0538: "Security"

This forum is for the individual discussion thread that goes with each new comic.

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

User avatar
GuitarFreak
Posts: 382
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 7:30 am UTC
Location: State College PA
Contact:

0538: "Security"

Postby GuitarFreak » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:02 am UTC

Image
Alt text: Actual actual reality: nobody cares about his secrets. (Also, I would be hard-pressed to find that wrench for $5.

I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.
Image
Cooler than a bose-einstein condensate
Bakemaster wrote:I went to high school with a girl whose middle name was Nguyen and whose last name was Huynh. It was a win-win situation.

HenryGifford
Posts: 152
Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2008 2:01 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby HenryGifford » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:03 am UTC

I bet it's plastic.

User avatar
TheHand
Posts: 178
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 8:03 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby TheHand » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:04 am UTC

Yeah man, they'll get you on those tools...

User avatar
suso
Posts: 199
Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2007 6:23 pm UTC
Location: Sky Grund
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby suso » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:08 am UTC

SO SO TRUE! I'm big on security. But sometimes I get tired of people talking about disk encryption. Most people who care about it aren't stupid enough or brave enough to resist getting their arm ripped off and will give into.

I think what it really comes down to is does the person who owns the laptop think their information is more valuable than their life. Not the government saying "Is this information important enough to us?"
Imagine theres no signatures....

Carnildo
Posts: 2023
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 8:43 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Carnildo » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:11 am UTC

You don't use a wrench, you use a rubber hose!

Storm
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2008 4:37 am UTC
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Storm » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:12 am UTC

GuitarFreak wrote:I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.
Wow I was very close to creating the topic today, I figured that's exactly what my comment would be. I'll stick to just having stuff that's only of mild importance and illegality.
Three Quotes:
Spoiler:
"DON'T PANIC" - Douglas Adams
"All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost"- J.R.R. Tolkien
"This life is more than just a read through"- Red Hot Chili Peppers

Geogriffith
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2008 6:21 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Geogriffith » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:14 am UTC

I remember reading a Slashdot post about getting a laptop past border security without the Feds having access to your files. There were a great number of suggestions about using Truecrypt, locking all your data into an unhackable block, changing the boot partition, etc. Oddly enough, nobody suggested moving all your sensitive data to an ipod. You hand the laptop to the feds, they boot up windows and find a bunch of family photos. Yawn. They look at your ipod, see a bunch of music. Yawn. You get waved through and ALL YOUR PRECIOUS SECRETS ARE SAFE.

wideeight
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:08 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby wideeight » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:15 am UTC

I don't even have a password on my laptop. But I've spent about $3500 on tools in the last 8 months. Tools pay the bills though so I guess they're worth it...

User avatar
roc314
Is dead, and you have killed him
Posts: 1356
Joined: Thu Jul 24, 2008 12:48 am UTC
Location: A bunker, here behind my wall
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby roc314 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:16 am UTC

I approve of this comic.

(I would still go with the cluster over the wrench. After you are done beating him over the head with various towers from the cluster, you can use it for something else useful. A five dollar wrench? Not so much.)
Hippo: roc is the good little communist that lurks in us all
Richard Stallman: Geeks like to think that they can ignore politics, you can leave politics alone, but politics won't leave you alone.
suffer-cait: roc's a pretty cool dude

User avatar
dennisw
Posts: 441
Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 9:09 am UTC
Location: Appearing pro se AND pro bono!
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby dennisw » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:20 am UTC

GuitarFreak wrote:I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.


Harbor Freight
Try the Printifier for xkcd. You can now scale the comic between 50 and 150%.

I find these very useful: Common Errors in English Usage (web site) and Eats, Shoots & Leaves (book). You may, too.

e pluribus unum
Unleash unlicensed ungulates!

Phaden
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 4:37 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Phaden » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:21 am UTC

I know what I would do with a $5 wrench

*mumble, mumble senator paylen, stupid, mumble, russia, mumble*

Aquila
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2008 1:25 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Aquila » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:25 am UTC

The point (at least for me) is just discouragement. It's the same reason you lock your car. Anybody with a good size rock could still get in and have their way with it. But if your car is locked and the one next to it isn't, guess which one is now minus a stereo. :-)

User avatar
Verad
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:34 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Verad » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:26 am UTC

GuitarFreak wrote:(Also, I would be hard-pressed to find that wrench for $5.


