0488: "Steal This Comic"

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Gelsamel
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Gelsamel » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:36 am UTC

You do realise that
DMCA 1201 says wrote:1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems

(a) Violations Regarding Circumvention of Technological Measures. — (1)(A) No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.


So....

If you're gonna complain about DRM, complaining about iTunes is the last thing you should be doing. It's so laughably easy to remove that it isn't funny- just burn it to a CD.


You'd be a criminal anyway, just like the comic says.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby redfive86 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:36 am UTC

I'm a big fan of the iTunes store, not gonna lie. And I have never spent a cent of my own money in the store. It has so many shiny free things on it, which I have to thank for introducing me to several of my Very Favorite Bands. Plus, when relatives don't know what to get me for a holiday, they just send me iTunes gift cards. It's lovely, and I can avoid the awkward "how did you find out this music, it's from an obscure country?" questions which can only lead to awkward rambling discussions which end in a failed attempt to explain how I interact with people on the internet. (And, y'know, they think I'm weird enough already)

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby jamesh » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:46 am UTC

The Amazon music store isn't an option outside of the US. Given that I can buy other things from Amazon, this must be up to the music industry. This would put them into the anti-globalisation camp.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Kohlrabi » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:52 am UTC

jakerman999 wrote:all it took me was the I-tunes version, and a CD version. located the differences in the file when they where compacted in winRar, and BAM!erased the DRM.(winRar, as it's easier to sort through everything)

This sounds extremely fishy. Why do you go through the hassle of compressing the files? What is a CD version actually?
The CD tracks ripped to .WAV? You can't really compare (lossless) WAV/PCM to (lossy) AAC or MP3 files
The CD version ripped and converted to MP3/AAC? Then it would depend on the codec used for compression, unless the iTunes MP3/AAC-Codec is used the files wouldn't really comparable, though the header would be differnt, probably.
Still, compressing the result with RAR will make the header unidentifiable, which because of that seems like a pointless endeavour for removing DRM.

So, in the end that means you get all the music you buy from iTunes on CD as well, convert it using the same Codec iTunes uses, compress it with rar and use diff to erase the DRM? I for one can hardly believe that. Besides, why would anyone who has access to the CD buy the music from iTunes as well?


Lure+Breaker wrote:The problem is not the player, but my computer. It's not good enough.

I would guess that your MKV files actually hold HD content encoded with a H264 encoder, popularly called 720p or 1080p, which take some serious processing (CPU) power to play back compared to MPEG1/MPEG2. MKV itself is just a container for media data, so I doubt it takes a noticeable higher amount of processing power to play back videos in MKV than videos in AVI.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby hotaru » Mon Oct 13, 2008 9:59 am UTC

StClair wrote:If you're not a big audio nerd and just want something to listen to on crappy speakers and/or earbuds, this is "good enough." I do it all the time with my iTunes songs.

you can get earbuds that are good enough to hear the difference between 212kbps mp3 and 240kbps mp3 for less than $10. and somehow most mp3 encoders manage to distort things just right so that it really gets on my nerves, especially when encoding VBR mp3. i'm not a huge audio nerd, but it's really annoying when things sound almost right but not quite.

Gelsamel wrote:You do realise that
DMCA 1201 says wrote:1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems

(a) Violations Regarding Circumvention of Technological Measures. — (1)(A) No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.


i definitely wouldn't say that DRM as weak as what's currently being used "effectively controls access" to the content...

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Arkan
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Arkan » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:01 am UTC

Gelsamel wrote:You do realise that
DMCA 1201 says wrote:1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems

(a) Violations Regarding Circumvention of Technological Measures. — (1)(A) No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title.


So....

If you're gonna complain about DRM, complaining about iTunes is the last thing you should be doing. It's so laughably easy to remove that it isn't funny- just burn it to a CD.


You'd be a criminal anyway, just like the comic says.


I'm reasonably certain iTunes itself tells you that you can remove the DRM (or at least, convert it from whatever iTunes uses to MP3, which has the same result) by burning it to CD.

EDIT: At the very least, the program encourages you to burn your crap to CD to back it up, and at this point I think that if they didn't intend that burning CDs removed their DRM that they would have closed that loophole - it's pretty blatantly obvious.

EDIT 2: Did I mention that when I do this, it's using iTunes to burn the CDs? They remove their own DRM.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Nomic » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:20 am UTC

Funnily enough I was just thinking about torrenting some songs when I read this comic. Randall, get out of my head!

