to learn to read until 7th grade. 7th grade was the start of my public school career so I did get the both worlds, but seemly opposite of a lot of people here who posted their experience. The reason I had to go to public school is my parents divorced and my father (who's idea it was in the first place to homeschool) decided he didn't want my mom having "extra" time with me and my bro during the day for school and took it to court and of course won because the gov't isn't going to want us homeschooled.

My mom taught my brother and I very well. She didn't have a teaching degree or anything, so don't be afraid if you don't. There are TONS of resources out there. And one good thing you might want to going is the HSLDA (home school legal defense association) which will help you if for some reason your state ever wants to get you into trouble for homeschooling, etc. Some states are worse than others and more legal loopholes to jump through. But anyway, back to the schooling itself. My mom created her own curriculum so it was much more interesting, she used a mish-mosh of stuff instead of one specific course pack (Like using all BJU, or all Abeka, etc). In fact, it was really funny when my 7th grade science class we used the EXACT SAME books that I used in the 4th grade :lol: Of course, that made a super-easy science year for me. I was three years ahead of the class.

Once I got into public school, there are a few things I immediately noticed:
1) No interaction with people outside your age. This is totally unlike the real world when you deal with peers, those younger than you, and those older/elders. Whereas when I was homeschooled, I not only interacted with my peers but also various age ranges.
2) I was really held back. A lot. I had to go super-slow like the whole rest of the class. I was used to setting my own pace (which, was usually quite fast!) but now I had to put the breaks on and be bored...and sit...and do nothing...and learned what I'd already learned years ago...and twiddle my thumbs. Although I learned that I could take the books and materials from my prior class to the next one, so I had no homework by the end of the day because I did the homework while bored in the next class :D High school was a touch better, but not much. It only worked out because I did it in a way that I could go to college my senior year of high school. I'm now graduating from college this May, but it's only my 3rd year. I'm used to a very rigorous schedule and with college I was able to do that once again. I take on average 21 credits a semester (6 classes) plus of course working almost full time. Finally, my pace again!

A major concern I see time after time after time is socialization. Yes, you can do this wrong. You can isolate your child from everyone. BUT YOU DON"T HAVE TO!! There are a LOT of organizations out there. Get them involved in sports. Get them in 4-H/FAA. Get them in youth groups at church. When I was homeschooled, I was on a soccer team, volleyball team, heavily involved in 4-H, worked at a day care, took gymnastic lessons, art classes, swimming lessons, was in the youth group at church, had friends over all the time, or went to friend's houses, and more! And not just other homeschoolers, but public/private/parochial school kids too. It's not an all-or-nothing thing.

In public school I guess the "socialization" differences I noticed was mostly the lack of discipline and respect on the part of the other students to their teachers. And then all the kissy-kissy let's make out in the hallway stuff (don't think this doesn't go on in middle school! I think the most unique place was a couple attempting to have sex between the soda machines) and don't say kids need to see that stuff not to be naive - so not true. I knew it existed, we weren't sheltered kids. That doesn't mean one needs to see it. And we went to public school in an excellent district very well ranked as one of the best in the whole area; it has an excellent reputation. It wasn't some backwater school district.

Another major concern I see is "how well is my child doing in comparison to the standard?" Well, there is a reason for standardized tests. My mom had my brother and I took them every two years. We were usually in the 97th percentile, give or take one. In MI, we have the "MEAP" test which is the standard public school testing. Homeschoolers ARE allowed to take these standardized tests! And, you can do PSAT, ACT, SAT, etc for college just like any other student. There are also schools that are recognized and allow homeschoolers to join, so you have to take certain courses, and you get official grades and GPA that colleges recognize because they are accredited. However you don't even have to do that. If you have good standardized scores, there usually isn't a problem. Homeschooling is becoming much more common and colleges in general are very open to homeschoolers. My brother didn't have any troubles getting into college even coming directly off of homeschooling. In fact, he even got a letter from Princeton asking him to apply!