I blame Greenspan.

kenj0418
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:21 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby kenj0418 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:29 am UTC

How about this:

Layer 1: Encrypted hard drive containing, normal, useless stuff.
(Give them this password when they break out the $5 wrenches)

Layer 2: Hidden encrypted volume contained on hard drive -- containing freaky porn and documentation of questionable financial dealings.
(Give them this password when they break out the $20 needle-nose pliers)

Layer 3: Evil world domination plans - encrypted and steganoraphically hidden with the freaky porn.
(Your evil minions should have freed you by now -- if not you can only hope that your captors are captivated by the porn until you can make your escape.)

egoebelbecker
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:28 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby egoebelbecker » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:30 am UTC

$3.50 Monkey Wrench:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... 0292021392

Of course, it's Ebay so you may never actually get it.

toysbfun
Posts: 171
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:14 am UTC
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby toysbfun » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:36 am UTC

Crypto's like vaccination. It doesn't really work as well when only a handful of people use it. Raise your hands if you use PGP on a regular basis. Now look at all the people that didn't raise their hands. You might as well be holding up a sign that says, "Look at me! I've got something to hide!" as Carnivore sifts through the email.

Geogriffith wrote:I remember reading a Slashdot post about getting a laptop past border security without the Feds having access to your files. There were a great number of suggestions about using Truecrypt, locking all your data into an unhackable block, changing the boot partition, etc. Oddly enough, nobody suggested moving all your sensitive data to an ipod. You hand the laptop to the feds, they boot up windows and find a bunch of family photos. Yawn. They look at your ipod, see a bunch of music. Yawn. You get waved through and ALL YOUR PRECIOUS SECRETS ARE SAFE.

I remember reading a BoingBoing post where border security just confiscates the iPod and laptop. Why? Because the border security guard wants a free laptop and iPod. Your precious secrets are deleted to make room for his music.

Additives
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:14 pm UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Additives » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:39 am UTC

How to get a wrentch for less than $5:

Buy a cheep screwdriver. you gan get them for about a dollar. Intimidate the storeclerk into handing over a wrench, and then tip him $4 to forget your face.
Visit my site and tell me what you think: Additives

User avatar
vodka.cobra
Posts: 371
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2008 6:50 pm UTC
Location: Florida
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby vodka.cobra » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:49 am UTC

Damn you, Randall! Always breaking my self-constructed delusions!
If the above comment has anything to do with hacking or cryptography, note that I work for a PHP security company and might know what I'm talking about.

User avatar
Brooklynxman
Because I'm Awesome
Posts: 609
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 4:27 pm UTC
Location: Here
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Brooklynxman » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:51 am UTC

I agree with the hide it all in freaky porn method. Because all the FBI/NSA need is someone leaking to the press that they were using their servers to look at freaky porn.
We figure out what all this means, then do something large and violent

The thing about changing the world...once you do it the world's all different.

I'm Angel. I beat the bad guys.

Spoiler:
Image

yoshi
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jul 04, 2007 7:01 pm UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby yoshi » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:51 am UTC

toysbfun wrote:Crypto's like vaccination. It doesn't really work as well when only a handful of people use it. Raise your hands if you use PGP on a regular basis. Now look at all the people that didn't raise their hands. You might as well be holding up a sign that says, "Look at me! I've got something to hide!" as Carnivore sifts through the email.

I remember reading a BoingBoing post where border security just confiscates the iPod and laptop. Why? Because the border security guard wants a free laptop and iPod. Your precious secrets are deleted to make room for his music.


Your quote doesn't make much sense. Encryption is used everywhere. Encryption is used for protecting data in motion (such as VPN b2b links, ssl, etc), protecting data in databases (your credit card information), or encrypting data on a mobile device (such as a laptop as in this cartoon's example). E-mail is a very minor use of encryption in today's society. The goal is simply to prevent unauthorized use of data and encryption used in the correct fashion helps achieve that.

(and yes - I use PGP or other tools to encrypt e-mail on a regular basis)
(scared that people are taking their security advice from places like boingboing)
(and this cartoon is more accurate than you know)

gormster
Posts: 233
Joined: Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:43 am UTC
Location: Sydney

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby gormster » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:53 am UTC

I got a sick 12" Chrome Vanadium steel shifter for $30 AU, so that's about 67 US cents.
Eddie Izzard wrote:And poetry! Poetry is a lot like music, only less notes and more words.

