0519: "11th Grade"

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BlueNight
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby BlueNight » Sun Dec 21, 2008 5:43 am UTC

foodeater184 wrote:I would have failed out of a sudbury school, had I gone to one. I never would have started anything :(


I failed out of a Montessori preschool. As a person with Asperger's, my non-social tendencies and need for structured teacher-student learning were frowned upon.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby BlueNight » Sun Dec 21, 2008 5:49 am UTC

Benson wrote:Seems Python is a lot more popular these days, but AFAICS both Python and LISP are thoroughly designed high-level languages, and I think everyone ought to learn one of them (de gustibus non est disputandum!), but some exposure to assembly, substantial experience in C, and dabbling in several scripting languages, is also valuable for those considering any computer-related career.


Absolutely! The two things I learned in high school computer classes that I have actually used in my job as a reprographer: a bit-level understanding of image files, and a thorough understanding of MS-DOS commands (and batch files). Neither of which I learned in the programming portions of those classes.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby BlueNight » Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:17 am UTC

Jack21222 wrote:You also won't run into nonsense like having a math question marked wrong because you used a correct method more advanced than what you're learning, something that happened to me several times.


Oh yes. I remember "vocabulary" lessons. Take these five words, in exactly the forms they are presented, and put each of them in seperate sentences that do not include any of the other vocabulary words, but which each relate in some way to the meanings of the words.

Of course, they were never this precise with their instructions, and so they only got one sentence from me. I never figured out why they weren't happy with it; isn't it easier to grade "The refugees were aghast at the scarcity of critical supplies" than five other sentences?
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby retro22 » Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:23 am UTC

Yes, i feel it is meant as a school shooting reference...but yes, i do enjoy the discussion of school systems.../sarcasm...carry on ^_^

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby BlueNight » Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:30 am UTC

I just realized this is the Reader's Digest Consdensed Book form of the ENTIRE Harry Potter series.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Emmz » Sun Dec 21, 2008 7:25 am UTC

I also felt that the alt-text was maybe a school shooting reference--or if not a school violence reference, then at least a nod to the concept that "reaching out and encouraging human connection is all-around good, and also probably prevents people from committing violent and anti-social acts either in school or later in life."

As another former Strange Kid in Homeroom, I'd also say that we're pretty interesting folk :)

Honestly I think the comic had more to do with Randall's specific high school experience--and I'd bet that if you asked him if parts of high school contributed to his general knowledge, interpersonal abilities, or other such things, he'd probably say yes. Not everything in education is required to be immediately applicable to whatever your job ends up being (and most people will have more than one in the course of their lives!). My college's bookstore puts this quote on its bags: "Education is an end in itself." (Or something along those lines, anyway.)

While the U.S. school system suffers from major flaws in design, execution, and performance--and has suffered even worse under No Child Left Behind--I don't believe the point is to throw it all away and encourage all students to only pursue things they think will be relevant to their future careers. Defining oneself by the job one holds is a fundamental mistake which I think too many people make--there is so much more to being a vibrant and complex human being than whatever paid work one performs. Often enough, the basic education offered by a standard K-12 system will at least aid somewhat in helping people have a basic foundation to build on later, for career, community functions, home life, family and relationships, and so many other things. (I'm not suggesting that it's a stellar beginning for those things--often enough it is wearying and frustrating--but variety of exposure is, in my book, at least better than a dogged focus on only those things relevant to job interests without attention paid to other aspects of the human experience.)

.....In short: just get done with high school and come to college, it's way more awesome. :D The work is harder but it's never busywork, and you learn just so freaking much and build relationships with truly interesting people (even professors*!).


*I go to a smaller college; YMMV if you go to a giant university.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby limerick » Sun Dec 21, 2008 7:30 am UTC

Oh geez, 11th grade. I'm suffering that bit of torture right now.

Oh, who am I kidding? It's not that bad at all.

I suppose I won't be able to have this graph apply to my life until after I find my life's purpose (Just replace the last column with whatever is relevant), though I suppose Randall's works perfectly for my boyfriend, who looks at school as a pointless exercise until he can go to college and just program.

I think the scroll-over text is the most relevant to me. Randall, get out of my life. <3
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Your.Master » Sun Dec 21, 2008 8:22 am UTC

In my case it was a weekend of messing around with C in grade 10 (I made an ASCII Pac-man program...still runs just fine on Vista :)). Technically that was homework, but I think I could have done a much lesser project in-class and still got perfect marks.