My brother was held back horribly in public school - especially in math. They would not let him advance even though he passed placement tests with flying colors. So, he actually ended up getting his own lawyer and taking his own case to court to win homeschooling back in his sophomore year. (I was a senior and graduating, so it wasn't worth me trying to win it back). He actually won, and started right into calculus which is where he should have been. The summer between his sophmore and junior year he took multivariable calc. One would ask, how could my mom teach him at this level? What do you do when your child gets to where you can't teach them anymore because it's too above your own head? That's simple. There are other teachers, tutors, or college classes. We happen to live close to a university, so he went there for some classes. How much more "socialization" can you get than holding your own as a high school sophomore at a university? He was perfectly fine there. Much more at home on campus than at the high school.

Another great thing about homeschooling is that we learned to be self-starters and self-teachers. Meaning, we want to learn something, and we take initiative to learn it, and we know HOW to learn. That is something that is not taught in public schools: HOW to learn. Things are spoon-fed. If kids don't get it, they are screwed for the class and their grade and looked upon as stupid instead of seeing that everyone has their own learning style. If they get it, well, eventually they'll hit a point when the don't, and then they'll have no clue how to learn the material. My mom is a tutor now, as is my brother, and so I see it all of the time with their students. Their philosophy with tutoring centers a lot on how their students learn - helping them find that out. Learning should be fun, and sadly most kids don't see it that way because it's either just work, it's boring, or it's frustrating and depressing because they don't understand it. And that is very sad. My mom showed me HOW to learn, and she showed me how much fun learning was! My brother and I would not be where we are today if it was not for that. I'm just turned 21 graduating from college with a BS in biochem, accepted to every grad school I applied for. Purdue even accepted me into their neuroscience program without even asking me down for an interview!! And my brother is just turned 18 and already a junior in college double majoring in math and computer science. I think my mom did a damn good job :) And I honestly believe homeschooling is what set the foundation. I've always kept that foundation with me, and it's served me well.

All this being said, I recognize that not everyone will agree, and I will say homeschooling is not for everyone. I've met kids who were homeschooled who were in a completely different scenario than my brother and I were and so I've seen how it doesn't always work the best. Usually those are the ones that the parents did keep pretty much locked up in the house. So there is a lot with how you homeschool for if it works or not.

Anyway, I hope that helps. PM me if you are interested in more info. Or, I know my mom would love to talk about how she did it, if you are curious.

:D
"Would you rather fight a Sungura-sized spider or 1000 spider-sized Sunguras?" -Zarq
she/<any gender neutral>/snug

User avatar
fusillade2
Posts: 76
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:17 pm UTC
Location: North Carolina
Contact:

Re: Homeschooling

Postby fusillade2 » Thu May 14, 2009 6:27 am UTC

I'm almost done with my junior year. I must say, I do like being homeschooled. :shock:

User avatar
mdyrud
Posts: 205
Joined: Fri Jun 13, 2008 10:34 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby mdyrud » Thu May 14, 2009 2:10 pm UTC

Out of personal experience, I think that it is a good idea to let a kid decide if they want to go into the public schools. I was homeschooled all the way up to eighth grade, but switched to the public schools as a freshman. One of the main reasons was for socialization. Their was a pretty good sized support group in my area, but all of the kids were a good four to five years younger than me. That being said, if I lived in a more populated area rather than out in the country, I probably would have stayed with homeschooling. Teaching yourself calculus in eighth grade ftw!