User avatar
'; DROP DATABASE;--
Posts: 3284
Joined: Thu Nov 22, 2007 9:38 am UTC
Location: Midwest Alberta, where it's STILL snowy
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby '; DROP DATABASE;-- » Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:55 am UTC

See, this guy's doin' it rong.

1) You don't store the password in your own brain! It's far too easy to extract from there.
2) The encrypted files should be hidden well enough that nobody even knows they exist, in pieces, in so many different places that even if someone discovers part of it, they'll never find it all.
3) Your laptop, when booted up by someone who doesn't know how, should boot into an ordinary Windows XP/Vista installation, with a few family photos and a few random uninteresting websites in the IE history.
4) 99% of the encrypted files should be porn.
poxic wrote:You suck. And simultaneously rock. I think you've invented a new state of being.

mail2345
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:17 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby mail2345 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:01 am UTC

To improve the various mentioned methods, claim that you're a member of a cult that worships random data. Or something like that.

phrygianhalf
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:00 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby phrygianhalf » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:04 am UTC

Why are you encrypting your hard drive with public key encryption? I would recommend against RSA for anything except for private key exchange and signing, although having a large volume encoded in something that cumbersome would definitely slow an attacker down, even if they did know the password.

toysbfun
Posts: 171
Joined: Fri Apr 13, 2007 5:14 am UTC
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby toysbfun » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:15 am UTC

yoshi wrote:
toysbfun wrote:Crypto's like vaccination. It doesn't really work as well when only a handful of people use it. Raise your hands if you use PGP on a regular basis. Now look at all the people that didn't raise their hands. You might as well be holding up a sign that says, "Look at me! I've got something to hide!" as Carnivore sifts through the email.

I remember reading a BoingBoing post where border security just confiscates the iPod and laptop. Why? Because the border security guard wants a free laptop and iPod. Your precious secrets are deleted to make room for his music.


Your quote doesn't make much sense. Encryption is used everywhere. Encryption is used for protecting data in motion (such as VPN b2b links, ssl, etc), protecting data in databases (your credit card information), or encrypting data on a mobile device (such as a laptop as in this cartoon's example). E-mail is a very minor use of encryption in today's society. The goal is simply to prevent unauthorized use of data and encryption used in the correct fashion helps achieve that.

(and yes - I use PGP or other tools to encrypt e-mail on a regular basis)
(scared that people are taking their security advice from places like boingboing)
(and this cartoon is more accurate than you know)


Corporations (and other entities classified as "persons") do use VPNs and databases, but are more likely to be subpoenaed than robbed. Most real people using computers don't encrypt their data. Heck, most people don't even backup their data regularly.

The accuracy of the cartoon was my point. They can beat up a handful of crypto nerds easily. If crypto was used by a majority of people, well, beating people up doesn't scale that way.

sje46
Posts: 4730
Joined: Wed May 14, 2008 4:41 am UTC
Location: New Hampshire

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby sje46 » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:17 am UTC

Randall, not funny.

My father was once beaten with a wrench.

Not cool, not funny, not a good comic.
General_Norris: Taking pride in your nation is taking pride in the division of humanity.
Pirate.Bondage: Let's get married. Right now.

User avatar
pyroman
Posts: 346
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 5:35 am UTC
Location: University at Buffalo
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby pyroman » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:23 am UTC

dennisw wrote:
GuitarFreak wrote:I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.


Harbor Freight


dam ninja'd

I love it when people try to do overly elaborate methods of breaking into somewhere (or doing anything for that matter). Remember you dont need to get past everything. Any security system is only as strong as its weakest link. Which is why i laugh anytime someone uses a combo lock on something as i can get those open faster than they can enter in the combo with just a soda can.

Another good one was when a friend was so confident that i couldn't get into his computer because he had a finger print reader for the password. i told him that it didnt matter and he said prove it. So i said ok, walked across the hall to my dorm grabbed a ubuntu live disk and had access to everything in the time it took for it to boot up. he was rather amazed. of course for government super computers the proper operating procedure is to enter in joshua.
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin

ThemePark
Posts: 450
Joined: Fri Jun 27, 2008 5:42 pm UTC
Location: Århus, Denmark

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby ThemePark » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:29 am UTC

Does such a mindblowing thing as a 4096 bit RSA even exist?

