1572: "xkcd Survey"

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Eshru
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Eshru » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:13 am UTC

Shouldn't vacuum be spelt vacwm? Isn't that the point of that letter?

49

8

Dog cat llama giraffe horse

Obfuscation was the first 'random' word. Damp was another.

Phone auticorrect made the mashing fail.

Edit: Disappointed that hot dog wasn't on the sandwich list to frustrate John Hodgman.

Edit2: Fleek isn't a fake word having been added recently iirc.
Last edited by Eshru on Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:29 am UTC, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Eternal Density » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:15 am UTC

CharlieBing wrote:On the "Which of these words do you know the meaning of?" (Check all that apply), I got 9 words:

Soliloquy
Regolith
Modicum
Hubris
Rife
Stipple
Amiable
Salient
Lithe

I figured all the other were fake words, but I missed Phoropter (some sort of eye testing device) and Peristeronic (which means relating to pigeons) and which is such a fine word that should be one if it wasn't already. But according to Oxford at least (and I am not at home with my Shorter Oxford with the magnifying glass), all the others are fake. It will be interesting what XKCD does with the responses to this question.
Same here!
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:21 am UTC

Taco - any food wrapped in a (Mexican-definition) tortilla
Quesadilla - Taco with a coating of cheese between the tortilla and the other food

No, there are many other kinds of food wrapped in a tortilla that don't count as tacos, such as burritos (where the wrapping is much more thorough, completely enclosing the food, and always done with a soft flour tortilla, occasionally "wet" meaning smothered in sauce and cheese on the outside like an enchilada, usually with the ingredients inside heated separately and the tortilla just steamed, but sometimes with the tortilla grilled), enchiladas (which are basically wet burritos with the ends left open and with soft corn tortillas instead), chimichangas (basically fried burritos), quesadillas (flat unlike a burrito/enchilada/chimichanga or taco, always with a soft flour tortilla, always with cheese, pressed together and grilled on both sides, may be made from one tortilla folded over itself or two tortillas, one on either side), and tostadas (a toasted tortilla, either flat or curved into a bowl shape, with food piled on top). Tacos can be made with soft (usually corn) tortillas, which are not pressed together and grilled like a quesadilla; or in hard-shell (always corn) tortillas, which are folded over themselves with an opening in the middle and then deep-fried or toasted until hard and crispy. If a taco has cheese in it, it is usually loose shredded cheese, not hot melted cheese. Other than the requirement that a quesadilla have hot melted cheese in it, any of them besides tacos and tostadas won't usually have any cold ingredients in them like lettuce or pico, basically any common ingredients from this style of cuisine (black or pinto beans, a variety of cheeses, meats, and sauces, sour cream, pico de gallo, lettuce, etc) can go into any of these dishes.

And I would not normally call any of these a sandwich, though I might begrudgingly admit that most of them should count as sandwiches (or be grouped into the same category alongside sandwiches) together with pizza and calzones... but only in the same way that cereal should maybe count as a soup. As in, it sounds like it meets some technical definition, but nobody would understand you if you talked like that.
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Adacore » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:27 am UTC

I think I said I knew the meaning of all the real words and two fake words (unitory, because I misread it as unitary, and revergent, because I felt the definition seemed obvious, if it was a word). I was assuming that all the words were real, but obscure, so I was a bit hesitant to say I "knew" the definition of a word I'd never seen before but could deduce, but in the end decided that deduction counted as "knowledge".