User avatar
zombiefeynman
Posts: 211
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 4:16 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby zombiefeynman » Thu May 14, 2009 2:29 pm UTC

I was homeschooled until 8th grade, so I can say a few things.
  • There are, y'know, groups of people who homeschool. I had at least as many friends as I later found out people had in High School.
  • You can teach a child a lot more information in a lot less time. I didn't have to do anything in my Chemistry class, which was every day, for an hour, because in 8th grade my father had taught me chemistry on the weekends for about a half-hour to an hour a day. And he managed to teach me what I discovered was halfway into AP chemistry.
  • I loved being homeschooled, because of the free time. I got my schoolwork done in about two hours every day, and then I was done. So I read. I read all the time. And then when I got a computer, I learned/taught myself programming. (That changed when I got into school, because I didn't have any free time, even though I was learning at a slower rate.)
.
Then I got into school. I was shocked at how much time was wasted. In homeschooling, if you finish a test or assignment early, you go on to the next thing. In school, you wait for the slowest person to finish, or for time to run out. In homeschooling, if you understand a concept, you move on to the next one. In school, if you understand a concept, you wait for the slowest person to get the concept.

As I said, homeschooling provides a lot of peers, but I really dislike how much school focuses on social interaction. Being homeschooled probably had something to do with it, but I don't need to be around people 8 hours a day, 5 days a week, and I've found that a lot of kids do. They can't handle just being alone for a while.

The only problems I have with homeschooling are:
  • It ignores keeping maturity paced with knowledge, which means that you could have a kid who knows calculus and theoretical physics, but can't actually be around people with the same interests/knowledge.
  • There are a lot of parents who just don't teach their children. Homeschooling actually means instilling knowledge in a child, which doesn't really happen if you just let them watch TV all day.

I didn't really have a choice about going into school at 9th grade - my parents couldn't split their time between me and jobs anymore (though I realize now I could have taught myself most of it). They (as in, my mother) were kind of worried about my 'social skills,' which turned out to be a pretty lame worry - I had all the friends I wanted, and no one thought I was odd at all (except that I was a few years ahead in Math and Science because I liked those subjects).

User avatar
Ventanator
Posts: 158
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2009 10:22 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Ventanator » Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:35 am UTC

My little sister and I were homeschooled for one year by our mother. It was fourth grade and I'm now going into senior year, so I've had plenty of time to look back on it and think about it.

That year was the worst time of my life. You never realise exactly how much you and your parents don't get along until one is trying to make you do school work instead of playing Spyro or watch tv. We fought constantly. The books and things we had were all relegious based (we ordered like a homeschooling 'kit' that came with everything and told my mom what to do) and were way to hard. Well, that's what I thought then anyway. While I was being homeschooled, I also played baseball and football with the local teams and got plenty of social interaction ( I already knew all of these kids though).
Now, look back at how much I said I hated being homeschooled. It's true. The silver lining is there though. The next year I was put back in a private school (where I had went up until fourth grade) and they wanted to promote me a year. I declined because I was already a year younger than everyone else, but I like to use that to show just how much I learned. The biggest that I really remember is latitude and longitude - my peers at the high school I go to now (public) always have trouble with stuff I learned in the fourth grade. It just blows my mind...
So, homeschool is obviously good, right? Well...no...Math has always been my worst subject. The year I was homeschooled I was allowed to take it at my own pace (because my mom didn't know any of it and couldn't help, so we just had to figure it out if the book didn't explain it well enough) and my math suffered as a consequence. I remember being in a huddle during a football practice and everybody was making fun of me because I wasn't as good at math as them (wow, that's a weird memory), and I remember my dad being angry at me when my uncle and him asked me some math problems and I couldn't answer ('You're making it look like we ain't teachin' you shit boy!).

So, what I'm saying is, if you're qualified and feel that you and your kids could take it, then go ahead. Otherwise, just send them to a public school. I'm not incredibly gifted, which is probably why I feel this way (according to most of those 'incredibly gifted' minds), but I really like the slow paced school life laced liberally with social interaction with people I hate. On the first page (think it's first anyway) somebody talks about how he had to go through high school hating it, that's good for kids. I love my school, but some of the people just annoy me. I've learned to get over it though, and I'm even friends with a few of them...so, yeah, cast my vote with public school...

