0988: "Tradition"

This forum is for the individual discussion thread that goes with each new comic.

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

Korvis
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 4:41 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Korvis » Wed Dec 14, 2011 5:07 pm UTC

As a bona fide Boomer myself, I gotta agree with the earlier comment that this is the drivel that was forced on us as kids. AM radio. Out in the Iowa prairies we had about 4 stations you could get during the day, and two were mostly ag market reports. For our Parents, Christmas tradition was all about "what it was like for us back in the Depression, when we were happy to get a lump of coal in our stockings. It meant you would have heat for a while". I'm just grateful they didn't try too hard to RECREATE those Christmases. Instead they embraced Dean Martin and Perry Como, aluminum trees and battery-operated toys.

User avatar
Proginoskes
Posts: 313
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2011 7:07 am UTC
Location: Sitting Down

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Proginoskes » Thu Dec 15, 2011 6:56 am UTC

Korvis wrote:Instead they embraced Dean Martin and Perry Como, aluminum trees and battery-operated toys.


You mean his name isn't Perry Coma? Sunofagun ...

(In related wordplay, "narcoleptic" is an anagram of "Eric Clapton".)

User avatar
markfiend
Posts: 482
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:59 am UTC
Location: UK (Leeds)

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby markfiend » Thu Dec 15, 2011 11:00 am UTC

Nergye wrote:Noone even mentioned "Christmas Time (Don't Let The Bells End)" by The Darkness. :( Granted, this is likely to be largely confined to the UK, since that's where they're from, and I wouldn't for a moment expect to see it represented on anything like this. But it's by far the most listenable Christmas song I know, to someone who is predominantly into rock music, and the only one I have actively acquired for my music collection.

IMO The Darkness song is a fairly cynical attempt to cash in on the glam-rock success of songs like Slade's "Merry Xmas Everybody" and Wizzard's "I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day".

Having said that, I still like it :lol:
Attoc dna Sublab evol eht teews secoiv fo eht slrug
pronouns: he/him/his

darktalon
Posts: 38
Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2007 7:40 pm UTC
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby darktalon » Fri Dec 16, 2011 10:29 am UTC

It's interesting how different this looks from the equivalent graph for the UK. I'd never given much thought to the difference between British and American Christmas music, and it was perhaps a bit surprising how much there is. Though all the songs on there are familiar to us, the top ten most played in the UK in 2000-9 (according to the PRS) include four from the '70s, five from the '80s and one from the '90s. I wonder what that says about our attitudes towards Christmas.

User avatar
AvatarIII
Posts: 2098
Joined: Fri Apr 08, 2011 12:28 pm UTC
Location: W.Sussex, UK

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby AvatarIII » Fri Dec 16, 2011 11:04 am UTC

darktalon wrote:It's interesting how different this looks from the equivalent graph for the UK. I'd never given much thought to the difference between British and American Christmas music, and it was perhaps a bit surprising how much there is. Though all the songs on there are familiar to us, the top ten most played in the UK in 2000-9 (according to the PRS) include four from the '70s, five from the '80s and one from the '90s. I wonder what that says about our attitudes towards Christmas.


we're nostalgic, but we're not that nostalgic...

tankboy
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:43 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby tankboy » Fri Dec 16, 2011 1:58 pm UTC

I'm a Baby Boomer and, sure, we Boomers drive a huge market share, but I wasn't buying records in the fifties, I was a child. The traditional Christmas songs that make visiting a store at this time of year so memorable are my parents choice of music. That generation has passed and yet the music is still here. So I guess we're stuck with Traditional Christmas Music forever!

User avatar
markfiend
Posts: 482
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:59 am UTC
Location: UK (Leeds)

Re: 988: "Tradition"

Postby markfiend » Mon Dec 19, 2011 11:20 am UTC

RAGBRAIvet wrote:
HiFranc wrote:Mariah Carey - All I Want for Christmas is You

That version is a remake; "All I Want For Christmas Is You" was originally done by Vince Vance and the Valiants and was released in 1989 — before Ms. Carey ever began her recording career.

No, they're two different songs with the same name.
Attoc dna Sublab evol eht teews secoiv fo eht slrug
pronouns: he/him/his

uknowurright9
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2009 2:10 am UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby uknowurright9 » Sat Dec 24, 2011 6:57 am UTC

How come anyone thinks that we Baby Boomers actually like any of the crap that pop radio bludgeoned us with when payola-ridden AM radio was pretty much all you could listen to? This applies to all the said crap, not just Christmas music -- but the day after Thanksgiving, every store I enter bludgeons us with the Christmas-season crap all over again.


Ah, now we have hit the nail on the head here. Payola = source of all evil.

Okay, I admit that's a little extreme but you get my point.