I counted subs (including cheesesteak) and burgers as sandwiches, but nothing else. For me a sandwich requires some filling between two pieces of (previously baked) bread. Open sandwich is troubling, because it is obviously a sandwich by its own description, yet doesn't meet my definition of the word. But then it always seemed like a silly term to me, so that's okay.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby arcanmster » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:52 am UTC

  • Five animals: chocobo, dragon, basilisk, pikachu and python
  • Mispelt word: Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch
  • Number from 1 to 100: of course, 42. Tradition. Fortunately, there was a duplicate of this question.
  • How many twin/etc siblings: I tried to put "i" but it didn't like it :(
  • Another number from 1 to 100: 99.99 anyone?
  • Where is the internet: Obviously, here
  • How old are you: I think I put -1 by "mistake". I wanted to put 10 as it's always correct (when choosing an adequate basis)
  • Color of the walls: fucksia anyone?
  • Please type "cat" here:: "cat" here:
  • Type five random words: wait, were we supposed to type 5 words with the keyboard? I thought he was asking for the type of five, random, and words. As in five is an strinteger, random is a class and words is itself a collection of strings.
  • On a scale of 1 to 5, which number is your favorite: was intending to tamper with the data to submit "9001" but I forgot when I clicked on the button. Dammit.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:59 am UTC

arcanmster wrote:On a scale of 1 to 5, which number is your favorite: was intending to tamper with the data to submit "9001" but I forgot when I clicked on the button. Dammit.[/list]

Is that number a reference to anything? I know it's the ISO standard for quality management systems, but that seems a bit obscure.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:09 am UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:No, there are many other kinds of food wrapped in a tortilla that don't count as tacos, such as burritos (where the wrapping is much more thorough, completely enclosing the food, and always done with a soft flour tortilla, occasionally "wet" meaning smothered in sauce and cheese on the outside like an enchilada, usually with the ingredients inside heated separately and the tortilla just steamed, but sometimes with the tortilla grilled), enchiladas (which are basically wet burritos with the ends left open and with soft corn tortillas instead), chimichangas (basically fried burritos), quesadillas (flat unlike a burrito/enchilada/chimichanga or taco, always with a soft flour tortilla, always with cheese, pressed together and grilled on both sides, may be made from one tortilla folded over itself or two tortillas, one on either side), and tostadas (a toasted tortilla, either flat or curved into a bowl shape, with food piled on top). Tacos can be made with soft (usually corn) tortillas, which are not pressed together and grilled like a quesadilla; or in hard-shell (always corn) tortillas, which are folded over themselves with an opening in the middle and then deep-fried or toasted until hard and crispy. If a taco has cheese in it, it is usually loose shredded cheese, not hot melted cheese. Other than the requirement that a quesadilla have hot melted cheese in it, any of them besides tacos and tostadas won't usually have any cold ingredients in them like lettuce or pico, basically any common ingredients from this style of cuisine (black or pinto beans, a variety of cheeses, meats, and sauces, sour cream, pico de gallo, lettuce, etc) can go into any of these dishes.

There was a good comedy routine about Mexican (i.e. Tex-Mex) food from the '90s when it first caught on in the UK. It was riffing on the idea that all "Mexican" dishes are basically the same, just folded differently, and comic had an imaginary diner complain "Excuse me, but I ordered a burrito" to which the waiter replied "I'm terribly sorry, sir", and proceeded to unfold and refold the tortilla in the desired way. Buggered if I can find it now though. I was thinking Billy Connolly or Eddie Izzard.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Von_Cheam » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:24 am UTC

Copper Bezel wrote:
Von_Cheam wrote:blah blah infosec etc.

You had the single best possible survey answer, but no, I don't think that's a reasonable concern. Partly because people probably don't follow normal typing patterns when keyboard mashing, meaning that there's a completely different set of idiosyncrasies, but mostly because trying not to accidentally discover security issues is the worst approach to security.


More-or-less the answer I was hoping for; ta muchly!

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby LordHorst » Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:12 am UTC

"Which of these words do you know the meaning of?"

One (Hubris). Because english isn't my native language and I felt translating the words would be a bit like cheating. :|

Number from 1 to 100: 13, because it's my favorite number (I was born on a 13th, so not much choice there)
Number from 1 to 100 Part 2: 33, because it's my second favorite number. :D
Animals: Yeah, I went totally mainstream here, with mouse, elephant, duck, cat, dog
Favorite number on a scale from 1 to 5: 3. See above.
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby sid_cypher » Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:31 am UTC

Autolykos wrote:Also, "On a scale from 1 to 5, which number is your favourite?" does not parse for me.

