1816: "Mispronunciation"

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby GlassHouses » Tue Apr 04, 2017 2:20 am UTC

orthogon wrote:I've forgotten my GCSE history. Did the Syoo live in Illinwa?

No, the Illinwa lived in Illinwa, hence the name. :)

Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from? It doesn't necessarily have to make sense; after all, Anglophones also manage to pronounce the first part of Sault-Sainte-Marie as Soo, instead of So, and that is a 100% pure French name, no Native American origin whatsoever...

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Soupspoon » Tue Apr 04, 2017 9:48 am UTC

GlassHouses wrote:the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
According to Johnny Cash, it was a boy...

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby chridd » Tue Apr 04, 2017 2:23 pm UTC

GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
Probably because the "sy" cluster doesn't exist in (most dialects of) American English. ("Sue" is also pronounced "soo".)
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby PinkShinyRose » Tue Apr 04, 2017 3:00 pm UTC

chridd wrote:
GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
Probably because the "sy" cluster doesn't exist in (most dialects of) American English. ("Sue" is also pronounced "soo".)

I thought that's what anglophones said to cats they don't like. Also, just saying "see you" gets you closer than "soo".

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Showsni » Tue Apr 04, 2017 4:12 pm UTC

MRR wrote:
Mikeski wrote:So, does anyone else have any words that they (mentally) pronounced incorrectly because they read them long before they heard them spoken?

Not me, but a friend of mine had one that was so good that I chose to adopt it into my general language.

Misled pronounced "MY-zelled"

I think is sounds much better; He hypnotized me, he bamboozled me, he misled me.


Oh, I did that too. I thought it was a whole verb on its own, to misle people, entirely separate from the word mislead. Though I think I pronounced it more like mizzled than myzelled.

My Dad still makes fun of how I pronounced Monopoly the first time (with mo, no, po all rhyming with no).

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby chridd » Tue Apr 04, 2017 4:21 pm UTC

PinkShinyRose wrote:
chridd wrote:
GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
Probably because the "sy" cluster doesn't exist in (most dialects of) American English. ("Sue" is also pronounced "soo".)

I thought that's what anglophones said to cats they don't like. Also, just saying "see you" gets you closer than "soo".
Are you thinking "shoo" (/ʃu/)?
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby freezeblade » Tue Apr 04, 2017 4:27 pm UTC

PinkShinyRose wrote:
chridd wrote:
GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
Probably because the "sy" cluster doesn't exist in (most dialects of) American English. ("Sue" is also pronounced "soo".)

I thought that's what anglophones said to cats they don't like. Also, just saying "see you" gets you closer than "soo".


West Coast of the united states here (California), and everyone I know around here definitely pronounces it much closer to "soo" than "see you" definitely a homophone with "Sue" (as in the name, I feel the emphasis is slightly different when saying you are going to "sue" someone)
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby gmalivuk » Tue Apr 04, 2017 5:20 pm UTC

chridd wrote:
PinkShinyRose wrote:
chridd wrote:
GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:Turns out that Sioux is still pronounced Syoo in French; the Soo pronunciation is an Anglophone thing. I wonder where that comes from?
Probably because the "sy" cluster doesn't exist in (most dialects of) American English. ("Sue" is also pronounced "soo".)

I thought that's what anglophones said to cats they don't like. Also, just saying "see you" gets you closer than "soo".
Are you thinking "shoo" (/ʃu/)?
Yeah, the reason /sj/ doesn't exist in many dialects is because it's /ʃ/ instead. Hence the pronunciation of "sugar" and "sure".
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby da Doctah » Tue Apr 04, 2017 7:19 pm UTC

Showsni wrote:My Dad still makes fun of how I pronounced Monopoly the first time (with mo, no, po all rhyming with no).

I'm still trying to learn where the syllables and stresses are in Aeropostale.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Tue Apr 04, 2017 8:43 pm UTC

Ehh-rope-O'staleDo not trust anything I say here
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby GlassHouses » Tue Apr 04, 2017 11:10 pm UTC

da Doctah wrote:I'm still trying to learn where the syllables and stresses are in Aeropostale.

a é ro pos tale

...if you're talking about the French adjective meaning "of or related to air mail." In case you're talking about the American clothing store chain, I'm guessing Quizatzhaderac's answer is the right one.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby kalira » Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:01 pm UTC

da Doctah wrote:I'm still trying to learn where the syllables and stresses are in Aeropostale.