I'm absolutely certain I had nowhere near 400 hours of homework (assuming 900 hours of class is about what I had...I really don't remember how many days of school I had in a year -- 150 days @ 6 hours / day seems low to me, actually, but uncharacteristically I don't feel like figuring it out). I normally completed homework at lunches (we had alternating daily schedules, so one set of classes was one day and another set the next), with extremely rare exceptions, so it was no more than ~1/6 of my class time; and most lunches, honestly, I did nothing but read or, rarely, socialise. It could be that I'm just hyper-brilliant, or it could be that my school was just way lighter on homework and more generous with in-class work-time. Or both. Or maybe I'm SUPER-hyper-brilliant and my school was heavier on homework than elsewhere :).

Edit: with that said, I swear: my high school education was no more and no less bullshit, on average, than my University education (top-tier University, doing Engineering Physics). Some things were bullshit, some teachers were bullshit, and that really didn't change. What changed was the narrowness of my courses (far more math & science, far less social studies), which was neither great nor terrible for me. I grew up in a rural area and went to University in a giant city. Some of the things you call high school subjects make me SO jealous. My options in high school were called: Grade X Math, Grade X Science, Grade X English, Grade X French, Grade X Phys Ed., Grade X Music, Grade X History, Grade X Drama, Grade X Art, Grade X Computers (one-time only this was offered on the exact years I went through school, and apparently in large part because I and one of my friends were that age...small town, that could actually be arranged for one of the kids who actually intended to go out into the world), Grade X Geography, Grade X Shop & Tech, and Apprenticeship (aka slave labour manning the cash register for a local merchant, counts as 4 courses). Choose 8 per year. There was also accounting for two years, and girls-only could do dance for a year, there was one year of Economics and a few extra math, science, and history courses for what you might call "grade 13" in your foolish mortal 12-grade school system.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby mrbaggins » Sun Dec 21, 2008 9:49 am UTC

School in oz is typically a 9-330 affair, which is 6.5 hours.

Usually get 1-1.5 hours off for recess/lunch and the like, so say 5 hours a day class.
There's 200 official term days a year, which are cut back by special things.
3 teacher development days
~2 public holidays
~1 strike day
and a kid usually takes a couple of sick days so call it 190 days a year. That's 950 hours per year supposedly learning stuff. 900 is actually very close.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Ferahgo » Sun Dec 21, 2008 1:02 pm UTC

Hmm... I didn't catch the alt-text-as-school-shooting-reference thing. I dunno, maybe the creepy kid in homeroom sometimes just has something interesting to say? You never know. :D

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Kitsusyn » Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:01 pm UTC

Boy I sure am glad Randall is here to tell me 11th grade is the most useless grade in highschool, after all even though most of the people here graduated we STILL couldn't have come to that extremely obvious conclusion! Thanks Randall, for bringing something in the center of obviousness to the forefront center of obviousness! You are a COMEDIC GENIUS. ¬_¬
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby fiyarburst » Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:31 pm UTC

Kitsusyn wrote:Boy I sure am glad Randall is here to tell me 11th grade is the most useless grade in highschool, after all even though most of the people here graduated we STILL couldn't have come to that extremely obvious conclusion! Thanks Randall, for bringing something in the center of obviousness to the forefront center of obviousness! You are a COMEDIC GENIUS. ¬_¬


Er, I know comedic is a word and all but think the phrase is "comic genius".

Of course, the bigger waste of time for me was the Native American unit in every year of history (er, "Social Studies") from K-7. And then 8th was early US History.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Kitsusyn » Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:34 pm UTC

fiyarburst wrote:Er, I know comedic is a word and all but think the phrase is "comic genius".


Interchangeable and highly exchangeable, buttfuck. ¬_¬
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Antibogotes » Sun Dec 21, 2008 7:30 pm UTC

I *was* the strange kid. Still am, still talking to anybody who expresses the slightest interest. I finished all the math available in my school in 10th grade, so 11th turned out to be even more of a waste. My younger brother took note of my experience, and skipped 11th grade.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby NuclearDog » Sun Dec 21, 2008 8:43 pm UTC

As someone who finally got fed up with school and dropped out, I sure am getting a kick out of this discussion.