The numbers from 1 to 5 are literally right there on a scale. From those numbers (this handful of numbers on the given scale), which one is your favourite?

The pitfalls of automatically (subconsciously) resolving semantical ambiguity.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby cantab314 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 10:33 am UTC

Plutarch wrote:'Stick-shift,' - that would just be a normal car in the UK.
Meaning I predict a small but measurable correlation between being able to drive a stick-shift and it raining when the person was taking the survey :)

Quercus wrote:Is that number a reference to anything? I know it's the ISO standard for quality management systems, but that seems a bit obscure.
It's OVER NINE THOUSAND.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Scilly_Guy » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:19 am UTC

I spelt my word correct first time which confused me but trying to type it again just now resulted in much fumbling. Also I realised there are a couple of other words I often spell wrong.

How can we get our hands on the results?

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Znirk » Thu Sep 03, 2015 11:22 am UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
Taco - any food wrapped in a (Mexican-definition) tortilla

No, there are many other kinds of food wrapped in a tortilla that don't count as tacos, [Food Explainer]

I'm really more interested in the other direction here: Are there any tacoi that don't fit the "food wrapped in a tortilla" description? (And are some of these dishes, to you, more sandwich-like than others?)

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby kasmeneo » Thu Sep 03, 2015 12:03 pm UTC

cantab314 wrote:
Plutarch wrote:'Stick-shift,' - that would just be a normal car in the UK.
Meaning I predict a small but measurable correlation between being able to drive a stick-shift and it raining when the person was taking the survey :)

Actually anywhere in Europe, I would say. I had to look it up in the dictionary only to realise he's talking about normal cars. The only time I ever drove one with automatic gear shift was when I had a rental car in the US, that's how rare they are here.

Eshru wrote:Shouldn't vacuum be spelt vacwm? Isn't that the point of that letter?

In Welsh, it is still used like that, more or less. You could ride on the bws from Gwbert to Eglwyswrw, at least theoretically, as there propably isn't one actually going that way.

Znirk wrote:I just looked them up. Unlike with the specific "Which words do you know" question, google seemed an appropriate tool. In case anyone is interested, here's my understanding of the sandwich candidates.
Spoiler:
Taco - any food wrapped in a (Mexican-definition) tortilla
Hamburger - mincemeat rissole, often served in a cut-open bun
Sub/Hoagie - cut-open mini-baguette containing other food
Cheesesteak - specific type of Sub containing kebab meat and melted cheese
Quesadilla - Taco with a coating of cheese between the tortilla and the other food
Open-faced sandwich - food on a slice of bread
Calzone - Pizza folded in half before baking, shaped like an oversize mezzaluna. Traditionally with ricotta and meat, but like with open-faced pizza the definition has expanded.


In my understanding, none of those is a sandwich. A sandwich is food (usually a slice of cheese or cold meat, plus some other optional ingredients like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, etc) between two slices of soft bread, the kind you would also use to make toast. If any of those other things were a sandwich, it would not have a specific different name, would it?
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Znirk » Thu Sep 03, 2015 12:14 pm UTC

kasmeneo wrote:A sandwich is food (usually a slice of cheese or cold meat, plus some other optional ingredients like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, etc) between two slices of soft bread, the kind you would also use to make toast. If any of those other things were a sandwich, it would not have a specific different name, would it?


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyponymy_and_hypernymy
tl;dr: Sandwich can be seen as a higher-level, category word which includes several more specific sub-types of sandwich. A bit like "red" can still be a "colour", or a "spider" can be an "animal", even though we have specific different words for "red" and "spider".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prototype_theory
tl;dr: Sandwich being one of the specific kinds of sandwiches doesn't mean it's not also the category word. Like some variants of Spanish use colorado (literally "coloured", "having the property of colour") for "red".