I believe the official pronunciation is "air-o-post-ALL" -- primary stress on final syllable, secondary (or no) stress on first syllable. I have heard it pronounced slightly differently as "air-o-post-AL" (as in the shortened form of Albert) as well, though.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Wed Apr 05, 2017 3:54 pm UTC

GlassHouses wrote:I'm guessing Quizatzhaderac's answer is the right one.
No, that was a joke answer and my worst possible guess.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby svenman » Fri Apr 07, 2017 9:19 am UTC

Showsni wrote:
MRR wrote:
Mikeski wrote:So, does anyone else have any words that they (mentally) pronounced incorrectly because they read them long before they heard them spoken?

Not me, but a friend of mine had one that was so good that I chose to adopt it into my general language.

Misled pronounced "MY-zelled"

I think is sounds much better; He hypnotized me, he bamboozled me, he misled me.


Oh, I did that too. I thought it was a whole verb on its own, to misle people, entirely separate from the word mislead. Though I think I pronounced it more like mizzled than myzelled.

My Dad still makes fun of how I pronounced Monopoly the first time (with mo, no, po all rhyming with no).

Sometimes I invent intentional mispronouncations of English words for fun. One of those was "misled" being pronounced as a homophone of "mild", by way of taking the pronunciation of "isle" and adding the two missing consonants to the beginning and end. Of course, by the same reasoning your putative verb *misle becomes a homophone of "mile".
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby da Doctah » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:03 pm UTC

kalira wrote:
da Doctah wrote:I'm still trying to learn where the syllables and stresses are in Aeropostale.


I believe the official pronunciation is "air-o-post-ALL" -- primary stress on final syllable, secondary (or no) stress on first syllable. I have heard it pronounced slightly differently as "air-o-post-AL" (as in the shortened form of Albert) as well, though.


Okay, but I'm still going to try and read it as "AIR-o-PAHST-uh-lee" the first time I see it. I can't seem to get the others to stick.

Now if someone could tell me what they were thinking when they came up with this, because it makes no sense in IPA:

Image

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby mathmannix » Fri Apr 07, 2017 1:12 pm UTC

da Doctah wrote:
Showsni wrote:My Dad still makes fun of how I pronounced Monopoly the first time (with mo, no, po all rhyming with no).

I'm still trying to learn where the syllables and stresses are in Aeropostale.

I don't think I've ever said it out loud, because I know I'm probably wrong, but I've always mentally pronounced the store "AIR-oh-Post-ah-LEE".

I know I'm just joining this thread, but reading through it, my mind has been blown so many times!
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At least I know I am mispronouncing hyperbole and epitome on purpose, but like ladycygnus wrote about epitome above, I mispronounce them automatically. Not sure if that's because I started it on purpose or just kept reinforcing it belligerently after I found out the true way to say them.

Some of these words - chimera, macabre, and sidereal - I know I'm going to go on mispronouncing anyway, partly because I'll forget and partly because I'm obstinate even if I don't forget. (Also bonafide has three syllables.) That's the beauty of American English - no one can tell us we're wrong because we believe in our individual right to think words are pronounced however the heck we feel like it. God bless America!

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ETA: OK, so I was looking up the pronunciation of bonafide on wiktionary, and it says that the American pronunciation has four choices
(and bear with me but I can't remember the "IPA" symbols, so I just use words that I think are unambiguous):
three I recognize - to rhyme with "Jonah hide", "Ghana hide", and the pretentious-looking Latinish "Jonah B-Day"
and one I don't think I've ever heard, but which is the one shared with the UK - rhymes with "Jonah Heidi". That's really how you say it in England? Boh-na-fy-dee?
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Soupspoon » Fri Apr 07, 2017 3:47 pm UTC

mathmannix wrote:one I don't think I've ever heard, but which is the one shared with the UK - rhymes with "Jonah Heidi". That's really how you say it in England? Boh-na-fy-dee?

I get the feeling that it is half tongue-in-cheek and half because-that's-how-we-hear-others-say-it(-perhaps-tongue-in-cheek) pronunciation, but it is a way we (plebian, not legally trained or otherwise classically educated) Brits say it

There'll be more subtle variations in interpretations than there are accents, though, and we have an awful lot of accents to start with. We can't even agree on "bath" or "book", or on when we're supposed to eat our dinner... ;)

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby chridd » Sat Apr 08, 2017 3:21 am UTC

da Doctah wrote:Now if someone could tell me what they were thinking when they came up with this, because it makes no sense in IPA:

Image
That's perfectly valid IPA, it's just not a possible English word. Must be some language with vowel length, tone, and the loch/Bach sound. And if I ever come across it and have to talk about it, I'll probably pronounce it [íxiːz] (eekheez, with a high tone on the first syllable and the second vowel longer), regardless of however it's supposed to be pronounced. (How is it supposed to be pronounced?)

