1538: "Lyrics"

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x7eggert
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby x7eggert » Tue Jun 16, 2015 12:59 pm UTC

ucim wrote:Actually, "The Day The Music Died" is a short history of rock and roll, compressed into a metaphor as a memorial to ... was it Buddy Holly? He died in a plane crash, I think, cutting off a promising career.

Jose


Also I get _some_ of the references. "Chevy" is a car.-)

When I read about that song, it's more than just a short history, it's criticizing the music business, too.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby dp2 » Tue Jun 16, 2015 1:25 pm UTC

FOARP wrote:
orthogon wrote:
dp2 wrote:
orthogon wrote:
FOARP wrote:PS - just looked up the lyrics to "The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonight" by REM, a song I must have heard hundreds of times: "Call me when you try to wake her up"? WTF?

As I understand it, that's just one candidate for what he sings. I believe REM are one of those bands who refuse to disclose the lyrics to their songs, though this might have changed in the decades since Sidewinder was written.

QFT. The most common interpretation of one line of "It's the End of the World As We Know It" is "Every motive escalate, automotive incinerate", but I am adamant that there aren't enough syllables for that.

The Sidewinder case is particularly annoying, because (a) it's the chorus that's enigmatic, (b) it's ridiculously repetitive, comprising five repetitions of the mysterious line with one additional line that's different each time, and (c) their songs are really catchy and you just have to sing along anyway!


Indeed. For years what i heard was "Only Jamaica", until I realised that this made no sense at it was more likely "only to wake up", but, the version you find online: how did anyone hear that and where did they fit all the syllables?

"Call me when you try to wake her up"? I'm pretty sure that's correct. "Try to wake her up" is definite, you can read his lips in the video. The first half might be shorter. "Come in and try to wake her up" or something. But he is slamming a lot of syllables together.

I like "Only Jamaica", though, great mondegreen.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby armandoalvarez » Tue Jun 16, 2015 1:45 pm UTC

SparkOut wrote:
RogueCynic wrote:Sometimes the extra prepositions are added to preserve the meter. Case in point: Paul McCartney, "Live and Let Die": "In this ever changing world in which we live in".

<edit> I meant Paul reduntantly repeats himself in the line.

Er... No.
Try " in which we're living "

Yes, that would make sense and Paul should have done that. However, the lyrics are, "If this ever changing world in which we live in, makes you give it a cry./ Say live and let die!" http://www.paulmccartney.com/albums/son ... nd-let-die (Warning: Paul's website autoplays some song of his.)

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Various Varieties » Tue Jun 16, 2015 2:06 pm UTC

Wooloomooloo wrote:Ah, but mondegreens are such fun! How else could we get such entertaining gems like Nightwish's "hard porn will find a way"...? :lol:

My favourite mondegreen is a pretty famous one, but the image it conjures up never ceases to amuse me:

And I'm here!
To remind you!
Of the mess you left when you went away!
It's not fair!
To deny me!
Of the cross-eyed bear...



It can be dangerous to write lyrics separately from the music, and place more emphasis on the lyrics themselves than on the melodic union of lyrics and music, because it can mean that the singer is then forced into using a really weird and unnatural scansion (I think that's the right term to describe vocal phrasing patterns...?) in order to cram them all in. Few musicians illustrate this better than the Manic Street Preachers, particularly in the early '90s. (And the Welsh are normally such clear singers, too!) A quick experiment: any chance someone on these boards who's a native English speaker, but not too familiar with that band's music, could give this song a listen, then look up the lyrics afterwards and let us know how much you managed to correctly make out? I'm curious to know! (Could have picked pretty much any track from that album as an example, but that's probably the fastest and densest one.)
Last edited by Various Varieties on Tue Jun 16, 2015 2:54 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby orthogon » Tue Jun 16, 2015 2:13 pm UTC

Various Varieties wrote:A quick experiment: any chance someone on these boards who's a native English speaker, but not too familiar with that band's music, could give this song a listen, then look up the lyrics afterwards and let us know how much you managed to correctly make out? I'm curious to know! (Could have picked pretty much any track from that album as an example, but that's probably the fastest and densest one.)