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Thu Sep 03, 2015 12:36 pm UTC

What Znirk said. Also, the usage of sandwich in the context of burgers, though perfectly cromulent, is generally confined to the tortuous corporate language of McDonalds and the like. My feeling is that real person wouldn't use the word in that way any more than they'd call the outlet itself a restaurant. Burger is surely the mot juste, covering all the things it needs to cover without drawing the net too widely.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Marsh'n » Thu Sep 03, 2015 12:52 pm UTC

Sprocket wrote:I wonder if this can double as a dating ap?


I'd be cool with that... I certainly think people attracted to xkcd are going to be above-average (in multiple senses) matches. But now I wish I'd saved my answers! :)

A few random bits I do remember:
My first 2 animals were "pig giraffe" and my last was "frog" - I see some commonality there.
In the key mashing I had no issues with premature submission ( :wink: ) of the form, but after a while I ceased to be convinced that the input block had a limit, typed "(define fill?)" and then continued for a while until I got bored.
I wasn't sure what I most often misspelled (I rated myself 9/10 on spelling) but I know that my fingers often get carried away with a certain word so I entered "rememember"
I only checked the half-dozen rare words that I was certain I knew, preferring to appear ignorant of the words than ignorant of the non-words. (Actually, based on CharlieBing's reply, I think I probably checked 8, not being certain about regolith.)
For sandwiches, I chose things that I would call a sandwich (which includes "open faced sandwich" because I would be using the word in the description, though I certainly understand the semantic objection) rather than things I would consider "cross-culturally analogous to a sandwich". I've been very intrigued by cross-cultural food analogs for a long time, e.g. crepe<->blintz<->dosa or onion-ring<->calamari<->pakora. (Worrying if I used "e.g." right here, wondering whether I should spell out exempli rather than exemplus but not knowing how gratis is properly declined...)

Adds:
Text editor preference: yes (emacs - even for things like typing meeting minutes which eventually have to get sent out in Word or some other format...)
Weather outside: basement (which is both a description of what I can tell about the weather from here, and a whispered apology to my friends over at 1190)
Where the Internet is: "In a large concrete box building in Utah with special suspension system to protect it from earthquakes." (approx)


Cheers!

ETA more remembered answers.
Last edited by Marsh'n on Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:54 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Yamahako » Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:11 pm UTC

kasmeneo wrote:In my understanding, none of those is a sandwich. A sandwich is food (usually a slice of cheese or cold meat, plus some other optional ingredients like lettuce, tomato, cucumber, etc) between two slices of soft bread, the kind you would also use to make toast. If any of those other things were a sandwich, it would not have a specific different name, would it?


The concept of the sandwich is attributed to John Montagu (incidentally the 4th Earl of Sandwich), he died in 1792.
Sliced soft bread (in the form I think you're assuming) wasn't invented until 1928.

So I think you are defining sandwich by very modern terms.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Flumble » Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:44 pm UTC

lordatog wrote:I can never spell definitely without looking it up. I always know it's either "definitely" or "definately", can never remember which, and almost always guess wrong. Even if I take into account that I always get it wrong and thus choose the option that seems wrong at the time, I get it wrong. It's literally the only word I use with any frequency that gives me any trouble at all.

There's only a finite amount of certainty you can have when you say "definitely".


kasmeneo wrote:Actually anywhere in Europe, I would say. I had to look it up in the dictionary only to realise he's talking about normal cars. The only time I ever drove one with automatic gear shift was when I had a rental car in the US, that's how rare they are here.

Automatic transmission isn't that rare. There are even emergency vehicles with it –which makes sense, really, because you can keep both hands on the steering wheel and your mind at the traffic. Modern automatic gearboxes are as good as or better than your average (manual transmission!) driver.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Antarctica » Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:00 pm UTC

Could you please add another answer option to the question

Do you usually remember your dreams?