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby eddie.edwards » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:21 am UTC

I am deeply impressed by the irony of condoning piracy in a comic that's published under a restricted CC license.

Seriously, though, if DRM is wrong/immoral then there's a strong argument to say that cracking DRM off the stuff you paid for is a legitimate action. It might be "illegal" but it's not immoral, which makes it preferable to piracy, assuming you care about the moral status of your actions. So the basic precept of the comic is pretty flawed IMHO. Just because two actions are equally "illegal" doesn't make them equally preferable.

Hopefully most readers will be smart enough to work this out for themselves. Reading these comments it appears not.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Skateside » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:50 am UTC

'; DROP DATABASE;-- wrote:Has DRM ever done any good?

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby musashi1600 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:52 am UTC

'; DROP DATABASE;-- wrote:What bothers me about digital music is first, there's DRM. Then when you complain about that, there's the people saying "just get the DRM-free MP3s from iTunes or Amazon." That only solves half the problem. It doesn't change the fact that MP3 files are lossy, which means A) lower quality than a CD, and B) inability to convert to another format without further reduction in quality. This is why I buy the CDs; because they are DRM-free and lossless. Until I can download FLAC files from iTunes and Amazon, I'm not interested.


As people before me have mentioned, you can use iTunes to burn purchased music to CDs that will remove the DRM. Normal audio CDs burned by iTunes (not MP3 CDs) are meant to work in normal players, the same as store-bought CDs, and will also have a lossless format.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Kemp » Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:58 am UTC

musashi1600 wrote:As people before me have mentioned, you can use iTunes to burn purchased music to CDs that will remove the DRM. Normal audio CDs burned by iTunes (not MP3 CDs) are meant to work in normal players, the same as store-bought CDs, and will also have a lossless format.


Converting a lossy encoded file to a lossless format (such as burning your downloaded music to CD) doesn't magically improve it, you just have a perfect copy of your imperfect file.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Amnesiasoft » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:02 am UTC

If you're sneaky enough, you can play DRMed iTunes music without using authorizations...

...that, and yeah, you completely missed iTunes Plus, as others have mentioned. And I'd say AAC is a better format than MP3 anyway. Cut the size of the FLCL soundtrack almost in half for me :P

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby l_bratch » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:06 am UTC

Mane wrote:You're never going to convince companies to stop going about the DRMing their stuff, by stealing their stuff. Just like you're not going to convince a store to stop pressing shoplifting charges by stealing their stuff.
It's not just like that all. One thing is theft, the other is copyright infringement.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby cygnus » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:22 am UTC

I will never buy music online. MP3's are simply not worth my money, especially with the sheer volume of music I have (over 4000 songs and counting). I only ever buy music in CD form, but the problem here is that I cannot possibly hope to find most of the stuff I have in any shop, especially in New Zealand. It is practically impossible to find anything besides pop rock in a shop here, let alone something like Ghosts on Magnetic Tape by Bass Communion, or any of the other obscure albums in my digital collection. As a matter of fact, even Amazon doesn't have that album, and I have more obscure stuff than that. What am I to do now?

So I use my sources (namely warez boards, or torrents when I absolutely have to) and sure, maybe that makes me a criminal, but I just don't care. I need my music like any audiophile, and when I can afford it, I buy a CD or two. I can't go to many concerts seeing as there aren't many in New Zealand to start with. Thank goodness for bands like Nine Inch Nails.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Silicon Jedi » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:33 am UTC

Lame. Man, so lame. This comic was as lame as the DRM it decries. It came across as a humorless screed, conflating morality and legality.

Okay, so there is no difference between jaywalking and shooting you in the face? i'm a CRIMINAL either way right?

There is a world of moral difference between copyright infringement on music you have never purchased and format shifting music for personal use.

I do both, just one I don't feel bad about.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Gelsamel » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:40 am UTC

I believe that despite moral differences piracy and violating DRM have the same legal repercussions. May be wrong there.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby melaniemrms » Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:00 pm UTC

Download a program called Tune Bite. It costs a little bit of money, but it converts protected files. I found it after I joined Spiralfrog.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby HPDDJ » Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:30 pm UTC

People are buying music legally online? The shame!

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby phlip » Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:46 pm UTC

eddie.edwards wrote:I am deeply impressed by the irony of condoning piracy in a comic that's published under a restricted CC license.

You'd prefer he condoned piracy in a comic with a if-you-do-anything-other-than-look-at-it-I'll-cut-your-balls-off license?