I'm about halfway through and I think I made out "butterfingers" and "a leper's" so far.

ETA: Update: in the second half, possibly "Can't seem to tell the difference". I also heard a few "PCP"s, but that's cheating because I could see that was the name of the song.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Jun 16, 2015 2:47 pm UTC

Mambrino wrote:
higgs-boson wrote:Metal* - do they really use actual words? And if they do, would it matter?

*This is one of the very rare occations I can compare Metal to Opera and call it a tie.


Yes.


Also, if you can, give the #6 John Darnielle's bit a listen here - http://www.npr.org/programs/ask-me-anot ... do-us-part

Point being, guy is asked to identify death metal songs or bands by their lyrics... Which are being sung melodically over an acoustic guitar.

if you want to jump to the good bit, I think that starts around the 4:40 mark.
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Neil_Boekend » Tue Jun 16, 2015 3:04 pm UTC

Mambrino wrote:
higgs-boson wrote:Metal* - do they really use actual words? And if they do, would it matter?

*This is one of the very rare occations I can compare Metal to Opera and call it a tie.


Yes.

Yes, most metal uses real words in their lyrics.
Arch Enemy or Cradle of Filth for example.

Of course there is much fun to be had in mishearing lyrics.
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Mikeski » Tue Jun 16, 2015 4:39 pm UTC

Djehutynakht wrote:
RGB-es wrote:BTW, I think Sigur Rós solved the problem with lyrics quite well... (first post, I think I cannot use links yet)

Ah yes, Sigur Ros... when they can't find the right words to go into a song they just make up syllables that happen to fit the song.

Funny thing is, me not having an ear for Icelandic... I generally have no clue when he's singing in actual Icelandic or when he's just making it up.

Yup, Vonlenska/Hopelandic gets me, too. Yuki Kajiura does that as well... Kajiuran shares Japanese phonemes.

Then there are the bands who sing entirely in their own made-up languages, like Magma (whose Kobaian sounds more like German, despite the band being French.)

And the ones who sing in English, but just throw out word-salad gibberish because the words "sound right" in the song, like Yes. "Sharp, distance, How can the wind with so many around me..."

Do lyrics like that wind up misheard in ways that make intelligible sentences? :wink:

SecondTalon wrote:Point being, guy is asked to identify death metal songs or bands by their lyrics... Which are being sung melodically over an acoustic guitar.

They could do both for Opeth... do their acoustic/melodic stuff as death metal, and their deathy stuff melodically...

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby SecondTalon » Tue Jun 16, 2015 5:58 pm UTC

Yer missin' the point there.
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Baccar Wozat » Tue Jun 16, 2015 8:43 pm UTC

The reason the lyric problem is such a problem, is this:

I need to know who did this one song. It's from the early/mid 1970s, sounds like Phil Collins singing, but I haven't found the song in the Genesis discography.

The lyrics go: "Something, something, something, da duh, da da DA DAAHHHH..."

And most message boards, thought they might have CODE or QUOTE, do not have a [SHEET MUSIC] tag.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Muswell » Tue Jun 16, 2015 10:26 pm UTC

Anyone who has mastered the art of understanding the lyrics of properly recorded songs and wants a bit of a challenge should try working out what the Barmy Army are singing on any given occasion in the background of England Test Matches (the cricket matches that last five days, for the non-cricket people out there).

Though some, such as the Mitchell Johnson song (anyone who followed the 10/11 Ashes series knows the one I mean) are pretty obvious, some of them come over as total gibberish that can only be tied to specific players because you know who's bowling and batting at the time. The situation is probably not helped by the fact that the songs tend to be sung by drunk lunatics and only picked up by the crowd microphones while the commentators talk over the top.