All in all I didn't have an exceptionally bad experience at high school (daily death threats in math class, teacher out for my blood, etc. etc.). In the end I just couldn't drag myself out of bed every morning at 6AM to go sit in a place that made me miserable so that I could spend weeks on concepts that took me a day. And apparently the administration didn't think I was 'appropriate' for corrospondance and I lacked the French marks to ever get into the advanced program (IB).

So, instead I dropped out and got a better job (having significantly increased availability helps with that) and am now immensely happier. For now.

But back on topic, I had my first computer when I was 2 (loaded up with learning games - Reader Rabbit, Math Rabbit, Doom...) Got my first book on programming(QBasic) when I was about 7. From that point I went: QBasic->Visual Basic->Visual C++->PHP/C#/Javascript/Java. Most of the time spent learning those languages was during 'sick' days from school. I'd spend them sleeping, then programming and watching documentaries on Discovery/The History Channel. Then staying up all night programming leading me to be too tired to get up the next day and still being 'sick' - a perpetual cycle. A wonderful cycle. ^_^

I was 'sick' for all but about a month of 7th grade which is when I discovered Linux. Spent the remainder of that year teaching myself an ass-ton of *nix stuff, which, over the years on my 'sick' days/weeks/months lead to me moving to BSD and also learning a ton about every aspect of computers I could.

Now I periodically go out before a shift at my 'real' job to fix people's computers for $50/hr. The near-comprehensive understanding of computers I gained during my sick time allows me to more fully understand problems - which is the first step to fixing them :)

(Ironically enough, "11th Grade", as this strip is titled, was actually the one and only year of high school I made honour roll. Met my girlfriend that year and started showing up to school more to see her. Still did no work but merely showing up was enough to grok things and do better on tests.)

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Tenth Speed Writer » Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:22 pm UTC

I would, for the third time this month, like to ask Mr. Munroe to kindly stop stalking me.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby PandasOnProzak » Sun Dec 21, 2008 11:29 pm UTC

this comic, along with many others, keep pushing me to learn to program! What would be a good topic to start with? I am in 9th grade and have a good mathematical background (calc and some linear algebra), i have been meaning to l2usecomputers beyond what i need for gaming but have no idea where to start, halp please :|
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby dagw » Mon Dec 22, 2008 12:01 am UTC

PandasOnProzak wrote:this comic, along with many others, keep pushing me to learn to program! What would be a good topic to start with? I am in 9th grade and have a good mathematical background (calc and some linear algebra)

If you like the math then http://projecteuler.net/ might be a good place to start. It's basically a list of 200 math programming problems ranging from trivial to mind numbingly hard. Pick a programming language (I recommend python), learn enough to be able to write loops and if-else statements and try to solve the first couple of problems. By working through those problems you'll get really good at thinking about and solving problems with a programming approach (and you'll learn some neat math along the way). One you have the core of thinking in programming down, learning the other stuff like GUIs, web programming, databases, games or whatever becomes a lot easier.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby PandasOnProzak » Mon Dec 22, 2008 1:20 am UTC

that place looks cool, i looked at the first couple problems and they look interesting but i have no idea how python works, or coding at all for that matter, care to link me a site that teaches dummies like me?
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby suzi » Mon Dec 22, 2008 3:40 am UTC

I personally find structure and incentives MUCH more motivating than free-form education, but I do also recognize that as someone who was homeschooled until 9th grade (though note: my mother did give me a daily curriculum and assessment), the structure and hierarchy of high school was refreshing and invigorating. Something I'm sure it ISN'T for the majority of people who have lived through it from preschool.

Some people are most creative when let loose; others are inspired by constraints, and I find myself to be very, very much the second type.

Though I have friends who fit this comic FRIGHTENINGLY well. (it almost takes away their unique special snowflakeness :/)

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Flesh_Of_The_Fallen_Angel » Mon Dec 22, 2008 9:05 am UTC

Free form working is defiantly my style of learning. In primary school, we had the best principal/teacher. He seriously was. Mr Utton, if your out there reading this, I hope I spelt your name right! :mrgreen: Anyway, he gave all the senior students learning "contracts". So what they were, were just contracts saying that we would do this work today, in any order we want and however we want. Since the school was realy small (so small that at the end of the year there was only 13 students who actually turned up for school) that it closed down. All I can say is that it was unbelievably great. I have experienced nothing like it since then and probably never will again! :( The thing is, I have never learnt anything easier than with that system! The thing is, with anything that I had trouble with, I could take my time with rather than being rushed. With anything that I knew off by heart/could do realy easily, I would just do and not be held up by people who had trouble with it. It worked perfectly. Then came high-school. I hate high-school. I haven't learnt anything useful at high-school . . . 'Cept maybe a couple useful things about how to beat the system. I figured out that if I only took my P.E. uniform every second (or third when there was swimming) time I had P.E. then I did the minimal amount of P.E. without the teacher even noticing! Woo me!