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby melaniemrms » Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:48 pm UTC

My father is a photographer, so my family has always been a little sensitive to copyright issues. As long as I get music legally or from a friend (emailing me a song they want to hear, or from spiralfog and I convert it), I don't feel as if I'm doing anything majorly wrong. I also buy a good deal of music from iTunes, which is what I spend money on. If everyone was forced to actually PAY for at least some of their music, it wouldn't be a big deal. I don't see myself as being entitled to having every song that I want free, and I don't understand how other people feel so entitled.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby theyranos » Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:55 pm UTC

This post is 100% spam, but since no one has mentioned it yet, http://jamendo.com offers CC-licensed music that you can torrent legally.
Had enough arguing about xkcd? Perhaps I can refer you to a crappy comic of my own.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby just john » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:12 pm UTC

Brilliant comic!

In return, I grant you permission to download ALL my music, FOR FREE, and WITHOUT DRM!!

(Okay, you could do that yesterday even before I saw the comic, but still ...) (And if you must spend money, I can accommodate you also.)


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It's a shorter version of "the day the music died".

Postby grendelkhan » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:17 pm UTC

I'm reminded of Mark Pilgrim's the day the music died. I suppose it's way, way easier to get people to read a short comic helpfully narrated by Black Hat than to make them read through a more in-depth post, and some of the more explanatory comments below.
Arkan wrote:I'm reasonably certain iTunes itself tells you that you can remove the DRM (or at least, convert it from whatever iTunes uses to MP3, which has the same result) by burning it to CD.

Yes, and Microsoft's PlaysForSure allows that as well; in fact, I believe it was actually suggested by at least one employee when PlaysForSure shut down. Take a moment to appreciate that--they'll come after you with hatchets and hammers if you strip the DRM from their files... sometimes. Strip the DRM with FairUse4WM? Take him away, boys! Strip the DRM by burning and re-ripping? Carry on, friend!

I have trouble envisioning the legal mumbo-jumbo that got us to this point, but it must be byzantine indeed.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Minstrel » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:18 pm UTC

I've even been turned off from buying CD's after the Sony rootkit debacle. As well as any Sony product at all if I can help it.

I listen to so little music these days that I've not really even thought about the DRM issue much, but for what it's worth: yo ho ho and a bottle of OGG for me.

And a second for Magnatune.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Alzheimers » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:19 pm UTC

In a related note, I'd like to send out a big FUCK YOU to Realtek for disabling the "Record from Mixer" option of my soundcard, in the name of anti-piracy measures.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Kazuke » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:25 pm UTC

I pirate most of my media because it saves me lots of money that is better spent on other things.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby haliblix » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:29 pm UTC

I've been buying stuff from the amazon mp3 music store like crazy once they trumped iTunes with the selection but now that I've gotten pretty much everything I've wanted I've been getting into vinyl. No DRM, no loudness, lossless. I'm not one of those who pretend to hear the difference between digital and analog but there's definitely a different experience listening to music on vinyl. Maybe its the fact of taking more effort to play something other than just hitting a play button. Maybe it's the fact that you get more than just the music and something physical that represents the band.

Either way, I'm never ever going to buy another CD or even give a second thought to anything with the words DRM involved.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby OmegaLord » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:34 pm UTC

Re: Everyone who says "just burn a CD"
I know people who have 10,000 songs on their iPod. Now if they got a Zune, shall we say, then they would be burning close to 1,000 CDs. That's a lot. Even with CD-RW, I think you can get up to 4x I've see, that's still 250, so unless you plan to get a whole lot of CDs... Go with soundtaxi, it's surprisingly effective on DRM but quite illegal, so I probably wouldn't buy it just for the "paper" trail.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby SirMustapha » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:39 pm UTC

... but... but mommy says illegally downloading music is WRONG WRONG WRONG, and I'll be cool if I pay my eyeballs for music instead of the whole year's supply of food and dismiss all those uncool pirates for not giving even more money to people who don't even need it!

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby The Coincidence » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:44 pm UTC

I steal the vast majority of my music. I also go to many, many concerts every year, and I own a ton of band-related t-shirts and sweatshirts. I enjoy the feeling that my money tends to help the artists more than the corporate heads. I certainly don't appreciate that only .02 cents a song that I'd buy from iTunes would actually go to the band.