And it still sounds like the crowd is booing whenever Joe Root walks out to bat.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby dms33 » Wed Jun 17, 2015 4:33 am UTC

moz1959 wrote:I can't help wonder the following:

1. Has Randall been listening to Madder Lake's Twelve Pound Toothbrush?
"Na na na na na na na, na na na na na na Na na"
The rest is open for interpretation, and I've never been able to find out what the lyrics actually were supposed to be.
(It pretty much pre-dates the internet! :shock: )

2. Didn't Samuel L. Jackson and Geena Davis already cover the meat of this gag in "The Long Kiss Goodnight"?
"I'm not talkin bout the linen"


Ask and ye shall receive:
http://www.lyrics.com/12-lb-toothbrush- ... -lake.html

And yes, I own "stillpoint" on vinyl and one day I again possess a working turntable to hear it again!

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Jragonlord » Wed Jun 17, 2015 6:54 am UTC

orthogon wrote:You're right that I'd missed the importance of most of, but it's still has. The subject is most of the music I listen to, of which the quantifier most is the head, however, it says here that
Most is included in a group of quantifiers in which the verb agrees with the noun in the prep. phrase or "closest noun". (singular or plural)

But the rule depends on the quantifier, so it would be each of the songs I listen to has ... but both of the songs I listen to have ... and most of the songs I listen to have ...

... Isn't this sort of confusion why we just love the English language? :roll:

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby orthogon » Wed Jun 17, 2015 8:09 am UTC

Baccar Wozat wrote:The reason the lyric problem is such a problem, is this:

I need to know who did this one song. It's from the early/mid 1970s, sounds like Phil Collins singing, but I haven't found the song in the Genesis discography.

The lyrics go: "Something, something, something, da duh, da da DA DAAHHHH..."

And most message boards, thought they might have CODE or QUOTE, do not have a [SHEET MUSIC] tag.

If you would be able to write the tune down in musical notation, or play it on a keyboard, you can try the melody search on musipedia. Even if you can't do that, you could try whistling it. And if you can't play or write music or hold a tune, but can tell if one note is higher or lower (or the same as) the previous note, you can try the melodic contour search. Actually the melodic contour is often the quickest way even if you can use the other methods. Of course, it's limited by what songs are in the database.

Jragonlord wrote:
orthogon wrote:You're right that I'd missed the importance of most of, but it's still has. The subject is most of the music I listen to, of which the quantifier most is the head, however, it says here that
Most is included in a group of quantifiers in which the verb agrees with the noun in the prep. phrase or "closest noun". (singular or plural)

But the rule depends on the quantifier, so it would be each of the songs I listen to has ... but both of the songs I listen to have ... and most of the songs I listen to have ...

... Isn't this sort of confusion why we just love the English language? :roll:

I contend that there is a logic to it, though. Each of invites the listener to consider every one of the tunes individually and makes a statement about it; both of specifically refers to two items and takes them jointly. Most of is a dual-purpose quantifier that can mean "the majority of a collection of countable things, taken jointly" or "the greater part of an uncountable thing". If you like, it's two different quantifiers with the same form, or two senses of the same word. It's because of this polysemy that you have to establish which sense is being used in order to work out the verb agreement. It's similar to the way more works: we can have more peas and more gravy, but it's fewer peas and less gravy.

Edit: added link
Last edited by orthogon on Wed Jun 17, 2015 12:58 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby sfmans » Wed Jun 17, 2015 8:15 am UTC

Muswell wrote:And it still sounds like the crowd is booing whenever Joe Root walks out to bat.


Daryl 'Moose' Johnston of the 90s Dallas Cowboys use to get the same treatment - after a decent play the whole crowd would go 'Moooooose', which sounded remarkably like booing on the TV ...