I need the answer

I cannot distinguish dreams from reality.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Draconaes » Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:28 pm UTC

The_Alchemist wrote:
eran_rathan wrote:did no one else type 'five random words' when it said to type five random words?

Guess it was just me then. :oops:


No...that's good though. But I did type "cat" - quotes included.


When it asked me to type "cat", I entered "ok" (sans quotes). I was feeling cheeky.

edit: to clarify, I typed cat, then backspaced and entered ok to signify that I had complied.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby NumberFourtyThree » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:32 pm UTC

I'm sure "42" showed up a lot, but I wonder how many people typed "pi" on one of the "enter a number between 1 and 100" boxes.
The world is imperfect because it has to be. If everything were perfectly fair and without problems we would all live the exact same pointless life, with no possible meaning to it.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby RGB-es » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:34 pm UTC

It seems I'm quite influenced by the environment: the first animal that came to my mind was Dolphin (I'm a KDE user), the second one was velociraptor (I'm a xkcd reader), the third one was an association: velociraptor → birds → Condor. 15 years ago or so a condor flew over my head when trekking on the Andes mountains and I'm still impressed.

I don't remember the fourth one but the fifth was:

cat, what's wrong with cats?

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby RGB-es » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:39 pm UTC

NumberFourtyThree wrote:I'm sure "42" showed up a lot, but I wonder how many people typed "pi" on one of the "enter a number between 1 and 100" boxes.

Anyway, it's better to use tau.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Mindfield » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:20 pm UTC

I imagined the Internet being in Steve Wozniak's basement.

Also, is Splink! a word? Because I used it as a random word. So I'm saying it's a word.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby doctorray » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:27 pm UTC

Really popular food I don't like: french toast

Last thing I ate: Monte Cristo

oops. :-)

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby RAGBRAIvet » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:29 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:
doglover wrote:
orthogon wrote:
Angua wrote:I had trouble spelling my frequently misspelled word....

It's occasionally.

Still can't spell it in this post :P

Me too. Manoeuvre. Damn, had to resort to spellcheck yet again.

"Unfortunately" was mine. My fingers always go faster than my brain when I type that one...

That's an interesting point: manoeuvre is a word I find hard to spell even given arbitrary time to think about it, but the word I misspell the most frequently despite knowing perfectly well how to spell it could easily be something like teh. And thanks to years of C/C++ programming, words ending -in are tricky: it's almost impossible for me not to add a "t".

Mine was banana.  I never know where to stop.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby NickTalsma » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:30 pm UTC

Anyone else have frequent trouble spelling Robert'); DROP TABLE words;-- ? :wink:

Also, yet another vote for both 42 and pi. I think the survey results will say even more about patterns in the target audience of xkcd as a whole than correlation between different responses.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:30 pm UTC

RAGBRAIvet wrote:Mine was banana.  I never know where to stop.

Stop when you get to "Batman!"
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby RAGBRAIvet » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:33 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:
lordatog wrote:I can never spell definitely without looking it up. I always know it's either "definitely" or "definately", can never remember which, and almost always guess wrong. Even if I take into account that I always get it wrong and thus choose the option that seems wrong at the time, I get it wrong. It's literally the only word I use with any frequency that gives me any trouble at all.

There's only a finite amount of certainty you can have when you say "definitely".


kasmeneo wrote:Actually anywhere in Europe, I would say. I had to look it up in the dictionary only to realise he's talking about normal cars. The only time I ever drove one with automatic gear shift was when I had a rental car in the US, that's how rare they are here.

Automatic transmission isn't that rare. There are even emergency vehicles with it –which makes sense, really, because you can keep both hands on the steering wheel and your mind at the traffic. Modern automatic gearboxes are as good as or better than your average (manual transmission!) driver.

When I was looking for my first car I originally wanted to get one with manual transmission (cheaper, and supposedly better on the gas mileage).  My dad advised me away from this, telling me "suppose you get hurt or drunk or for some reason can't drive and someone else has to use your car to get you home or to go get help.  You may know how to drive a manual but what happens if they don't?"