User avatar
TheTedinator
Posts: 62
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 6:43 am UTC
Location: Oregon

Re: Homeschooling

Postby TheTedinator » Thu Oct 08, 2009 9:50 pm UTC

I am in 9th grade and have always been homeschooled, and I can say that it is great! I don't think I am very lacking in social skills :P , and i've been involved in organized sports, have a lot of friends at my church, and I take a lot of classes with other homeschoolers here.

P.S. My dad is a public school teacher.

Bearboy
Posts: 103
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2008 5:10 am UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Bearboy » Thu Oct 22, 2009 7:49 am UTC

It's great to see some Home School success stories here.

I'm 16 and live in Sydney Australia. I have been in public schools my whole life and I couldn't homeschool for a few reasons:

Both parents work full time. So it would have been me on my own for my early years.
Good public schools in the area.
Parents beleived homeschooling would prevent University entry(Yet some of you guys claim it didn't effect you getting into College)
Parents didn't want to.

Another thing is I'm apparently smart. I got into the most exclusive selective school in the state and could choose any school. I choose not to go because of the extra work, the students(Surrended by Uber determined Asian students. No thanks) and my own behaviour. They would probably expect me to be well behaved, polite and all that shit. Despite my school marks I and I alone have stopped feildtrips to Parliment house(I swear I didn't know that guy was the Seargant at Arms), the local theme park and because of me their is now a "No abseiling off school buildings" rule.

Freshman year I found myself surrounded by "normal" schooled kids who had no idea how to handle all that freedom, and a lot of them self-destructed marvelously. They may have known more AP calculus than I did, but I knew how to not spend every night drinking until I passed out just because I could. I knew how to make a food budget last a month, how to wash my own clothes, and how to talk to adults like an adult. Self-determination was entirely alien to them. Like stray animals suddenly given a reliable bowl of food, they gorged themselves constantly as if their right to make terrible decisions might disappear at any moment.



Oh how I have seen that. "My parents are on holidays! PARTY!!!!!"

MisterCheif
Posts: 253
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 1:24 am UTC

Re:

Postby MisterCheif » Thu Oct 22, 2009 8:51 pm UTC

Jauss wrote:You know what my high school memories are? Fear and self-loathing and anxiety. Eating lunch by myself and not making eye contact.


Yet, this is not the case for everybody. So far at least, my high school years have been great. In middle school, I was somewhat isolated, with my only friends being some in the gifted program, and one or two in band. I was even more isolated in my last year of middle school, as a big portion of my friends in gifted had been in the year ahead of me, so, I did usually eat alone. But, it was not that bad.

But then, by the beginning of freshman year, I had made many more friends, just from marching band practices over the summer. I had people to sit with at lunch. I was no longer stuck in classes with people that really slowed down the class, and my life got better. High school is still good now, in my sophomore year, despite the fact that I was, and still kind of am, a shy person.

The point of this is, you can't base a decision like this on the experiences of others alone, as there are far to many differences between their life, and personality, and environment, and that of your child. It is most likely something best decided on based on where you live, how good of a school district you are in, and most importantly, the child's personality.

Disregard this advice if you want, as I am only still in high school, and there are most likely many flaws my ideas, as I have not experienced enough to know it more thoroughly.

Also, if you do choose to home-school, I would recommend contacting the school district you are located in to get your child/children involved in the band or choir program. I know that my school allows home schooled kids to be involved in the band and choir programs, although there are no home schooled people in band (despite the fact that band is clearly far more epic 8)). At least for me, being a very logical and mathematical person, band provides a great creative outlet. I think I would go crazy without having marching band, despite the fact that it takes up six hours a week, plus football games, and nearly all of a Saturday when we have a competition.