Edit to add: oh, and I keep wanting to pronounce Nginx (the web server) as /ŋiŋks/ (rhymes with links and starts with the ng sound like in sing). Relatedly, I keep wanting to pronounce "Varnish Cache Server" (which I often see in error messages) as a verb phrase ("Hey! The website's down! Go varnish the cache server so it'll come back up!").
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Mikeski » Sat Apr 08, 2017 3:43 am UTC

chridd wrote:("Hey! The website's down! Go varnish the cache server so it'll come back up!").

"While you're back there, empty the bit bucket and clean the spam filters. And sweep up the dropped packets."

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Soupspoon » Sat Apr 08, 2017 9:00 am UTC

chridd wrote:Edit to add: oh, and I keep wanting to pronounce Nginx (the web server) as /ŋiŋks/ (rhymes with links and starts with the ng sound like in sing).

As I usually see an obvious Nginx page when the site behind it is going all "whoops!", for me it is "n jinx". (An arbitrary, but obviously currently non-zero, number of jinxes have beset the setup...)

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby orthogon » Tue Apr 11, 2017 12:48 pm UTC

chridd wrote:Edit to add: oh, and I keep wanting to pronounce Nginx (the web server) as /ŋiŋks/ (rhymes with links and starts with the ng sound like in sing). Relatedly, I keep wanting to pronounce "Varnish Cache Server" (which I often see in error messages) as a verb phrase ("Hey! The website's down! Go varnish the cache server so it'll come back up!").


What about "Hauppauge"? For some reason I thought the company was French, and went for something like /hɔpɔʒ/ (hoe-pohzh). Then I thought maybe I'd mis-remembered and in fact they were Belgian, and it should be /haʊ̯paʊ̯ɡə/ (how-powguh). Eventually somebody pointed out that on their website they say it should be pronounced "hop-hog" (I can't find the link now). Some of my colleagues go for that, but it sounds a bit daft, and in any case it later occurred to me that the page was written by upstate New Yorkers and that what they meant was that it should be pronounced by somebody saying "hop hog" in their accent. In other words, it's more like "haah paag" (there's a couple of YouTube videos that seem to confirm this).

For some reason I've gone back to my original totally wrong pseudo-French pronunciation.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby flicky1991 » Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:00 pm UTC

Soupspoon wrote:
mathmannix wrote:one I don't think I've ever heard, but which is the one shared with the UK - rhymes with "Jonah Heidi". That's really how you say it in England? Boh-na-fy-dee?

I get the feeling that it is half tongue-in-cheek and half because-that's-how-we-hear-others-say-it(-perhaps-tongue-in-cheek) pronunciation, but it is a way we (plebian, not legally trained or otherwise classically educated) Brits say it

I'd say it's definitely the usual way here. Pronouncing it like it's Latin sounds a bit pretentious, and the "rhymes with certified" pronunciation sounds American.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Soupspoon » Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:14 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:Pronouncing it like it's Latin sounds a bit pretentious,

And there's nothing hoi polloi like better than emphasising that they aren't the kind of people who get overly upset by things such as the use of the phrase "the hoi polloi".... ;)

(I'm speaking for οἱ πολλοί, rather than οἱ ὀλίγοι, I'm sure... :P)

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby GlassHouses » Tue Apr 11, 2017 1:33 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:What about "Hauppauge"? For some reason I thought the company was French, and went for something like /hɔpɔʒ/ (hoe-pohzh). Then I thought maybe I'd mis-remembered and in fact they were Belgian, and it should be /haʊ̯paʊ̯ɡə/ (how-powguh). Eventually somebody pointed out that on their website they say it should be pronounced "hop-hog" (I can't find the link now). Some of my colleagues go for that, but it sounds a bit daft, and in any case it later occurred to me that the page was written by upstate New Yorkers and that what they meant was that it should be pronounced by somebody saying "hop hog" in their accent.


Actually, Hauppauge the company, and Hauppauge the town, are in Long Island. I have never heard anyone pronounce that name, so I can't speak to the local-accent vs. commonly-accepted pronunciation, but for what it's worth, hop-pog is confirmed by Wikipedia. Also, New York State has a bunch of other place names with weird-yet-commonly-accepted pronunciations, like Ronkonkoma and Poughkeepsie.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Tue Apr 11, 2017 3:08 pm UTC

GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:What about "Hauppauge"? For some reason I thought the company was French, and went for something like /hɔpɔʒ/ (hoe-pohzh). Then I thought maybe I'd mis-remembered and in fact they were Belgian, and it should be /haʊ̯paʊ̯ɡə/ (how-powguh). Eventually somebody pointed out that on their website they say it should be pronounced "hop-hog" (I can't find the link now). Some of my colleagues go for that, but it sounds a bit daft, and in any case it later occurred to me that the page was written by upstate New Yorkers and that what they meant was that it should be pronounced by somebody saying "hop hog" in their accent.


