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1824: "Identification Chart"

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:04 am UTC
by wagga
Image
Title text:
Be careful—it's breeding season, and some of these can be *extremely* defensive of their nests.


Wedgetail - most lethal 737 -you probably think it flies inverted down under.

Fixed for first post formatting issues. Can people please make sure that it contains:
image
link to image (can be embedded in image)
title text

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:06 am UTC
by bachaddict
Where's the Warthog? It hits harder than any of these!

BTW you want this in your post:

Image
Title text:
Be careful—it's breeding season, and some of these can be *extremely* defensive of their nests.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:15 am UTC
by Eutychus
This reminds me of Roger Dean's cover for the Budgie album Squawk.

Dean cannibalised a model aircraft and grafted an actual bird's skull onto the front, and then set out to photograph it, but couldn't get the focal depth required, so ended up doing a painting of his model.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:27 am UTC
by rhomboidal
I have a real passion for birdwatching -- with my early-warning surveillance radar array.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:29 am UTC
by wagga
Warthogs don't fly. The A10 is simply a mobility appliance for The Gun.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:49 am UTC
by treblemaker
They all look like weather balloons to me.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:15 am UTC
by RAGBRAIvet
wagga wrote:Warthogs don't fly. The A10 is simply a mobility appliance for The Gun.

How did the A-10 get designed?

The Air Force said "Take one of these":
Image

"Next, make us a gun that will fire about 4200 of them per minute":
Image

"Now, build us an airplane around it":
Image

And there you have it.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:31 am UTC
by Mike Rosoft

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 10:37 am UTC
by Soupspoon
Now do the P-51 Mustang or the Vicars Vickers Wellington... ;)

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 12:53 pm UTC
by Cygnwulf
The only problem with Warthogs and mustangs and such is that they don't have their own wings to replace the wings on an aircraft of the same name.

That said, I think I need a poster of this.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 12:54 pm UTC
by flicky1991
Cygnwulf wrote:The only problem with Warthogs and mustangs and such is that they don't have their own wings

Even without context, this is true.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:07 pm UTC
by qvxb
Hornet (Hudson), Falcon (Ford), Eagle (AMC), Hawk (Studebaker). How many do you remember?

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:08 pm UTC
by DennyMo
I'll need to update this chart. :)
US Military Aircraft Identification Training.png

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:25 pm UTC
by Soupspoon
Cygnwulf wrote:The only problem with Warthogs and mustangs and such is that they don't have their own wings to replace the wings on an aircraft of the same name.
I note with interest and looming anticipation that you didn't explictly diss the idea of the Wellington... :P

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:30 pm UTC
by cellocgw
Soupspoon wrote:
Cygnwulf wrote:The only problem with Warthogs and mustangs and such is that they don't have their own wings to replace the wings on an aircraft of the same name.
I note with interest and looming anticipation that you didn't explictly diss the idea of the Wellington... :P


Randall was going to include the Wellington but it got the boot.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:45 pm UTC
by richP
What about Puff the magic dragon?

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:58 pm UTC
by Reka
cellocgw wrote:Randall was going to include the Wellington but it got the boot.

THWACK!!!

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 2:17 pm UTC
by da Doctah
qvxb wrote:Hornet (Hudson), Falcon (Ford), Eagle (AMC), Hawk (Studebaker). How many do you remember?


My parents actually had a Ford Falcon, starting around 1966.

I always thought Ford missed a bet not bringing out a retro edition for Y2K. Who wouldn't want to own their very own Millennium Falcon?

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 4:30 pm UTC
by wumpus
DennyMo wrote:I'll need to update this chart. :)
US Military Aircraft Identification Training.png


Note that Robert Heinlein repeatedly mentioned Samuel Renshaw's work (mostly in Citizen of the Galaxy, but also in Friday with a cameo in Stranger in a Strange Land and a few more). As far as I know, the only practical aspect was helping ID "friend or foe" aircraft visually. Presumably this was declassified (and the charts updated) since anti-aircraft gunners couldn't visually ID jets before it was too late. There was supposed to be a followup paper (no idea how common such wording was in the 1940s, certainly funding issues were wildly different) but I never saw anything (so could be null data or military censorship, can't tell).

Then vs. now:
Time to look this up in a large library (McKeldin Library, University of Maryland). ~1 hour [before internet search engines]
Time to confirm this at an even bigger one (Library of Congress, Washington DC) ~all day [before the green [subway] line]
Time to check if I missed anything with google ~ 1 minute [nowadays]

In other related weirdness, in junior high we had a somewhat irregular class mixed with our shop class were we were in some sort of speed-reading training. Basically a whole class of (not academically sorted) boys watched a filmstrip that only showed a word at a time as it opened a narrow window from left to right. After all that "training", we still could always read faster/better if the strip showed an entire line at a time. No idea if they tried training the next class with the "line at a time" method or just gave up. I haven't heard of many people getting the same training.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:43 pm UTC
by cellocgw
wumpus wrote:In other related weirdness, in junior high we had a somewhat irregular class mixed with our shop class were we were in some sort of speed-reading training. Basically a whole class of (not academically sorted) boys watched a filmstrip that only showed a word at a time as it opened a narrow window from left to right. After all that "training", we still could always read faster/better if the strip showed an entire line at a time. No idea if they tried training the next class with the "line at a time" method or just gave up. I haven't heard of many people getting the same training.