And Verad, I love your avatar. :D
pyroman wrote:
dennisw wrote:
GuitarFreak wrote:I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.


Harbor Freight


dam ninja'd

I love it when people try to do overly elaborate methods of breaking into somewhere (or doing anything for that matter). Remember you dont need to get past everything. Any security system is only as strong as its weakest link. Which is why i laugh anytime someone uses a combo lock on something as i can get those open faster than they can enter in the combo with just a soda can.

Another good one was when a friend was so confident that i couldn't get into his computer because he had a finger print reader for the password. i told him that it didnt matter and he said prove it. So i said ok, walked across the hall to my dorm grabbed a ubuntu live disk and had access to everything in the time it took for it to boot up. he was rather amazed. of course for government super computers the proper operating procedure is to enter in joshua.

I'm pretty sure, insurance would care whether or not you had tried to protect your valuables.
Last edited by ThemePark on Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:32 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
I have traveled from 1979 to be a member of the unofficial board Council of Elders. Phear M3

Garnett
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 10:32 pm UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Garnett » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:31 am UTC

This, by the way, is why I never use the fingerprint-scan authentication option on my laptops.

User avatar
ManaUser
Posts: 284
Joined: Mon Jun 09, 2008 9:28 pm UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby ManaUser » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:34 am UTC

toysbfun wrote:Corporations (and other entities classified as "persons") do use VPNs and databases, but are more likely to be subpoenaed than robbed. Most real people using computers don't encrypt their data. Heck, most people don't even backup their data regularly.

Actually most people do use SSL (https) fairly regularly, any time they shop or deal with their bank online. Which probably makes it the ideal encryption method for discussing your plans for world domination without tipping off the Illuminati. Since there's a whole bunch of https traffic you're not going to stand out, whereas They would notice you using GPGed email right away.

Nathanb
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:35 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Nathanb » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:39 am UTC

pyroman wrote:
dennisw wrote:
GuitarFreak wrote:I'd also like to find a $5 wrench.


Harbor Freight


dam ninja'd

I love it when people try to do overly elaborate methods of breaking into somewhere (or doing anything for that matter). Remember you dont need to get past everything. Any security system is only as strong as its weakest link. Which is why i laugh anytime someone uses a combo lock on something as i can get those open faster than they can enter in the combo with just a soda can.

Another good one was when a friend was so confident that i couldn't get into his computer because he had a finger print reader for the password. i told him that it didnt matter and he said prove it. So i said ok, walked across the hall to my dorm grabbed a ubuntu live disk and had access to everything in the time it took for it to boot up. he was rather amazed. of course for government super computers the proper operating procedure is to enter in joshua.

Thats why you set the bios to boot from hard disk first and then password protect the bios. But fingerprint scanners are ineffective as password protectors. If you really wanted to get in, just cut off the persons finger. No to mention the mythbusters proved that a simple copy of a print on paper can get passed some fingerprint scanners. Now retna scanners are a little more difficult to fool.

User avatar
pyroman
Posts: 346
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 5:35 am UTC
Location: University at Buffalo
Contact:

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby pyroman » Mon Feb 02, 2009 6:58 am UTC

Nathanb wrote:
pyroman wrote: Another good one was when a friend was so confident that i couldn't get into his computer because he had a finger print reader for the password. i told him that it didnt matter and he said prove it. So i said ok, walked across the hall to my dorm grabbed a ubuntu live disk and had access to everything in the time it took for it to boot up. he was rather amazed. of course for government super computers the proper operating procedure is to enter in joshua.