I think a lot of people on xkcd are the strange kid in home-room. 'Cept in New Zealand we call it form class.

The funny thing is, I talk to the other strange kid in home-room. We hang out in a little hallway by A block, which we called the tunnel of dodgyness because everything is laced with sexual innuendo. ("I like doom" "Yeah, I just love blasting off my rocket launcher")

Side note: If anyone from Stratford high school is on xkcd, please talk to me! You just know that awesomeness will ensue! :twisted: . . . Just imagine the possibilities . . .

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby crab » Mon Dec 22, 2008 10:34 am UTC

Does nobody else wonder who exactly this Perl is and how long he messed with her for?

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Delass » Mon Dec 22, 2008 9:42 pm UTC

fiyarburst wrote:Of course, the bigger waste of time for me was the Native American unit in every year of history (er, "Social Studies") from K-7. And then 8th was early US History.

Oh my god, I actually forgot about that, and you reminded me. Thanks. :p

Seriously, why is that? That was about 900 hours (1-5, maybe K too), for me of the same, exact, curriculum.

Oddly, my 6th grade history class was the only thing that wasnt a repetition of a previous year, being ancient history (greeks, chinese, mesopotamia, etc).

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby sableye22 » Mon Dec 22, 2008 9:54 pm UTC

6453893 wrote:The most useful thing in high school was all the reading I did instead of paying attention in class.


That and all the homework you did for other classes while not paying attention. Sometimes I finish my Algebra homework while my teacher is teaching the lesson it's based on (but I pretend to pay attention, because I don't want to make her feel useless :( ).
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Flesh_Of_The_Fallen_Angel » Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:23 pm UTC

sableye22 wrote:
6453893 wrote:The most useful thing in high school was all the reading I did instead of paying attention in class.


That and all the homework you did for other classes while not paying attention. Sometimes I finish my Algebra homework while my teacher is teaching the lesson it's based on (but I pretend to pay attention, because I don't want to make her feel useless :( ).

Teachers have feelings? How strange. :?

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby sableye22 » Mon Dec 22, 2008 11:47 pm UTC

Flesh_Of_The_Fallen_Angel wrote:
sableye22 wrote:
6453893 wrote:The most useful thing in high school was all the reading I did instead of paying attention in class.


That and all the homework you did for other classes while not paying attention. Sometimes I finish my Algebra homework while my teacher is teaching the lesson it's based on (but I pretend to pay attention, because I don't want to make her feel useless :( ).

Teachers have feelings? How strange. :?


yeah...it's kind of like: http://xkcd.com/175/
You don't have to spend, you just have to pretend.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Iori_Yagami » Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:59 am UTC

Big 'disagree' here.
Randy's school gets an fat red "F" for being lame.
This whole thing is so extremely unnerdy... Who complains about school the most? Those who still (and probably never) didn't get to learn properly. For me, school was a breeze (if you learnt years before and before, never dropping the flag, and are used to it).
OTOH, when I studied, almost noone had or used computers at all...
Repetition is the mother of knowledge, they say...
When at work I encounter examples of white spaces in knowledge due to someone, who didn't study right at school, I am merciless. How could you not know where to put commas, not be able to differentiate between veins and arteries or confuse arachnids for insects? Back to blackboard with you!
All in all, comic illustrates how insanely specialized professions became, and "specialization is for insects". I mean, a programmer asks for economic formulas to write software (because he is "not an economist" despite simple math with geometric progression), makes errors in form labels ("I need a spellchecker!"). Wtf is that??? Am I the only one who does all of this alone? All the steps of SDLC? :?:
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Jack21222 » Tue Dec 23, 2008 2:13 pm UTC

Iori_Yagami wrote:Repetition is the mother of knowledge


Big "disagree" here.