Like I said, feel free to disregard my advice if you feel I am to inexperienced for it to be reliable. I just felt the need to comment, seeing as how many people are using having a bad time in high school, or school in general, as a reason why you should never send your child to a public school.
I can haz people?
lulzfish wrote:Exactly. Playing God is a good, old-fashioned American tradition. And you wouldn't want to ruin tradition. Unless you hate America. And that would make you a Communist.

crystalclear
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:07 am UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby crystalclear » Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:21 am UTC

Homeschooling sucks. I was homeschooled from fifth grade until I started college. It was the worst idea ever. Public schools aren't great, but it's the lesser of two evils. Homeschooling left me completely unprepared for the world. If I can save someone from the potential horrors of homeschooling, my difficulty getting started in the world might have been worth it for me. I didn't (and still don't) know how to communicate with peers, and got stuck in some horrible relationships my first few years of college. THAT is what homeschooling does. It is not good AT ALL. I hated life when I was homeschooled. I hated every day of it. I contemplated suicide for years.
Don't homeschool your kids unless you want them to be suicidal and depressed their entire childhood.

Did I mention? I absolutely can't write a decent paper. English is not my mother's first language, so she never read anything I wrote. If she read it, she couldn't give feedback at all. It was just a "okay, Crystal, you did your homework" I knew more than her in every subject that I studied by the time I was 12. Although I learned to learn from books without a teacher, I didn't learn any of the material well.

Homeschooling should be outlawed unless the parents are proven to be competent in the subjects they intend to teach. It is required for professional teachers, and it should be required for parents. Otherwise, it is just an excuse for the parents to keep their kids away from other influences that might open their minds to the concept that not everybody is as narrow-minded as them.
Last edited by crystalclear on Tue Oct 27, 2009 9:36 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Vaniver
Posts: 9422
Joined: Fri Oct 13, 2006 2:12 am UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Vaniver » Tue Oct 27, 2009 2:06 am UTC

Why is "tailor the education to fit the child" a novel concept to some people?
I mostly post over at LessWrong now.

Avatar from My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, owned by Hasbro.

User avatar
Kendo_Bunny
Posts: 528
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:56 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:47 am UTC

^ Because people like to believe that their experiences are universal and that their response is the only sensible one.

Homeschooling worked for me for these reasons, which are hardly universal:

-I was bullied horrendously in public school.
-I learn better on my own, with occasional guidance on subjects that I don't understand.
-I am a rather introverted person by nature, and prefer large amounts of alone time. My socializing needs are rather easy to fill.
-I was too far ahead of my age group - my parents taught me reading, writing, and arithmetic (as well as history and science) very young, and continued supplementing all through school. I was bored in classes and my elementary school's math program was horrendous, so I re-learned how to do math incorrectly, to get the right answers on tests.
-I was a motivated learner until I realized how far ahead of my classes I was - I got lazy, because I only needed the barest amount of effort.

I would rather homeschool my own children. I believe our public school system needs an enormous overhaul and I don't really want to put my own kids in it until after that overhaul has happened. But, not every child is like I was and not every family is like mine was.

AtlasDrugged
Posts: 121
Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2008 3:11 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby AtlasDrugged » Wed Oct 28, 2009 3:45 pm UTC

Homeschooling should be outlawed unless the parents are proven to be competent in the subjects they intend to teach.


So because it didn't work for you, it should be banned? Typical liberal response, and absolutely pathetic (you then attacking homeschooling parents for being 'narrow-minded' was a particular highlight). Guess what, I went through the standard schooling system and I had difficulty forming meaningful relationships! Does that I mean I get to advocate mandatory homeschooling? No, because public policy shouldn't be based on whatever scars you have because diddums had parents who couldn't teach properly. Obviously if English isn't your mother's first language then she wouldn't have been able to read your papers, but surprisingly that isn't true of everyone in an Anglophone country (do I even need to go into how egocentric it is to assume that everyone is exactly like you?)!

American Idol-style sob stories and an instinctive reaction to ban anything you don't like are usually what passes for debate in News & Articles and Serious Business, don't infect this forum with them as well.

The Happy Genius
Posts: 33
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2009 4:17 am UTC
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Homeschooling

Postby The Happy Genius » Wed Oct 28, 2009 6:55 pm UTC

I have no real opinion on homeschooling, it definitely work in some cases, but is horrible in others.