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Steve the Pocket » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:38 pm UTC

Anyone else tempted to put "suffused elephant quaff winces exasperating" for the random words?

...No? Anyone else even know what I'm talking about?...

Pfhorrest wrote:No, there are many other kinds of food wrapped in a tortilla that don't count as tacos, such as burritos (where the wrapping is much more thorough, completely enclosing the food, and always done with a soft flour tortilla, occasionally "wet" meaning smothered in sauce and cheese on the outside like an enchilada, usually with the ingredients inside heated separately and the tortilla just steamed, but sometimes with the tortilla grilled), enchiladas (which are basically wet burritos with the ends left open and with soft corn tortillas instead), chimichangas (basically fried burritos), quesadillas (flat unlike a burrito/enchilada/chimichanga or taco, always with a soft flour tortilla, always with cheese, pressed together and grilled on both sides, may be made from one tortilla folded over itself or two tortillas, one on either side), and tostadas (a toasted tortilla, either flat or curved into a bowl shape, with food piled on top). Tacos can be made with soft (usually corn) tortillas, which are not pressed together and grilled like a quesadilla; or in hard-shell (always corn) tortillas, which are folded over themselves with an opening in the middle and then deep-fried or toasted until hard and crispy. If a taco has cheese in it, it is usually loose shredded cheese, not hot melted cheese. Other than the requirement that a quesadilla have hot melted cheese in it, any of them besides tacos and tostadas won't usually have any cold ingredients in them like lettuce or pico, basically any common ingredients from this style of cuisine (black or pinto beans, a variety of cheeses, meats, and sauces, sour cream, pico de gallo, lettuce, etc) can go into any of these dishes.

And then you have the recent American concoction, the "wrap", which is basically any combination of ingredients that wouldn't qualify as Mexican or Tex-Mex wrapped up in a flour tortilla.

Flumble wrote:Automatic transmission isn't that rare. There are even emergency vehicles with it –which makes sense, really, because you can keep both hands on the steering wheel and your mind at the traffic. Modern automatic gearboxes are as good as or better than your average (manual transmission!) driver.

And then you have continuously-variable transmission, which is exactly what it sounds like: a system that doesn't use a series of discrete gears at all but one of various systems that can shift continually down the line from high to low without disengaging. All hybrid cars use it, I think, along with an increasing number of conventional ones, because it's more fuel efficient than a conventional automatic.
cephalopod9 wrote:Only on Xkcd can you start a topic involving Hitler and people spend the better part of half a dozen pages arguing about the quality of Operating Systems.

Baige.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Flumble » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:10 pm UTC

Steve the Pocket wrote:
Flumble wrote:Automatic transmission isn't that rare. There are even emergency vehicles with it –which makes sense, really, because you can keep both hands on the steering wheel and your mind at the traffic. Modern automatic gearboxes are as good as or better than your average (manual transmission!) driver.

And then you have continuously-variable transmission, which is exactly what it sounds like: a system that doesn't use a series of discrete gears at all but one of various systems that can shift continually down the line from high to low without disengaging. All hybrid cars use it, I think, along with an increasing number of conventional ones, because it's more fuel efficient than a conventional automatic.

In my mind CVT is just a subset of automatic transmission. :roll:
From what I gather, it's not more fuel efficient at optimal revolution speed –a gearbox easily has less friction for the same price– but who drives at optimal speed anyway? Who even knows the most efficient rev speed of their engine?