Repetition is the mother of memorization. A deep understanding is the key to knowledge. It's the difference between knowing the name of something and actually knowing something.

Sure, there is some measure of repetition in studying, and some repetition on the road to learning something, but to repeat the same thing year after year, class after class, isn't the best route to knowledge. High school isn't quite as bad at that as elementary and middle school, but it's evident at all levels.

I had a 3rd grade teacher that took your philosophy to extremes. She's the one that caused me to realize homework is pointless. For example, in math, we were learning something pretty basic. I hadn't just memorized it; I knew it cold. Front, back, sideways, I had this subject nailed. This teacher would give out somewhere around 50-60 math problems for homework per night, on the stuff that was trivial.

It's more of the same in high school. Calculus for example... the rule for a derivative is simple enough. The n(a)^(n-1) rule is a nice easy mechanical trick to remember. It doesn't teach you anything about WHY that rule is the case (hint: binomial theorem), and once you know what the mechanical rule is, you don't need to harp on it for a week straight, giving 30 problems per night using n(a)^(n-1).

Sorry if I'm focusing on math, it was my focus in school. Same thing with grammar in English, though. Once you know what a gerund phrase is and can identify it, that should be it.

Don't even get me started on history, with the memorizing of dates and names, instead of digging into the reasons why certain things happened...
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Aspergia » Wed Dec 24, 2008 3:04 am UTC

Iori_Yagami wrote:When at work I encounter examples of white spaces in knowledge due to someone, who didn't study right at school, I am merciless. How could you not know where to put commas, not be able to differentiate between veins and arteries or confuse arachnids for insects? Back to blackboard with you!


But how do you tell what's due to someone who "didn't study right", what's simply beyond the individual's ability, and what they were never taught in the first place? We never covered veins, arachnids OR gerunds at school. That doesn't make me a bad student, it just makes me a graduate of a school with a curriculum that doesn't cover arachnids, the circulatory system, or the finer points of English grammar.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Iori_Yagami » Wed Dec 24, 2008 7:17 am UTC

Sorry, I forgot that you are 'mericans, whose freedom sometimes is too much for their own good. I mean, if a school didn't give students the very basic, ministry of education endorsed curriculum, they would be friggin' suspended because they don't do their job! :roll:
And, of course, understanding is more important than 'just knowing'. Too bad, without doing repeats, you'll forget it quickly. Have you ever noticed how hard it is to start new year after ~3 month of summer vacation? :(
OTOH, I don't quite remember doing 50 similar tasks as a homework. This is indeed a screwed up approach. It was usually 4-5, with increasing difficulty, plus a hard bonus for the ones who feel bored by standard stuff. Yeah, our school was cool in that respect. But really, as our teacher once said: "How can we speak about language styles and advanced tenses, if you still forget not to put 'to' particle after modal 'must'? :mrgreen:
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby tazeat » Wed Dec 24, 2008 9:39 am UTC

LOL I LOVE THIS COMIC XD

Too bad I think PERL was like 10th grade, XHTML Strict + php was 11th :), too bad I'm still in college working warehouse monkey jobs.. Someday it will advance my career, I'm soo sick of college and life in general :(

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Cpt.DaveyJones » Sat Dec 27, 2008 2:35 am UTC

halberdier25 wrote:I agree wholly with the entire comic.


I don't. Homework builds character* ; )


*I guess :S

EDIT: @ Iori_Yagami: Yes, we must to go to school in order to learn how to form correct english phrases.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby OmegaLord » Sat Dec 27, 2008 4:24 am UTC

tazeat wrote:¡This cheese is burning me! I LOVE THIS COMIC XD


I am... sorry for you. Why, pray tell, is the cheese connected to the comic?
Note: I do know what's going on.
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby tricky77puzzle » Sat Dec 27, 2008 7:59 pm UTC

Cpt.DaveyJones wrote:I don't. Homework builds character ; )


Homework only builds character if it helps you learn things. If it's just work for the purpose of keeping you busy, then it's a detriment to your stamina.

That being said, I don't agree wholly either. The 900 hours of classes should definitely be lower. Even homework is more useful.

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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby Cpt.DaveyJones » Mon Dec 29, 2008 4:10 am UTC

tricky77puzzle wrote:
Cpt.DaveyJones wrote:I don't. Homework builds character ; )


Homework only builds character if it helps you learn things. If it's just work for the purpose of keeping you busy, then it's a detriment to your stamina.