But the thing people say against public school is the single most important thing I learned, that it's useless. I think you need to see the fail to realize you have to take control of your own education. It took me 6 years to realize this and grow up enough to be able to learn effectively again. The public school system, in a way, failed me, but I wouldn't have it any other way. I learned more about how useless people could be, and it set me up for my current career so well.

Really, I could always learn effectively, just the subjects I was learning were of no interest. My biology teacher got me to learn, he was great, no one else could. I had much more interest in working to pay for car parts.

IMO, the best way to take control of your childs education would be to augment their public schooling with tutoring/advanced study at home.

crystalclear
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:07 am UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby crystalclear » Wed Oct 28, 2009 11:28 pm UTC

AtlasDrugged wrote:
Homeschooling should be outlawed unless the parents are proven to be competent in the subjects they intend to teach.


So because it didn't work for you, it should be banned? Typical liberal response, and absolutely pathetic (you then attacking homeschooling parents for being 'narrow-minded' was a particular highlight). Guess what, I went through the standard schooling system and I had difficulty forming meaningful relationships! Does that I mean I get to advocate mandatory homeschooling? No, because public policy shouldn't be based on whatever scars you have because diddums had parents who couldn't teach properly. Obviously if English isn't your mother's first language then she wouldn't have been able to read your papers, but surprisingly that isn't true of everyone in an Anglophone country (do I even need to go into how egocentric it is to assume that everyone is exactly like you?)!

American Idol-style sob stories and an instinctive reaction to ban anything you don't like are usually what passes for debate in News & Articles and Serious Business, don't infect this forum with them as well.


I'm not saying all homeschooling should be banned, but if the parents are horribly incompetent, they should not be allowed to keep their children from learning things from other (and better) sources than them.
Of course it can be successful, but how do parents expect to be able to provide an education for their children if they can't even read the curriculum themselves? How are they supposed to teach their children to read and write, when they can barely speak the language enough to survive in the country? Not everyone who produces babies is qualified to teach. These unqualified people should not be allowed to keep children from an education. If you can prove that you are qualified, by all means, homeschool. The problem is, that people who are incompetent rarely know or admit that they are.

ThomasS
Posts: 585
Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:46 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby ThomasS » Thu Oct 29, 2009 10:21 am UTC

crystalclear wrote: I'm not saying all homeschooling should be banned, but if the parents are horribly incompetent, they should not be allowed to keep their children from learning things from other (and better) sources than them.

You aren't? So this would be somehow quoting out of context?
crystalclear wrote:Homeschooling sucks. I was homeschooled from fifth grade until I started college. It was the worst idea ever. Public schools aren't great, but it's the lesser of two evils. Homeschooling left me completely unprepared for the world. If I can save someone from the potential horrors of homeschooling, my difficulty getting started in the world might have been worth it for me. I didn't (and still don't) know how to communicate with peers, and got stuck in some horrible relationships my first few years of college. THAT is what homeschooling does. It is not good AT ALL. I hated life when I was homeschooled. I hated every day of it. I contemplated suicide for years.
Don't homeschool your kids unless you want them to be suicidal and depressed their entire childhood.

The vast majority of parents in the US do in fact speak English natively, and are, more or less, literate. So your experiences might not be typical. That said, there are plenty of parents in the US who I would not particularly want to have teaching my kids. But then there are plenty of teachers in the US that I would not particularly want to have teaching my kids. The people who frequent these boards seem to be at least as thoughtful and literate the gradeschool teachers that I had the, ah, "joy" of dealing with. So in the context of this board, I think that homeschooling is likely to work out at least as well as more traditional schooling. Obviously though, any sort of schooling requires an instructor able and willing to teach the basics and to encourage the research required to move beyond them.

User avatar
Kendo_Bunny
Posts: 528
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:56 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:31 pm UTC

crystalclear wrote:Don't homeschool your kids unless you want them to be suicidal and depressed their entire childhood.