Thats why you set the bios to boot from hard disk first and then password protect the bios. But fingerprint scanners are ineffective as password protectors. If you really wanted to get in, just cut off the persons finger. No to mention the mythbusters proved that a simple copy of a print on paper can get passed some fingerprint scanners. Now retna scanners are a little more difficult to fool.


well yea there was plenty that could have been done to increase security but the point i was making is that i didn't have to go about trying to get his finger print of had it been a regular password gone around trying to crack that. all i had to do was target the weakest link. This was like having a dead bolt on the front door but leaving the back one unlocked. (oh no the cliche police are coming to get me now). Basically my point is that the average persons security is pretty useless if someone wanted to gain access to their data.
They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Benjamin Franklin

Osha
Posts: 727
Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2008 3:24 am UTC
Location: Boise, Idaho, USA

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Osha » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:41 am UTC

One time pad!
Hard drive contains the key. USB drive contains the data. (or other way around, doesn't matter)
Just to be safe there's also conventional encryption on top of the one time pad.
In a disaster scenario you start the hard-drive wipe sequence then smash the USB drive with a hammer and flush the fragments down the toilet.
I love the one time pad! Simple yet effective! <3

I need to keep working on my one time pad secure internet chat program... for when I need to send confidential data over the internet.
The great thing about a one time pad is that it's impossible to crack unless you have both the key and the data (either one by itself is just random bytes). The not so great thing is that you need to securely give someone the key beforehand if you want to communicate over an unsecured connection.

synp
Posts: 43
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:43 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby synp » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:49 am UTC

ThemePark wrote:Does such a mindblowing thing as a 4096 bit RSA even exist?


Sure it does. RSA usually involves either 1024, 2048 or 4096 bits.

1024 is probably most common, but it's equivalent to 80 bits of regular encryption, so the US government is telling everyone to move to 2048 by next year.

User avatar
screech
Posts: 200
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:20 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby screech » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:50 am UTC

You silly people. All you need to do is set your files to "Hidden". They'll never find it then!
alitheiapsis wrote:HEY NOW DON'T TALK SHIT ABOUT BRONTOSAURUSES

Osha
Posts: 727
Joined: Wed Dec 03, 2008 3:24 am UTC
Location: Boise, Idaho, USA

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Osha » Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:57 am UTC

synp wrote:
ThemePark wrote:Does such a mindblowing thing as a 4096 bit RSA even exist?


Sure it does. RSA usually involves either 1024, 2048 or 4096 bits.

1024 is probably most common, but it's equivalent to 80 bits of regular encryption, so the US government is telling everyone to move to 2048 by next year.


This probably means they can already decrypt 2048 bits.
[/conspiracy]

synp
Posts: 43
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 7:43 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby synp » Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:01 am UTC

suso wrote:SO SO TRUE! I'm big on security. But sometimes I get tired of people talking about disk encryption. Most people who care about it aren't stupid enough or brave enough to resist getting their arm ripped off and will give into.

I think what it really comes down to is does the person who owns the laptop think their information is more valuable than their life. Not the government saying "Is this information important enough to us?"


That's all interesting, but that is not what disk encryption is for. Suppose the data is so sensitive that I expect an agent (or employee) to have their arm ripped off rather than divulge the key. Why would I ever allow them to walk around with the data on a laptop, especially if they know the password?

Disk encryption solves the problems of a misplaced or stolen latptop. Nothing else. Laptops (and iPods) get stolen by purse-snatchers, pick-pockets and home burglars. They don't have access to the owner later, and they don't usually know what they've stolen, unless they can see it. If the disk is encrypted, they'll just re-format the drive and call it a day.

Even if they are foreign spies and steal the laptop from someone who they know has secret data on their laptop, they won't try to break the RSA - they will try to crack the password (there's about 20 bits of randomness in the password)

Oh, and if the $5 wrench can be used, why hit him for the password? Hit him for the information itself.

User avatar
Meng Bomin
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:28 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Meng Bomin » Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:09 am UTC

synp wrote:Oh, and if the $5 wrench can be used, why hit him for the password? Hit him for the information itself.

Password's more easily verified.

WITEBRED
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:18 am UTC

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby WITEBRED » Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:20 am UTC

actually i think you can find a wrench for 5 bucks at harbor freight

User avatar
Birdman
Posts: 208
Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2006 4:28 am UTC
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: "Security" discussion

Postby Birdman » Mon Feb 02, 2009 8:30 am UTC

sje46 wrote:Randall, not funny.

My father was once beaten with a wrench.

Not cool, not funny, not a good comic.



Get over it. Pretty much anything that can be funny can also be horrible. If you can't see a webcomic objectively then you've got bigger problems than basically all the slapstick humour in the world.


Return to “Individual XKCD Comic Threads”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: distractedSofty and 43 guests