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby x7eggert » Wed Jun 17, 2015 3:09 pm UTC

Jragonlord wrote:
orthogon wrote:But the rule depends on the quantifier, so it would be each of the songs I listen to has ... but both of the songs I listen to have ... and most of the songs I listen to have ...

... Isn't this sort of confusion why we just love the English language? :roll:


"Each song" is singular because you take one out of a set. Also "the specific song" is singular. (Take one, then say something about it.)

It's just like in programming, "foreach" and getElementByID gives you a single object, getElementsByTagName gives you an array.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby david.windsor » Wed Jun 17, 2015 9:00 pm UTC

Keyman wrote:
JudeMorrigan wrote:
sfmans wrote:This is such a Grumpy Old Man cartoon. Modern pop music, can't hear the words, weren't like that in my day ...

I don't think there was any implication in the comic of older songs being clearer.

If it's a Grumpy Old Man thing, I'd plead guilty, but it ain't necessarily just "modern pop music". It's been going on for a while.

Seems to me, if an artist believes the lyrics are meant to convey a specific sound, then there is no real need for the words to be intelligible (or comprehensible, if they are (I was told once, this was a "Jon Anderson" thing - the lyrics don't have to make sense because he sometimes chooses phonemes for the harmonic structure)). But if the lyrics are to be appreciated as a message, a poem, a rant, a political statement...then they owe it to us, the audience, to make it clearly heard. It's a much better experience to be saying 'WTF did he mean?, rather than "WTF did he say?'


Listen to the 'Zoolook' album by Jarre, he basicly fed recordings of phonics into a synclaver and composed a record with it.
"All those ... moments, will be lost ... in time, like tears ... in rain."

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Jplus » Sat Jun 27, 2015 1:10 pm UTC

I'm so glad to learn I'm not the only one who can't listen to lyrics in a piece of music.
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Bloopy » Tue Jun 30, 2015 6:57 am UTC

For a moment I thought N.W.A were early adopters of the Internet, thinking I'd heard "what you hear online". But turns out it was "once you hear one line".

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Kaliena2 » Wed Jul 01, 2015 8:42 am UTC

I didn't see anyone mentioning processing deficiencies in this thread. If you have CAPD you may have trouble distinguishing words over background noise. This may lead you to have trouble hearing your partner over the tv, hearing your conversational partner at a party where many people are speaking at the same time, things like that. It certainly could make hearing lyrics in, for lack of a better term, muddy music very challenging.

I often have to repeat the gobbidy-gook that comes into my brain just to prove to people that I wasn't ignoring them. Right sure, swing the cram-a-dee purple. Uh-huh. Wanna try that again?

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Keybounce » Fri Jul 17, 2015 2:21 am UTC

Entirely missing from this discussion so far are songs like "I want to kiss her".

You can clearly hear the worlds, no problem.

But figuring out which word it is, given that there are many cases of words that sound alike, but more than one can fit the song, is ... (intentional :-)
<this space on hold>

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Wed Jul 22, 2015 4:59 pm UTC

You know I'm on a BMX, BMX, note ruble
Last edited by Sableagle on Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:29 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby addams » Thu Jul 23, 2015 5:37 am UTC

cryptoengineer wrote:On the other hand, if you've ever wondered what English pop
songs sound like to a non-English speaker, try this: its one
of the most extraordinary pieces of music I've ever heard.

"Prisencolinensinainciusol"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfSJEWNTvo4

ce

Sense you left this link on this thread, five weeks ago,
I have listened to and watched it several times.

"Prisencolinensinainciusol"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfSJEWNTvo4

I agree with you.
This is one of the most extraordinary pieces of music I've ever been exposed to.

The choreography is delightfully bold.
The whole thing is entertaining and conveys an air of Importance and Meaning.

It's so funny.
It doesn't mean a darned thing.
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Eshru » Thu Jul 23, 2015 7:18 am UTC

sfmans wrote:
Muswell wrote:And it still sounds like the crowd is booing whenever Joe Root walks out to bat.