I was forced to go thru that same alleged tool for improved reading. At the time I complained to the (English class) teacher that not being able to read a full line at a time was painful. Some of the junk "educators" come up with is just plain amazing for its stupidity.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:45 pm UTC
by squall_line
bachaddict wrote:Where's the Warthog? It hits harder than any of these!

BTW you want this in your post:
Spoiler:
Image
Title text:
Be careful—it's breeding season, and some of these can be *extremely* defensive of their nests.


You probably also want

Code: Select all

[url=https://xkcd.com/1824/][/url]
in there somewhere, either on its own: https://xkcd.com/1824/ or, preferably, wrapped around the image: Image

Assuming that you want to get within the ballpark of the Rules for 'Individual XKCD Comic Threads, of course.

YMMV.

In other news, I think I may have preferred to see the outline of the props on the tilt-rotors of the Osprey.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Fri Apr 14, 2017 9:36 pm UTC
by jc
cellocgw wrote:
wumpus wrote:In other related weirdness, ... After all that "training", we still could always read faster/better if the strip showed an entire line at a time. No idea if they tried training the next class with the "line at a time" method or just gave up. I haven't heard of many people getting the same training.


I was forced to go thru that same alleged tool for improved reading. At the time I complained to the (English class) teacher that not being able to read a full line at a time was painful. Some of the junk "educators" come up with is just plain amazing for its stupidity.


I remember reading a number of articles back in the 60s and 70s about the history of the newspaper industry. One thing often mentioned was that they developed their rather narrow column width (supposedly back in the 1800s) by doing experiments to determine a width (at arm's length) that the majority of readers could understand without scanning their eyes left and right. The width chosen allowed most readers to just aim at the middle of the column, scan vertically, and understand all the text in each line. This gave the fastest reading times. So for modern educators to use a word-at-a-time left-to-right scan approach would seem to indicate ignorance of some reading "technology" that isn't exactly modern. ;-)

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 8:37 am UTC
by Soupspoon
squall_line wrote:In other news, I think I may have preferred to see the outline of the props on the tilt-rotors of the Osprey.
The lack of the pegasus-engine vector nozzles in the Harrier bothered me, given the actual (non)coverage of the avian wings on the (sort of) AV-8A silhouette. But that's from memory, so maybe they are more flush.

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 10:07 am UTC
by McBee
For warthogs, mustangs and so on, maybe just do it backwards - use the plane's wings on the animal body.

I would've love to see the Aardvark...

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:35 pm UTC
by rmsgrey
cellocgw wrote:
wumpus wrote:In other related weirdness, in junior high we had a somewhat irregular class mixed with our shop class were we were in some sort of speed-reading training. Basically a whole class of (not academically sorted) boys watched a filmstrip that only showed a word at a time as it opened a narrow window from left to right. After all that "training", we still could always read faster/better if the strip showed an entire line at a time. No idea if they tried training the next class with the "line at a time" method or just gave up. I haven't heard of many people getting the same training.


I was forced to go thru that same alleged tool for improved reading. At the time I complained to the (English class) teacher that not being able to read a full line at a time was painful. Some of the junk "educators" come up with is just plain amazing for its stupidity.


Yeah, word-boundaries aren't the best place to break things up - compound nouns, adjectival and adverbial phrases, etc, all argue for longer units as the basic unit of sense, rather than putting a break after every space, while many longer words are themselves compounds that could reasonably be broken up into their component parts...

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 4:46 pm UTC
by GlassHouses
Things I Learned Today:
RAGBRAIvet wrote:Image

The A-10's gun can belch out so much smoke, it can make the engines flame out. To prevent this from happening, the engines' igniters are automatically turned on when the gun is fired.

Awesome. 8-)

Re: 1824: "Identification Chart"

Posted: Tue Apr 18, 2017 9:48 am UTC
by peteispo
Kestrel could have the same outline as Harrier - the prototype for the Harrier was the P.1127 Kestrel...
We could also include Gannet (UK Royal Navy torpedo bomber), Merlin (Navy helicopter) and Raven (electronic-countermeasures variant of the FB111)

Re: 1824: Identification Chart

Posted: Tue May 02, 2017 8:09 pm UTC
by mathmannix
treblemaker wrote:They all look like weather balloons to me.

They all look like mimic octopodes to me.