Actually, Hauppauge the company, and Hauppauge the town, are in Long Island. I have never heard anyone pronounce that name, so I can't speak to the local-accent vs. commonly-accepted pronunciation, but for what it's worth, hop-pog is confirmed by Wikipedia. Also, New York State has a bunch of other place names with weird-yet-commonly-accepted pronunciations, like Ronkonkoma and Poughkeepsie.
I used to live about 15 miles from there.

Enunciate the first h.

The au diphthong is about halfway between the standard a and standard u (which does come out somewhere near the standard short o).

Both ps are pronounced, with the second one shortened, but not entirely eliminated. ("Mary" and "Marry" are pronounced differently in that dialect).

This sort of double consonant is also often followed by aspirating the next vowel more, sort of as if there was a psuedo silent h. I think that's what was going on with the recommended pronunciation of "hop-hog" as "hop-'og" wouldn't be too far off.

The g is a soft vowel sound at the end. Like in "lemon meringue pie".

As for the upstate New Yorkers who wrote the page, most of upstate New York is basically the Midwest is-so-far as their dialects go. This means some vowel mergers "au"->"o" and no double consonants "marry"->"mary"
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby orthogon » Tue Apr 11, 2017 4:37 pm UTC

GlassHouses wrote:
orthogon wrote:What about "Hauppauge"? For some reason I thought the company was French, and went for something like /hɔpɔʒ/ (hoe-pohzh). Then I thought maybe I'd mis-remembered and in fact they were Belgian, and it should be /haʊ̯paʊ̯ɡə/ (how-powguh). Eventually somebody pointed out that on their website they say it should be pronounced "hop-hog" (I can't find the link now). Some of my colleagues go for that, but it sounds a bit daft, and in any case it later occurred to me that the page was written by upstate New Yorkers and that what they meant was that it should be pronounced by somebody saying "hop hog" in their accent.


Actually, Hauppauge the company, and Hauppauge the town, are in Long Island. I have never heard anyone pronounce that name, so I can't speak to the local-accent vs. commonly-accepted pronunciation, but for what it's worth, hop-pog is confirmed by Wikipedia. Also, New York State has a bunch of other place names with weird-yet-commonly-accepted pronunciations, like Ronkonkoma and Poughkeepsie.


Oh, yeah. I was erroneously using "upstate NY" to mean "NY, but not NY, NY". I'd forgotten about Long Island.

I'm not disputing that "hop-hog" is a simple way to get people to pronounce it roughly correctly provided that those people are North Americans. I forgot to point out that my colleagues and I are of the British persuasion, so pronouncing it as a British person pronounces "hop hog" is not what was intended at all.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Znirk » Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:54 am UTC

Something similar to the "French Hauppauge" thing is common around here: I'm in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, and since we have a significant francophone region in the country, we tend to use quite a few French loan words - far more than your average German speaker from Germany would.

This has a side effect: By default any loan word is assumed to be French unless explicitly proven otherwise, and will be pronounced accordingly. Two English-derived examples I can think of off the top of my head are Grapefruit /'gʁɛpfʁwi/ and Folklore /fɔlk'lɔʁ/.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby orthogon » Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:36 am UTC

Znirk wrote:Something similar to the "French Hauppauge" thing is common around here: I'm in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, and since we have a significant francophone region in the country, we tend to use quite a few French loan words - far more than your average German speaker from Germany would.

This has a side effect: By default any loan word is assumed to be French unless explicitly proven otherwise, and will be pronounced accordingly. Two English-derived examples I can think of off the top of my head are Grapefruit /'gʁɛpfʁwi/ and Folklore /fɔlk'lɔʁ/.


Excellent: that reminds me - I had a colleague who pronounced "Tortoise" (the graphical SVN/git client for Windows) as a French word (/tɔʁtwaz/) and this pronunciation has stuck with me ever since. Another colleague facetiously pronounces "anglepoise" as though it were a French word anglépois. We're also prone, in those triumphant moments where something suddenly starts working, to exclaim "Bonjour la classe!" or "Bonjour Trieste!" (I assume the latter is a corruption of Bonjour Tristesse, but to be honest the origins are lost in the mists of time.