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby orthogon » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:21 pm UTC

The relative efficiency of manual and automatic has got to depend on the skill and attentiveness of the manual driver. Car engines are so quiet now that I often realise that I've just driven about ten miles at 60mph in third gear. That can't help the fuel economy.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby SuicideJunkie » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:22 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:Who even knows the most efficient rev speed of their engine?
Presumably the car manufacturer.
And that's pretty much the point as I understand it.
CVT means if you're going 50km/h and the optimal gearing ratio to make your revs perfect is a bit higher than gear 3, the car can be in "gear" pi rather than having to choose between 3 and 4.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:39 pm UTC

I never used to like automatic transmission, because there was no way to tell it that what I really needed was the absolute minimum torque possible going to the wheels to prevent the car skidding on the snowy hill I was trying to get up (living in rural North Wales this is a fairly frequent issue). Apparently the better featured ones these days come with a "winter driving" mode that takes this into account, so I now have no problem with them (as long as they have that feature).

I still don't like the fact that you can't push-start an automatic transmission, but I will grudgingly concede that that's not really a big deal, given that I've only actually done it twice in my life and you can't really push start many modern cars anyway (e.g. if they are fuel injected or have a diesel engine).

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Von_Cheam » Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:37 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:...and you can't really push start many modern cars anyway (e.g. if they are fuel injected or have a diesel engine).

I bet you can totally bump-start a fuel-injected car*! Provided the battery isn't so utterly flat that it can't even power the fuel-injectors, o'course - but then if it were that flat the car probably wouldn't run anyway (given that it probably uses the battery as a float rather than powering everything from the alternator, etc.)

*Never done it myself, mind you. I've bumped plenty of fuel-injected motorcycles, though..
Last edited by Von_Cheam on Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:39 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Locoluis » Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:39 pm UTC

Eshru wrote:Shouldn't vacuum be spelt vacwm? Isn't that the point of that letter?


No.

The "uu" in Latin "vacuum" is not a digraph, but two consecutive "u" vowels belonging to separate syllables. It's also distinct from Latin ū (a single long u).

The digraph VV/uu which became the letter W was used in Old High German to represent their /w/ sound, which was spelled Ƿ in Old English. The consonantal sound of the letter V had long since shifted from Classical Latin /w/ to Vulgar Latin /β/ or /v/, so it was no longer usable to write the Germanic /w/ sound.

There was never any reason to write any Latin word with the letter W, because the letters V and U sufficed to write the current consonantal and vowel sound of Latin, respectively.
Sueños del Sur - A webcomic about four siblings, their family, friends, adventures and dreams.
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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Quercus » Thu Sep 03, 2015 7:50 pm UTC

Von_Cheam wrote:
Quercus wrote:...and you can't really push start many modern cars anyway (e.g. if they are fuel injected or have a diesel engine).

I bet you can totally bump-start a fuel-injected car*! Provided the battery isn't so utterly flat that it can't even power the fuel-injectors, o'course - but then if it were that flat the car probably wouldn't run anyway (given that it probably uses the battery as a float rather than powering everything from the alternator, etc.)

*Never done it myself, mind you. I've bumped plenty of fuel-injected motorcycles, though..


Fair enough - thinking about it that's probably true of diesels too, provided there's enough power to run the glow plugs (actually, I think I might have bump started a diesel once before) - I was just going off of a quick google search.

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby JeffR23 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:59 pm UTC

I picked '4' on the scale because that's what I tend to rate things most when rating things on a scale of 1 to 5. Generally positive, but won't give top marks except rarely. (I've recently been informed that some consumer-response surveys of this sort treat everything not '5' as '0', but I refuse to let such buffoonery modify my behavior.)

And I'm surprised that I'm the first person here with 'guarantee' as their most misspelled word.

(Also, went with '2' for the 1-100 number, because I figured there are probably too many people trying to renormalize with '1' and '100'.)

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Re: 1572: "xkcd Survey"

Postby Flumble » Thu Sep 03, 2015 9:07 pm UTC

Does everyone here spell necessary/necessarily/necessity correctly most of the time?

Quercus wrote:I still don't like the fact that you can't push-start an automatic transmission

I have yet to see an automatic transmission that doesn't have a manual setting, but then again, I've only seen a couple. And I must confess that I have no idea what type of engines (beyond diesel or petrol) they have.


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