Daryl 'Moose' Johnston of the 90s Dallas Cowboys use to get the same treatment - after a decent play the whole crowd would go 'Moooooose', which sounded remarkably like booing on the TV ...

Toews (Chicago Blackhawks) also has this effect. I wonder how many instances of this 'phenomenon' exist.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Thu Jul 23, 2015 5:34 pm UTC

addams wrote:
cryptoengineer wrote:On the other hand, if you've ever wondered what English pop
songs sound like to a non-English speaker, try this: its one
of the most extraordinary pieces of music I've ever heard.

"Prisencolinensinainciusol"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfSJEWNTvo4

ce

Sense you left this link on this thread, five weeks ago,
I have listened to and watched it several times.

"Prisencolinensinainciusol"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfSJEWNTvo4

I agree with you.
This is one of the most extraordinary pieces of music I've ever been exposed to.

The choreography is delightfully bold.
The whole thing is entertaining and conveys an air of Importance and Meaning.

It's so funny.
It doesn't mean a darned thing.


Erm ...
Please encode inane sin nine chew sew.
You the code maize a save one.
Please encode inane sin nine chew sew.
Ore right.
When you shine the shoes now I'm hold bin the same
then I hole a rim never get to call the boss Dime.
Brrrrrrup, chicken some lime we get a Cold War, baby.
Just stay at Pluto, woe.
When you shine the shoes now I'm hold bin the same
then I hole a rim never get to call the boss Dime.
When it's the same I ask you to copy Steam.
... ?

You're right. That doesn't mean much to me.
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Thu Jul 23, 2015 5:37 pm UTC

dp2 wrote:"Come in and try to wake her up" or something. But he is slamming a lot of syllables together.
Oh, THAT line? I thought that was "commenting on weigelas."
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Thu Jul 23, 2015 5:41 pm UTC

RogueCynic wrote:Paul McCartney, "Live and Let Die": "In this ever changing world in which we live in".
When you were young and your heart was an open book,
you used to say: 'Live and let live,'
(You know you did. You know you did. You know you di-id.)
but if this ever-changing world in which we're living
makes you give in and cry (da-da-dam)
say: 'Live and let die!'
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:27 pm UTC

higgs-boson wrote:Metal* - do they really use actual words?


Yes, they do, unless you've got a very specific definition of "metal" that includes "no actual words used." If you believe Harmonix, "The Final Countdown" and "Pirates till we Die" are metal, and they definitely have words.

So do these:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSlSaGcc0QM
"I don't know where I'm goin', but I sure know where I've been, hangin' on the promises of the songs of yesterday. I've made up my mind I ain't wastin' no more time, but here I go again. Here I go again. Though I keep searching for an answer I never seem to find what I'm looking for."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPbqQOf41Qc
"As the reasons for the carnage cut their meat and lick the gravy, we oil up the jaws of the war machine and feed it with our babies. ... The body-bags and little rags of children torn in two and the jellied brain of those who remained will put the finger right on you!"
https://youtu.be/s4APFHFX4hs?t=2473
"So, God, let us go now and finish what's to be done. 'Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done ... on Earth ...' Try to justify to ourselves the reasons to go. Should we live and let live? Forget or forgive? But how can we let them go on this way? The reign of terror, corruption must end, and we know, deep down, there's no other way, no trust, no reasoning, no more to say."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBQFEZm_pkE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YbddUU70eK8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSWjnyl-LaY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjsHgDUoyCY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P95muhoy4Ts
(Lyrics in videos)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzTZeeMCUBk
"There's no use in crying.
All my tears won't drown my pain.
Free me from your sorrow.
I can't grieve you again.
I watched you let yourself diiiieeee,
And now it's too late to save you this tiiiiiime.
You bury me aliiiiive,
and everybody's got to breathe somehow.
Don't leave me to die,
too consumed by your own emptiness and lies.
All I did was love you.
Now I hate the nightmare you've become.
I can't let me fool me.
I won't need you again.
I watched you let yourself diiiieeee,
And now it's too late to save you this tiiiiiime.
You bury me aliiiiive,
and everybody's got to breathe somehow."
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby mathmannix » Fri Jul 24, 2015 5:18 pm UTC