Floorman56
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 6:17 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Floorman56 » Wed Jan 04, 2012 6:24 pm UTC

Please ... Most of those songs are from Generation Jones not baby boomers 1954 to 1965, Yea I know you guys love to lump us in with the boomers.

User avatar
gmalivuk
GNU Terry Pratchett
Posts: 25820
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There
Contact:

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby gmalivuk » Wed Jan 04, 2012 9:13 pm UTC

Who's "you guys"? The spike in birth rates known as The Baby Boom extends from the end of WWII until the mid-1960s.
Unless stated otherwise, I do not care whether a statement, by itself, constitutes a persuasive political argument. I care whether it's true.
---
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(he/him/his)

Kaiman
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:08 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Kaiman » Tue Jan 10, 2012 9:31 pm UTC

I wonder what impact the war had on the need to celebrate family and religion.


Apparently none, since only 1 of those 20 songs has anything to do with religion or the Biblical Christmas story or any similar theme (and even then, it's just a made-up tale that happens to involve baby Jesus in it).

Also note that 4 of the songs aren't actually Christmas songs at all, either in the religious or secular sense. They are songs about winter or snow that are not even remotely Christmas-specific except for the times that the radio stations choose to play them.

Jaedreth
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2012 1:28 am UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Jaedreth » Tue Feb 28, 2012 1:32 am UTC

1940's: Baby, It's Cold Outside
2012: Baby, It's Space Outside: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BR5sWq6ONws&feature=related

User avatar
Sprocket
Seymour
Posts: 5940
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 6:04 pm UTC
Location: impaled on Beck's boney hips.
Contact:

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Sprocket » Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:46 pm UTC

I really wish Randal had included the specific artist under each of these.
"She’s a free spirit, a wind-rider, she’s at one with nature, and walks with the kodama eidolons”
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Zohar wrote: Down with the hipster binary! It's a SPECTRUM!

Science is fun knee
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Nov 11, 2015 9:46 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Science is fun knee » Wed Nov 11, 2015 9:52 pm UTC

I love XKCD, but dispute the premise of the original post. Many or most of the songs listed were written during WWII, in part to improve the morale of soldiers abroad and the citizens at home.

The continued popularity in the 1950s, as demonstrated in the graph, is likely more a measure of post-war sales to adults than to the two- to ten-year old baby boomers. Or it could be a measure of radio popularity, again tied to the demographics of post-war adults, rather than the children.

Here are some important specifics about some of these songs:
1. Robert May, who conceived the Rudolph character for Montgomery Ward in 1939, was born in 1905. His brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, wrote the song eventually made popular by Gene Autry in 1949.
2. Sammy Cahn, who wrote Let It Snow in 1945, was born in 1913. Trivia: This song never once mentions "Christmas."
3. I'll Be Home For Christmas was written in 1943 by Jim Gannon (born in 1900) to appeal to the soldiers overseas.
4. White Christmas, released in 1942, was written by Irving Berlin (born Israel Isidore Baline, May 11, 1888).
5. Katherine Davis, who wrote Little Drummer Boy (Carol of the Drum) in 1941, was born in 1892.
6. Blue Christmas was first recorded by Doye O'Dell in 1948. It was written by Billy Hayes (born 1906) and Johnson (born 1903). Elvis was later.

Finally, I don't dispute the conclusion. My (boomer) generation f*cked some things up. We did some good stuff, too. Now it's your turn. I hope your record is better than ours. Your kids will judge you. Good luck with that.

User avatar
Copper Bezel
Posts: 2416
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2011 6:35 am UTC
Location: Web exclusive!

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby Copper Bezel » Fri Nov 13, 2015 3:46 am UTC

Ne was? He didn't blame Baby Boomers for making the songs popular then. Just said that the songs they would have been exposed to in their childhood Christmases would have been these ones that are now still popular in the US. Presumably Baby Boomers had a hand in keeping them popular, but the joke only requires that we are in fact deluged with the set of songs that would have been familiar to those kids.
So much depends upon a red wheel barrow (>= XXII) but it is not going to be installed.

she / her / her

jewish_scientist
Posts: 678
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2014 3:15 pm UTC

Re: 0988: "Tradition"

Postby jewish_scientist » Fri Sep 15, 2017 3:25 pm UTC

I thinking about writing an article for my college's newspaper based on the title text. I need some more examples though.

For example, the idea that adults are suppose to move out and never move back in with their parents has no historical backing. In every agricultural society that I know of, extended families live together geographically. In pre-WWII industrialized society, multiple nuclear families would live in the same apartment. Only in post-WWII society, which experienced an unprecedented period of economic growth, was it common for young adults to not live with their parents. The Baby-Boomers are the outliers and millennials are following the true American tradition.


Return to “Individual XKCD Comic Threads”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Canard and 69 guests