Interesting. I was suicidal and depressed in public school. In fact, I became bulimic and basically destroyed my body. Transferring to home school very likely saved my life - I was on the edge of a nervous breakdown and purging up to twice a day, plus sleeping 16 to 20 hours straight. Add to that a deathly fear of males (because most of the bullying I went through was sexual) and complete distrust of school authority (for doing nothing about it)

Maybe you can blame the homeschool that you do not know how to make reasonable claims without resorting to intensely personal generalizations, but obviously, not everyone who has gone through homeschool has the same experience.

User avatar
Narius
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2009 1:39 am UTC
Location: Dorin System

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Narius » Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:02 am UTC

Replying to the OP-I haven't taken the time to read all the various threads of conversations that may have formed.

I was homeschooled from preschool until 8th grade, and I personally highly recommend it. Not to say public schooling is bad, but I think homeschooling was the best thing for me. If you are going to homeschool, try to connect with a group of homeschooling families; that's what I had, so I didn't have any problems in my social development. As far as academics, it does require a bit of self-starting on the part of the student, and a lot of dedication on the part of the parent who is going to be the teacher. However, after being homeschooled I went to a private junior high and finished 4th in the class, and finished 5th in my high school class, so homeschooling is not by any means a lesser form of education. Academics aside, I think it's a really great way for a family to get a lot closer, which I imagine is important for you and perhaps one of the main reasons you want to do it (but I'm just assuming).

But while I do think it's great for elementary school, I have to say I would recommend public school for high school. This may just be because this is how I did it, but I think it works. Once in high school, opportunities become available for public students that homeschoolers just can't get. A homeschooled kid would eventually need experience in a classroom prior to college, or that would be a culture shock. While homeschooling doesn't shield kids from the world like most think it would, there is something about actually going to a public school that is needed as experience. Also, once they get in to more difficult classes (depending on what your kid's academic bent turns out to be), it may be beyond you as parents to teach them adequately.

So yea, homeschooling is great. But I would strongly advise getting them into a public school for high school.

[EDIT] So I just noticed the OP was from two years ago....oh well.

User avatar
modularblues
Posts: 689
Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 8:33 am UTC
Location: Escher's Wonderland
Contact:

Re: Homeschooling

Postby modularblues » Sun Nov 08, 2009 10:10 am UTC

I know two home-schoolers... roomed with one on a math field trip when I was in middle school and was in the same class with another in college. They are very idiosyncratic. Incredibly brilliant in math, socially functional but ever somewhat awkward. I think home-schooling might be a good idea in kindergarten/pre-kindergarten stage or maybe elementary school, but after that kids should learn how to interact with other kids, etc.

User avatar
Cissy
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 5:56 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Cissy » Wed Nov 11, 2009 6:07 pm UTC

Thought I'd share my perspective, having been homeschooled.

I was homeschooled through 10th grade, going to community college for 11th and 12th. I think that homeschooling gave me a bit of an advantage over the others in my classes, since I'm used to getting a book and learning from it and they're used to learning from the teacher. This works well when you have a good teacher, but when your teacher is terrible? Not so much. My homeschooling heavily emphasized reading- anything and everything, novels and non-fiction. I didn't ever write an essay until I got to community college, but (if it's not conceited to say it!) my writing is better than that of many in my english class. I really believe that this is because I read so much, and naturally emulate what I read.
Another advantage that I have is that I'm actually interested in learning, not just putting in as little effort as is required to get a decent grade. I didn't get grades at all during my time as a homeschooler, which is a police I strongly advocate. I'm astonished at how little people around me care about what they're learning!