Sableagle wrote:
RogueCynic wrote:Paul McCartney, "Live and Let Die": "In this ever changing world in which we live in".
When you were young and your heart was an open book,
you used to say: 'Live and let live,'
(You know you did. You know you did. You know you di-id.)
but if this ever-changing world in which we're living
makes you give in and cry (da-da-dam)
say: 'Live and let die!'

Well MAYBE if Sir Paul had learned to pronounce his R's more clearly, we would be able to understand him better. [/arrogant American]
I hear velociraptor tastes like chicken.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Sat Jul 25, 2015 12:32 am UTC

That or he'd have sounded Scottish. "Forr yourr eyres only, carn see me thrrrough ther nirght. Forr yourr eyres only, Ar nerverr neared to hide. Yerr carn seer so murch in me, so murch in me thart's new."
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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addams
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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby addams » Sun Aug 02, 2015 10:47 pm UTC

Various Varieties wrote:
Wooloomooloo wrote:Ah, but mondegreens are such fun! How else could we get such entertaining gems like Nightwish's "hard porn will find a way"...? :lol:

My favourite mondegreen is a pretty famous one, but the image it conjures up never ceases to amuse me:

And I'm here!
To remind you!
Of the mess you left when you went away!
It's not fair!
To deny me!
Of the cross-eyed bear...



It can be dangerous to write lyrics separately from the music, and place more emphasis on the lyrics themselves than on the melodic union of lyrics and music, because it can mean that the singer is then forced into using a really weird and unnatural scansion (I think that's the right term to describe vocal phrasing patterns...?) in order to cram them all in. Few musicians illustrate this better than the Manic Street Preachers, particularly in the early '90s. (And the Welsh are normally such clear singers, too!) A quick experiment: any chance someone on these boards who's a native English speaker, but not too familiar with that band's music, could give this song a listen, then look up the lyrics afterwards and let us know how much you managed to correctly make out? I'm curious to know! (Could have picked pretty much any track from that album as an example, but that's probably the fastest and densest one.)

I am a native English Speaker.

My poor Mother.
I asked her to listen to Jimi Hendrix with me.

That music is as Alien to me as Hendrix was to my mother.

I did not understand a word of the music behind your link.
I did not enjoy the music.

I do not understand one word of the music behind the link cryptoengineer submitted.
I did enjoy the music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfSJEWNTvo4
Whimsical?
Life is, just, an exchange of electrons; It is up to us to give it meaning.

We are all in The Gutter.
Some of us see The Gutter.
Some of us see The Stars.
by mr. Oscar Wilde.

Those that want to Know; Know.
Those that do not Know; Don't tell them.
They do terrible things to people that Tell Them.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Sableagle » Mon Aug 03, 2015 4:22 pm UTC

Various Varieties wrote:A quick experiment: any chance someone on these boards who's a native English speaker, but not too familiar with that band's music, could give this song a listen, then look up the lyrics afterwards and let us know how much you managed to correctly make out?
Teacher stalk a chap you see I'm fruit but sack a talk fat sap our ewe. Sister mav a tuss a me I'm not a song about all I was a jump vee. Gem funk sonnet ash ...

...

You know what? I'm not going to look the lyrics up. I'm going to guess how much of that I correctly made out: NONE!
Oh, Willie McBride, it was all done in vain.

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Re: 1538: "Lyrics"

Postby Keybounce » Mon Aug 03, 2015 5:11 pm UTC

Personally, I like trying to figure out the lyrics from the "twirling leak" song (aka the Levan Polka, or at least a 30 second clip of it.)

Bonus points for trying to get english out of a polish song :-)
<this space on hold>


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