That being said, I don't agree wholly either. The 900 hours of classes should definitely be lower. Even homework is more useful.


Sigh, another one of those :roll: . Even Randall quotes from C&H!
By the way, what you learn is most probably not the important thing in school*. It is more the will to 'shut up' and do what you're told to that gets you good marks.
The usefulness is not a practical result, more a subtle result that'll allow you to recieve better results somewhere else.
A good fellow of mine read a book that he's quoting often these days. One of the things he already told me twice is the following story:

A young lad was really good at school, studied at Oxford University and then had an interview for a job he was not qualified for ( he studied something different ).
The interview was something like this:
"So, we're really interested in you for this position"
"But I studied something totaly different!"
"Umm, you studied at Oxford, didn't you?"
"Indeed, I did"
"That qualifies you for the job."

Lateron he said that, at this point, he understood that when you finished studying you haven't finished studying by far.

*For your future employer. For us it isn't at all, but that has allready been stated in so many posts before.

Well, sleep tight lads. Time to go to bed now : )

jwwells
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby jwwells » Fri Jan 02, 2009 7:12 am UTC

A useless class is one that is consistently inane. This is independent of the general subject; math, science, history, and finance can all be taught in a shallow, empty way. A good class is one that expands a student's ability to think in some way. Given that this is usually at least a little uncomfortable, I think I'll stick to the "base curriculum with electives" model, thank you very much.

I feel like one of the old guard protesting the removal of Latin from classrooms when I complain about this emphasis on Useful Knowledge, but do we really need to force teenagers to say "At age thirteen, I want to be a programmer, and I'm going to take programming classes and nothing else!" Because, when it comes down to it, that's what we'd end up with. It'd practically be a form of child labor, earlier and earlier training being emphasized in order to be competitive.

In college, I was grateful for the humanities requirement; it meant that I could actually learn about literature, philosophy, and so on without a grad school admissions committee sneering at these thoroughly useless classes. They made me very happy, even if they did little to increase my worth as a corporate or academic pawn.

dhl262
Posts: 13
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby dhl262 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 7:59 am UTC

This is so true. School has given me a good background, but it has in no way helped me with a career.

ETHANR26
Posts: 6
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby ETHANR26 » Sat Feb 07, 2009 12:49 am UTC

Vertana wrote:I don't know about a Sudbury school, half my time in high school was finishing work in 10 minutes and using the next 45 minutes in each class figuring out how to beat the security and all of the "features" that the school employed. Now? Program for a hobby, SysAdmin for a job. Thank you authoritarian style schooling for giving me the motivation to beat you at your own game and giving me the skills to carry on a career I'll enjoy for the rest of my life!



Just FYI if anyone has crappy computers in their school with no flash player, you can just install firefox into your network drive and paste the npswf32.dll in the plugins directory. Its also funny when you drag folders from every network drive into other places because they cannot see who moved things. i never did this, but someone has done it and does it continuously to this day at my school.

scarletmanuka
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Location: Perth, Western Australia

Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby scarletmanuka » Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:01 am UTC

wisty wrote:What about things that are not part of school? I did martial arts, scouts, musicals, volunteered time with community groups, read books, messed around with friends etc; all out of school time. They were pretty important to my "Human Developmental Potential". None of that was really "school". I guess that would be a problem for less privileged kids (but a library card is free, marital arts is a few bucks a week, messing around with friends is pretty cheap ...)

Opinions may vary, but I don't think it's really appropriate for those activities to be promoted by the educational system. Also makes one wonder what exactly "messing around with friends" entails... ;)

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dennisw
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Re: "11th Grade" Discussion

Postby dennisw » Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:50 am UTC

scarletmanuka wrote:
wisty wrote:What about things that are not part of school? I did martial arts, scouts, musicals, volunteered time with community groups, read books, messed around with friends etc; all out of school time. They were pretty important to my "Human Developmental Potential". None of that was really "school". I guess that would be a problem for less privileged kids (but a library card is free, marital arts is a few bucks a week, messing around with friends is pretty cheap ...)

Opinions may vary, but I don't think it's really appropriate for those activities to be promoted by the educational system. Also makes one wonder what exactly "messing around with friends" entails... ;)

I don't know, once upon a time some people would go to college to get an MRS degree... :lol:
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