Basically the French language and the abuse thereof is the source of much amusement in our office.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby flicky1991 » Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:55 pm UTC

I've heard there's a similar thing in Japan where they assume European loanwords are probably from English, leading to shops with English translations on their signs selling "pain" (since they use the French word for bread).
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Mikeski » Wed Apr 12, 2017 4:24 pm UTC

flicky1991 wrote:I've heard there's a similar thing in Japan where they assume European loanwords are probably from English, leading to shops with English translations on their signs selling "pain" (since they use the French word for bread).


The Japanese actually use the Portuguese word for "bread": "pan". (And the English word for "pan": "pan"). But, like the "Au Bon Pain" bakery chain selling good pain in the USA, they could certainly have French-style shops selling pain there, too.

"Pan" can actually refer to "bread", or "pastries", or "sandwiches" in Japanese. (Sometimes, anyway... yakisoba on bread is usually "yakisoba-pan", but a pork cutlet on bread is usually "katsu-sando"). Sort of the same way we got that "if they have no bread, let them eat cake" quote in English, even though the "cake" in the original quote was "brioche", which most English-speakers would also call "bread". "If they have no cheap bread, let them eat expensive bread" doesn't have the same ring to it, though.

Loanwords break the other way, too... English "glass" becomes both "garasu" and "gurasu" in Japanese, the former is the material you make windows from, and the latter is an object you drink from. (And the latter is a homophone for the loanword "grass" due to the L/R thing.)

There is something to the French idea of coining a new official French word for everything, rather than using loanwords...

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby orthogon » Wed Apr 12, 2017 4:40 pm UTC

Mikeski wrote:
flicky1991 wrote:I've heard there's a similar thing in Japan where they assume European loanwords are probably from English, leading to shops with English translations on their signs selling "pain" (since they use the French word for bread).


The Japanese actually use the Portuguese word for "bread": "pan". (And the English word for "pan": "pan"). But, like the "Au Bon Pain" bakery chain selling good pain in the USA, they could certainly have French-style shops selling pain there, too.

"Pan" can actually refer to "bread", or "pastries", or "sandwiches" in Japanese. (Sometimes, anyway... yakisoba on bread is usually "yakisoba-pan", but a pork cutlet on bread is usually "katsu-sando"). Sort of the same way we got that "if they have no bread, let them eat cake" quote in English, even though the "cake" in the original quote was "brioche", which most English-speakers would also call "bread". "If they have no cheap bread, let them eat expensive bread" doesn't have the same ring to it, though.

Loanwords break the other way, too... English "glass" becomes both "garasu" and "gurasu" in Japanese, the former is the material you make windows from, and the latter is an object you drink from. (And the latter is a homophone for the loanword "grass" due to the L/R thing.)

There is something to the French idea of coining a new official French word for everything, rather than using loanwords...


In Colombia (and maybe elsewhere in South America) they have something called "Pan cook", which is a kind of round loaf of bread, hollowed out and filled with tasty stuff (I had a creamy mushroom one). I don't know how they came up with that mix of languages, but who cares, they're delicious and ought to be available everywhere!

Pseudo-edit: Apparently it's "Panne cook", which is even stranger. Here is one:
Spoiler:
Image
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Apr 12, 2017 5:14 pm UTC

That's a breadbowl! Common to fill them with soups (pea soup is the one I see most) in America.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Reka » Wed Apr 12, 2017 8:03 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:In Colombia (and maybe elsewhere in South America) they have something called "Pan cook", which is a kind of round loaf of bread, hollowed out and filled with tasty stuff (I had a creamy mushroom one). I don't know how they came up with that mix of languages, but who cares, they're delicious and ought to be available everywhere!

Pseudo-edit: Apparently it's "Panne cook", which is even stranger. Here is one:
Spoiler:
Image

Yep, that's a bread bowl. Never seen pea soup served in one; the quintessential food-item-served-in-a-bread-bowl in my experience is clam chowder. (The real stuff, not the abomination with tomatoes and no cream.)

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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby freezeblade » Wed Apr 12, 2017 8:23 pm UTC

Bonus points if it is "wharf style" sourdough bread. I've never seen pea soup in one either.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby Pfhorrest » Wed Apr 12, 2017 8:25 pm UTC

Oh yeah I've seen clam chowder in bread bowls too, though clam chowder is not really a thing on my radar so it didn't come to mind. To my taste, clam chowder is a perfectly good potato soup ruined by some slimy seafood.

Speaking of which, I've also seen potato soup served in bread bowls. And tomato soup too, I think.
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Re: 1816: "Mispronunciation"

Postby mathmannix » Tue May 02, 2017 7:45 pm UTC

You can get them at Panera's with whatever you want in them. I like the broccoli cheese soup.
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