This is probably the best "review" of the music industry that I have ever read. Yes, I was a member of OiNK. Yes, I am currently a member of what.cd. And honestly, they are services that I would gladly pay $20+ a month for.

Considering that the aging dinosaur known as the music industry continuously shoots down any type of effort to reform the system, I feel no remorse. I remember a plan proposed awhile ago that would tag an extra $10 or so on to your ISP bill that would cover any music that you would download. That extra $10 - from almost anybody using the internet - would go to the labels. Not a perfect plan, but it would be a good start. It got shot down by the big wigs with hardly a look.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby DragonHawk » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:53 pm UTC

TL;DR types: Actual thought ahead. You can skip this post.

General replies, in no particular order:

I prefer the term "copy restricted" over terms like "copy protected" and "Digital Rights Management". It more accurately describes the technological measures. This isn't about protecting copies, or managing rights. It's about restricting copies. (The "Digital Restrictions Management" turn-about is nice, but I feel it empowers the copyright cartels by using even a corrupted version of their term. Besides, it is too cumbersome, and the abbreviation loses the message.)

With regards to getting around iTunes DRM by burning a CD: I think the point is that I shouldn't have to do that. I know I feel that if I've paid money for music, I should not have to jump through hoops to listen to it. For this sort of reason, I have never paid money for copy-restricted ("DRM") music. I didn't before iTunes came along, I continued that practice with iTunes, and I have continued that practice when other things came out after iTunes. The fact that iTunes is only one of the perpetrators of this customer control tactic doesn't make iTunes better. The fact that iTunes now also offers unrestricted selections does not make the restricted ones okay. I've got no beef with iTunes in particular, but I do object to any kind of distribution which suffers from technical restrictions.

To people claiming circumventing copy restrictions ("cracking") is an easy "third option": Assuming you are convicted in a court of law, that makes you a criminal, which is the whole message of this comic. Way to miss the point.

I believe the DMCA does indeed make circumvention of copy restrictions a criminal offense. US Code, Title 17, Chapter 12, Section 1204. (ULCA summary.)

The pundit in me cannot resist pointing out that CDs are also "digital music".

If I am going to pay money for music, I generally want a lossless format (like FLAC) over lossy formats (like MP3, AAC, Ogg). Generally I only pay money for music in lossy formats if it's a song I'm buying for casual listening because I had minor interest in it -- sort of a "one-off". If I'm paying money for an album, or even for a single song I really like, I want a lossless format. Fortunately, CDs are still available, and their design generally makes technological copy restriction infeasible.

I see the recording industry getting upset about how people such as myself are using their "product" (e.g., copying to other media, such as from CD to MP3). They don't seem to want me to do that. I am happy to comply with their wishes by not purchasing their product. I wish there was some way to make the recording industry effectively realize that CD sales may be down not just because of iPod's, but because some of us vote with our wallets.

That is, indeed, how I prefer to respond to any kind of customer control tactic: I stop being the customer.

I don't endorse or engage in deliberate copyright infringement ("piracy"), again for the same reasons: It's their "product". If they want me to not listen to it, I'm happy to comply. Ideally, eventually enough people will do this that the record labels change their ways. Some progress has been made on this front (e.g., unrestricted music in iTunes), so I have some hope.

I see one possible outcome being a shift from a small number of mainstream artists to a larger number of artists, each with a smaller following. With traditional record distribution, mass production of the records necessitated mass production of music, and thus a smaller number of artists. I have some hope that the more flexible distribution the Internet enables will lead to more creativity and variety in the commercial music world.
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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Magus2914 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 1:56 pm UTC

Lazy Tommy wrote:I own about 270 music CDs, and I copied some of them to CD-R so I could play them in my car (while keeping the originals at home), and "ripped" most of them to mp3 so I can play them on my iPod. As far as I know, I'm not breaking any laws here...

musashi1600 wrote:As people before me have mentioned, you can use iTunes to burn purchased music to CDs that will remove the DRM.

Silicon Jedi wrote:There is a world of moral difference between copyright infringement on music you have never purchased and format shifting music for personal use.

Says you guys. The RIAA, and by extension the music industry, don't see any difference between downloading music and ripping/burning music. By current copyright laws, you have to buy a song on both a CD and on iTunes if you want a copy for both your CD player and computer. Paying once and using the music you bought for both is illegal.
musashi1600 wrote:As people before me have mentioned, you can use iTunes to burn purchased music to CDs that will remove the DRM.

If you think that it's legal to burn iTunes music to CD just because it lets you, then you're saddly mistaken.

Is it illegal? You bet your ass it is. Is it immoral? Well, you can figure that out on your own.

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No; you're wrong.

Postby grendelkhan » Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:13 pm UTC

Magus2914 wrote:If you think that it's legal to burn iTunes music to CD just because it lets you, then you're saddly mistaken.
I don't know about iTunes, but when Microsoft announced the end of support for PlaysForSure, they actually did officially recommend using the rip/burn cycle to strip their DRM. (I believe that at least one DRM system disallows burning to CD-RWs, so you have to burn a stack of coasters, but hey, don't you want to support the artists?)

Now, if you can figure out why the same folks stumble over themselves to stop you from using other methods of DRM-stripping, then you're a smarter fellow than I am.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby WeightedCompanionCube » Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:14 pm UTC

You think Randall was inspired do this comic by Cory's ranting on BB about WalllllllllllllllllllllllMart? Cory straight up stated on BB "Only people who pay for music deal with DRM" As justified, fast, and loose with the facts Cory is most of the time, all the bad press did get WaMart to keep the DRM servers up 'for the present time'... I don't know if that's a good thing, weaning people off DRM gently. They won't mind the taste of it so much in the future.

And not everything on iTunes is available in DRM-free Plus. It's up to the label, so yeah, don't blame Apple. It still sucks. Not only are the 'nonplussed' tracks DRM protected, they don't compare to a good rip. I rip my CDs at better than 128K AAC. If I can't buy music in iTunes Plus, my next stop is Soulseek or TPB, so Apple still loses a sale. I do like having a CD collection, so I might pick up a used CD of the stuff I pirate on Amazon at some point.

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Sceptre » Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:15 pm UTC

iTunes isn't the best thing to criticise; the store wouldn't even exist if Steve Jobs refused to put DRM on the files (he was pretty much forced to put it on, and feels the same way we do about DRM).

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Re: Steal This Comic

Postby WeightedCompanionCube » Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:21 pm UTC

Magus2914 wrote:If you think that it's legal to burn iTunes music to CD just because it lets you, then you're saddly mistaken.

Is it illegal? You bet your ass it is. Is it immoral? Well, you can figure that out on your own.


It is unquestionably LEGAL.

The DMCA is concerned with circumventing copy protection measures. If the DRM will authorize you to burn an unprotected copy, there's no circumvention involved.

The RIAA once made, and quickly had to retract, a statement along the lines of "ripping CDs is illegal". They meant to say that "Circumventing measuses on copy-protected CDs in order to rip them is illegal"

fedexrico
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Joined: Thu May 08, 2008 10:11 pm UTC

Re: "Steal This Comic" Discussion

Postby fedexrico » Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:58 pm UTC

I live in Argentina. Down here, there is no such thing as "buying software" or "paying for music". It just doesn't happen.

Enjoy your moral dilemmas, guys :D

Your.Master
Posts: 52
Joined: Mon Jan 08, 2007 10:03 pm UTC

Re: Steal This Comic

Postby Your.Master » Mon Oct 13, 2008 3:05 pm UTC

I think probably the best way to get rid of modern DRM schemes is to think about a real solution to the root problems.

1) We have scare labour for Content Creation.
2) We have an economic system based on scarcity.
3) We have recently come to replicate perfectly and nearly-costlessly any Content
3.a) Therefore, Content, once Created, is not scarce.

Things like iTunes DRM (yes, I get it, some iTunes songs don't have DRM) attempt to address point 3 by eliminating the ability to make decent replicas.

Another alternative is to just say "fuck it", disallow all DRM, and everything's available for free. You'll note that not even Stardock really does that, because you still need your CD key to get patches, etc.. This one comes in two flavours: still illegal, but no technical measures prevent copyright violations; and legalized, removing all copyright. There are some who would argue [weasel words ;)] in favour of the latter, arguing that ultimately you can still get a sustainable business this way, and I bet in some cases they are right. But I have a hard time believing that there will be no consequence to this that I would find undesirable. The former leaves a gaping unsolved problem.

Another is the Zune model: accept that all content can be accessed, but move the scarcity away from replication of Content over to the amount of time said Content (and its replicas) can be accessed, and sell that. It's still DRM, and an artificial limitation, but you're not being sold any expectation of permanence.

Another is to just coast along and let the current system stabilize where some things are DRM'd, some not, and the magical fairy hand of the free market will sort out which things "should" have DRM and which things "should not".

Another is to try to improve DRM so that: a) people know exactly the consequences of what they're buying and the limitations they are buying into, and b) it never, ever becomes a pain in the ass for a legitimate user. And then fuck the pirates, because they have no right to choose the economic system under which Content is distributed other than to just not buy and not enjoy.

Then there's the concert/theatre model, where generally Content is not actually distributed to users at all, and the only way to come see it is at a venue where you can't really get a good recording (especially without getting caught).

Or you put product placements or other practically-unremovable advertising within your song or movie and get paid primarily by sponsors, because original content containing your product can still be a scarce resource in an economy of endless replication. Obviously, that works out differently for different forms of media.

And last but not least (of the things that I can think of in the morning), remove point 2) and push the Canada model to its logical socialist limits, where you get the government to levy a tax on items required for Content replication, and use that money to pay Content providers according to some scheme. Perhaps the scheme could be set up to simulate the free market in some manner -- if it were adopted we could probably make free & easy official download sites that would make it fairly clear what media is getting the most downloads, although then there would need to be some protection against gaming the system. Honestly, I kind of like this one best because it sidesteps a lot of BS and it lays the remaining technical problems (eg. allocation) on the same people who had a problem to begin with: record companies, movie studios, etc. I'm sure it would be unpopular in many circles, though.

embolalia
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2008 2:33 am UTC

Re: Steal This Comic

Postby embolalia » Mon Oct 13, 2008 3:09 pm UTC

WeightedCompanionCube wrote:
Magus2914 wrote:If you think that it's legal to burn iTunes music to CD just because it lets you, then you're saddly mistaken.

Is it illegal? You bet your ass it is. Is it immoral? Well, you can figure that out on your own.


It is unquestionably LEGAL.

The DMCA is concerned with circumventing copy protection measures. If the DRM will authorize you to burn an unprotected copy, there's no circumvention involved.

The RIAA once made, and quickly had to retract, a statement along the lines of "ripping CDs is illegal". They meant to say that "Circumventing measuses on copy-protected CDs in order to rip them is illegal"


Don't you love loopholes? I got my Linux box working again over the summer, and I wanted to have my iTunes stuff on it. So I burned it all. Four CDs, plus separate ones for three whole albums I'd bought. It took forever, but since I haven't hit my quota for computers, and the license allows for disk burning, I haven't broken the law. Except for installing CSS decryption.
But I bought it, so it's mine. Property, according to Merriam Webster, is the exclusive right to possess, enjoy, and dispose of a thing. I have the right to enjoy it wherever I wish. If that happens to be on a Linux computer, that's fine. Same with Windows, OSX, Unix, or whatever. You wouldn't tell me that I could drive my car on my driveway, but not on my lawn, would you? (Well, yes. Some towns do have ordinances against that. But you can see how ridiculous it is)

I stopped buying individual songs from iTunes a long time ago. If you can find it (in other words, if it isn't by the Beatles, Led Zeppelin, or any other small unknown artist like that), you end up spending a buck that the artist might get lucky to see a penny of. Or, you can download it illegally, and end up loving the artist who you never would have even listened too otherwise. Maybe you'll even go back to iTunes and buy an album. I have no moral issue with downloading free music.
I'm going to stop now, before I go into the whole infinite/finite goods issue.

EDIT: Just thought I'd throw this in. Enforcement of DRM by any US State could be in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment:
No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.

The DMCA abridges my right to property. So there.

Doug52392
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 9:34 pm UTC
Location: MA

Re: "Steal This Comic" Discussion

Postby Doug52392 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 3:25 pm UTC

My sister (whose obsessed with music) bought tons of DRM encrypted files from Wal*Mart's music service. Several weeks ago, her MP3 player somehow corrupted the DRM file, so none of her music coudl play. So I, being the computer person, had to fix it.

So it was by pure chance that her MP3 player failed, and I was reading through Wal*Mart's music license agreement and FAQs and noticed they were in the middle of editing it. It said something like "We are shutting down our DRM services. To use your DRM encrypted files, you must burn all your music to CDs.". So I did.

Okay, so if my sister's MP3 player didn't stop working (due to DRM), I would have never knew the servers were going down, so all that music would have been gone! (I would have just redownloaded all of the music she already paid for from BitTorrent anyway, and be deemed a "CRIMINAL" by the recording industry but still).

(Had to reformat the MP3 player and put all the music back on, somehow the entire filesystem was corrupted)


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