As for socialization, I'm a quieter person. That's just my personality; it has nothing whatsoever to do with my educational background. Unfortunately, most people cannot understand this. Many of my homeschooled friends are quite social people; they make friends wherever they go and love to be the center of attention. I'm simply not like this. I prefer to keep to myself. From what I hear, there are quiet people in public schools too, so I wonder how that is explained?
The other thing I must criticize is the idea that kids learn to socialize in public school. I've had the experience many times of being in activities with people who are in public school. Those who go to the same school stick to their little groups and refuse to socialize with anyone they don't know- not my idea of being good at socializing! Even in my community college classes, those who went to the same high school won't talk to people who didn't. I believe public school can actually be a handicap to socializing, since they don't often meet new people. In contrast, as a homeschooler I had to be around people that I'd never met, that didn't know the same people that I did, and were often not even my own age.

Now here's a big exception to my stance that homeschooling is an excellent educational choice: I do not in any way support "boxed-sets" or super-religious educations. I think that getting a ready-made curriculum completely ruins the flexibility that is one of homeschooling's greatest advantages. As for religion, I'm aware that the reason that many people homeschool is so that they can give their children a religious-based education. Unfortunately, these kids are often sheltered to the point of ridiculosity* and rebel in college, not knowing what to do with the sudden freedom. Their education up to college is generally very biased and I've seen a lot of them become disinterested in their own schooling.

*it's a word now.

User avatar
TheWeirdDarkGirl23
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 2:25 am UTC
Location: Wicker Town

Re: Homeschooling

Postby TheWeirdDarkGirl23 » Sun Jan 03, 2010 2:15 am UTC

i wish i could be homeschooled, but my mom is too small minded, and she thinks public school kids are more social. :x
"HELL IS LIKE SOMEONE PULLING YOUR SINS FROM THE DARK CORNERS OF YOUR SOUL AND SERVING IT TO YOU (ON A PLATTER) IN AN ENDLESS LOOP OF TORTURE.- "

User avatar
Cheezwhiz Jenkins
Posts: 365
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 11:52 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Cheezwhiz Jenkins » Mon Jan 04, 2010 7:00 pm UTC

(Note: I'm not aiming at any specific poster, thusly no attributed quotes - merely paraphrased sentiments) I've no wish to insult or start a debate, just my $ 0.02...

I must respectfully disagree with all the posters saying how terrible homeschooling is for a person's social skills. I speak from experience when I say it is not true that all (or even a majority of) homeschoolers are "antisocial", "socially lacking", or just plain "weirdos". Obviously there are *plenty* of opportunities to interact with other people in a vast variety of situations other than school, and if school is the only place where a child gets any social interaction to the point that if taken out of a public school they develop social handicaps, I'd say something is wrong. Not to mention the fact that it's a bit judgmental anyway to proclaim as "socially retarded" or similar a person who simply isn't as outgoing or social as what one might be used to, or whom you cannot easily relate to. Some people, whether by natural inclination or (granting the assumption for the sake of argument) homeschooling, are just reserved, have "weird" interests and/or plain don't have as strong a need for interaction with other people as some others - there's nothing wrong with that. To quote a terribly cheesy children's book the title of which I can't quite recall, "it's okay to be different". Of course, some homeschoolers are, by most objective standards, simply...odd - but then, you'll find scads of odd people in public schools.


Tl;dr: LEAVE BRITNEY HOMESCHOOLERS ALOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOONE :lol:
That explosion was so big it blew off his mullet :-O

User avatar
Kendo_Bunny
Posts: 528
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 10:56 pm UTC

Re: Homeschooling

Postby Kendo_Bunny » Tue Jan 05, 2010 4:13 pm UTC

Perhaps why most homeschoolers seem odd to people who are used to public school is because they are used to dealing with a much wider variety of people. They seldom have the standard teen social interests, like who's dating whom and what anyone is wearing and what was on TV last night. My observation is homeschoolers are usually more mature than public schoolers, again, probably because responsible homeschooling parents expose their children to people of many different ages in many different settings, rather than just locking them away with a large number of people completely from their age group. Most adults who don't have this bugaboo about home schooling admit that home schooled children are more polite and more mature, and don't seem to having anything off about them socially at all.


Return to “School”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests