0992: "Mnemonics"

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radon-nikodyn
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby radon-nikodyn » Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:31 pm UTC

Elmach wrote:I've always remembered pi by

3.14159, 2653589 79 323 846 26 433

with some odd timing on the last few bits. Am I really the only person who learned it like this?


Nope, that’s how I do Numbers too. Assigning a beat is a very minimalistic Method to memorise both Numbers and Passages, so I use it too. This is an effective Way to memorise large Volumes of Data. (I don’t know but I suspect this or Song is a major Way People memorise in Oral Societies.) Anyway, glad to see someone else doing so!

jsabrown
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby jsabrown » Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:51 pm UTC

My female circuits teacher taught us "bad boys race our young girls but violet generally wins."

areg
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby areg » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:24 pm UTC

I didn't see this one posted. I learned this in 7th grade (1987), thus its incompleteness. I'm sure there are some creative types who could come up with the last 4, bringing this up to date.

1 Who George Washington, 1789-1797
2 are John Adams, 1797-1801
3 jolly Thomas Jefferson, 1801-1809
4 mighty James Madison, 1809-1817
5 men? James Monroe, 1817-1825
6 Andrew John Quincy Adams, 1825-1829
7 Jackson Andrew Jackson, 1829-1837
8 visited Martin Van Buren, 1837-1841
9 home William Henry Harrison, 1841
10 town John Tyler, 1841-1845
11 people James Knox Polk, 1845-1849
12 to Zachary Taylor, 1849-1850
13 find Millard Fillmore, 1850-1853
14 pie Franklin Pierce, 1853-1857
15 but James Buchanan, 1857-1861
16 Lincoln Abraham Lincoln, 1861-1865
17 joyously Andrew Johnson, 1865-1869
18 gave Ulysses Simpson Grant, 1869-1877
19 him Rutherford Birchard Hayes, 1877-1881
20 gum. James Abram Garfield, 1881
21 Arthur Chester Alan Arthur, 1881-1885
22 could Grover Cleveland, 1885-1889
23 have Benjamin Harrison, 1889-1893
24 caught Grover Cleveland, 1893-1897
25 me William McKinley, 1897-1901
26 running Theodore Roosevelt, 1901-1909
27 through William Howard Taft, 1909-1913
28 water Woodrow Wilson, 1913-1921
29 hardly Warren Gamaliel Harding, 1921-1923
30 cool. Calvin Coolidge, 1923-1929
31 He Herbert Clark Hoover, 1929-1933
32 ran Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 1933-1945
33 Truman Harry S. Truman, 1945-1953
34 everywhere, Dwight David Eisenhower, 1953-1961
35 kicking John Fitzgerald Kennedy, 1961-1963
36 Johnson's Lyndon Baines Johnson, 1963-1969
37 nose Richard Milhous Nixon, 1969-1974
38 for Gerald Rudolph Ford, 1974-1977
39 Carter's James Earl Carter, Jr., 1977-1981
40 reelection. Ronald Wilson Reagan, 1981-1989
41 George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993
42 William Jefferson Clinton, 1993-2001
43 George Walker Bush, 2001-2009
44 Barack Hussein Obama, 2009-

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SpringLoaded12
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby SpringLoaded12 » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:45 pm UTC

Anyone got one for colors of the rainbow, besides the expired "Richard of York" one? (fuck indigo, it doesn't count)
"It's easy to forget what a sin is in the middle of a battlefield." "Opposite over hypotenuse, dipshit."

ahecht
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby ahecht » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:54 pm UTC

My planets mnemonic (including the Sun and Asteroid Belt) was always:

Sometimes Many Very Early Men Ate Juicy Steaks Using No Plates

After the demotion of Pluto, I changed to:

Sometimes Many Very Early Men Ate Juicy Steaks Using Napkins

Nagase
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Nagase » Tue Dec 20, 2011 2:55 pm UTC

Did anyone read the alt text and automatically assume the two Mnemonics were related?

tjodekirk
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby tjodekirk » Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:00 pm UTC

The one I always learned for resistors was "**triggery misogyny not found**"

Codesmith
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Codesmith » Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:11 pm UTC

Having an old British electonics teacher means that (eventually) you get the rude version of the resistor code. I had already memorized the codes at that point, but it made for some chuckles in class.

Growing up in Canada means everybody knows SI prefixs down to milli, so the one we had for below that was 'Many (micro) Nuns (nano) Prefer (pico) Fat (femto) Abbots (atto)'. I don't think I've every heard zepto or yocto ever actually used other than as trivia questions. And as a matter of fact, I didn't attend a Catholic school. :)

And from my time in the service and teaching First Aid, the Kendrick Extraction Device strap tightening order: 'My (middle) Baby (bottom) Looks (legs) Hot (head) Tonight (top)'

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CzarMatt
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby CzarMatt » Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:16 pm UTC

Zomba wrote:I am a horrible person for remembering this but:

**triggery misogyny not found**
:twisted:
(Black Brown Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Violet Grey White)

I blame my public school education for that mnemonic.


I learned a very similar, yet way more offensive mnemonic for resistor codes back in high school. :D

TexasToast
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby TexasToast » Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:59 pm UTC

dado wrote:There are also mnemonics for pi. I'm French, so I know this one:
<snip>
What mnemonics do you have in English for pi?


The one I learned (for 20 decimal places) is
Pie
I wish I could determine pi
"Eureka!" cried the great inventor.
Christmas pudding, Christmas pie
Is the problem's very center.

Loonytalker
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Loonytalker » Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:13 pm UTC

Geologic periods (paleozoic) Children On School Dorms Must Persecute Preppies
Geologic epochs (tertiary) Peter Eats Out Mary's Pussy

rar745
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics" - Music Theory

Postby rar745 » Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:26 pm UTC

FWIW, here's all the musical posts in this thread, so far...

The 7 Modes of Western Music: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian...
Pesto wrote:I Don't Particularly Like My Ass
This really needs to be followed by an "L" word. Any verb will do. Use your imagination. It probably came from this one: I Don't Particularly Like Modes A Lot. Other ones: I Don't Play Like My Aunt Lilly, I Don't Play Loud Music After Lunch, and Infant Dolly Parton Liked Music A Lot.

The Musical Staff: treble clef lines (EGBDF), bass clef lines (ACEG), and outside of the treble clef (CDGA)...
jonadab wrote:Every Good Boy Does Fine, and All Cars Eat Gas
prolog wrote:Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge
JudeMorrigan wrote:Every Gummy Bear Dies Fatefully
Linux0s wrote:Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge
ndkid wrote:All Cars Eat Gas, All Cows Eat Grass, and All Cars Eat Grass (I always think of one of the tractors from Cars munching on some grass.)
Here's two more: Every Grandma Bakes Delicious Fudge, and Can Dad Get Apples.

The Circle of Fifths (FCGDAEB) defines the order of sharps. Its reverse is the Circle of Fourths (BEADGCF), which defines the order of flats...
Novamystique wrote:Fred Calmly Goes Down And Eats Boobs
Steve the Pocket wrote:Fat Cows Go Down Alleys Eating Blueberries
Absotively wrote:Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle, and Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father
markfiend wrote:Fat Cats Go Down And Eat Beef, and Bad Eggs Are Disgusting, Generally Causing Farts
For flats, I had been taught to just use the word "bead" and the acronym for "Greatest Common Factor". And for sharps: Father Christmas Got Dad An Electric Blanket, or the classic Fat Cats Go Down And Eat Bread (common variation: Fat Cats Go Down Alleys Eating "some B item") which worked well, for it was monosyllabic (simple to verbalize/utilize in the heat of any musical moment) and not too clever or strange (it reduced distraction). As a kid, decades ago, it seemed to me like a nonsensical "Dick-and-Jane"-ish thing to memorize, so I came up with my own: Farts Can Get Dangerous After Eating Beans. How lovely. :)

chenille
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby chenille » Tue Dec 20, 2011 7:31 pm UTC

For those who would like to include Pluto and the other little round bodies, I'd like to suggest: My Very Excellent Mother Can Just Serve Us Nachos Or Perhaps Hot Quick Meals Eaten Slowly.
That's for Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Orcus, Pluto, Haumea, Quaoar, Makemake, Eris, and Sedna, to be updated as needed. For those who'd like to include Pluto and skip newer discoveries, I'd like to suggest science shouldn't be about nostalgia.

All this talk on mneumonics and no mention of the rising proletariat, but that was my favorite part.

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Wnderer
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Wnderer » Tue Dec 20, 2011 8:31 pm UTC

chenille wrote:For those who would like to include Pluto and the other little round bodies, I'd like to suggest: My Very Excellent Mother Can Just Serve Us Nachos Or Perhaps Hot Quick Meals Eaten Slowly.
That's for Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Orcus, Pluto, Haumea, Quaoar, Makemake, Eris, and Sedna, to be updated as needed. For those who'd like to include Pluto and skip newer discoveries, I'd like to suggest science shouldn't be about nostalgia.

All this talk on mneumonics and no mention of the rising proletariat, but that was my favorite part.


Still, the new definition of a planet is stupid. The test should go something like

1. Shape: If it's round,
a. Produces lots of nuclear fusion: Star
b. Not a star and orbits star: Planet
c. Not a star and orbits planet: Moon
d. Not a star doesn't orbit anything: Rogue Planet.
2. Composition:
a. Mostly Gas: Gas Giant
b. Mostly Rock and Metal: Terrestrial
c. Mostly Ices: Cryo
3. Sweeps out orbit:
a. Yes: Major
b. No: Minor
4. Origin
a. Created with star: Native
b. Captured by star: Captured

So the Earth is a Native Major Terrestrial Planet
Jupiter is a Native Major Gas Giant Planet
Pluto is a Native Minor Cryo Planet. (Maybe, I'm not sure what Pluto's composition is)

Do something similar for moons. Phobos and Deimos should not be moons but natural satellites. Neither should the hundreds of potato shaped rocks orbiting the Gas Giants. "We discovered a new moon, today", should be a big deal.

The Anon
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby The Anon » Tue Dec 20, 2011 8:51 pm UTC

bmonk wrote:Of course, if you're gonna include Pluto among the planets, you should really include at least Eris, for ten. You could make it five: Ceres, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris, for thirteen. Four more known objects are virtually certain to be dwarf planets--large enough to be round--bringing us up to likely seventeen planets. So, even by your rules, there are not nine planets! Maybe eight, or ten, or thirteen, seventeen, a couple of hundred, but not nine!


Eris yes definetly. However the others are as far as we can tell, much much smaller than even Pluto, let alone Pluto/Charon Binary.
I use my own system to determine whether or not something is or isn't a planet.
1. It must be in orbit around a star
2. Massive enough to achieve hydrostatic equilibrium
3. Must have a radius of at least 1,000km (A bit arbitrary I know, but a nice fixed figure forms a very good cutoff line)

I'll admit it's not perfect but it works and it prevents a list of planets being several hundered entries long. Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto/Charon, Eris. I think we can live with 10 planets.

I'd actually really like to be able to include Ceres, but it's just too small :(

Paulmichael
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Paulmichael » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:02 pm UTC

After a quick search through the thread, it seems the one I was taught my Freshman year in high school for the OSI model hasn't been added yet:

Application
Presentation
Session
Transport
Network
Data-link
Physical

"All People Seem To Need Data Processing"

8)

BastidBob
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby BastidBob » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:11 pm UTC

The mnemonic I used for biology was in reverse order, ending in Domain, not Kingdom: Some Guys Fart Occasionally 'Cause Poop Keeps Dumping. I'll never forget it.

YeTr2
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby YeTr2 » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:51 pm UTC

origional traditional was 'black boys'
the P.C. traditional version was 'bad boys'
Go find an old retired (white) electrical engineer and ask.

chenille
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby chenille » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:03 pm UTC

Wnderer wrote:Still, the new definition of a planet is stupid. The test should go something like
1. Shape: If it's round,
a. Produces lots of nuclear fusion: Star
b. Not a star and orbits star: Planet

It would be fine by me. I don't like the whole "there are nine planets", because it's just insisting on what you learned in school and ignoring new findings. If you want Pluto, you should be served "Nacho Platters Eventually" at the minimum, as The Anon says. I like your definition better still, and that's why I gave the longer mnemonic for exactly that.

Even so, I've come to see some reason behind the IAU's definition after reading on other solar systems like Epsilon Eridani and Beta Pictoris. When you're more interested in the structure of the system than single objects, you naturally start talking about belts of debris, and regions where it has all been cleared out by a single mass. I'm not averse with looking at our sun the same way (especially since that's why they reclassified Ceres).

Anyways, not meaning to start an argument...I just think that for all the fans of Pluto, there could be a little more love for its brothers and sisters.

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Diadem
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Diadem » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:19 pm UTC

thegreenmercenary wrote:So, I'm going to be that guy.

Pluto is still a planet. It wasn't 'downgraded' or any such nonsense. The IAU just redid their classification system to be more precise. Instead of everything being called a planet, now there are different classes of planets. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are terrestrial planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are gaseous planets, and Pluto, along with Ceres, Sedna, Eris, and a whole bunch of other crap we're only now discovering, are called dwarf planets.

As others have already mentioned, dwarf planets are not planets. They are dwarf planets.

Saying a dwarf planet isn't a real planet is ridiculous. (...) Is a white dwarf star not a white star?

No, actually. White dwarf stars aren't stars. They are stellar remnants.

It's quite common for a thing called <modifier> <name> to not be a part of group <name>. For example Koala bears are not bears. A muskrat is not a rat. A sea cow is not a cow. A sea star is not a star. It's very very common.
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engr
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby engr » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:10 am UTC

YeTr2 wrote:origional traditional was 'black boys'
the P.C. traditional version was 'bad boys'
Go find an old retired (white) electrical engineer and ask.


Interesting. I learned the old version **triggery misogyny and racism not found** from an engineer in his 30-s, so I guess it is still somewhat popular. I like the racist version better because there's less chance to confuse B(-lack) with B(-rown).
Last edited by apricity on Sun Dec 25, 2011 5:59 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: unnecessary triggery language
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distractedSofty
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby distractedSofty » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:25 am UTC

TexasToast wrote:
dado wrote:There are also mnemonics for pi. I'm French, so I know this one:
<snip>
What mnemonics do you have in English for pi?


The one I learned (for 20 decimal places) is
Pie
I wish I could determine pi
"Eureka!" cried the great inventor.
Christmas pudding, Christmas pie
Is the problem's very center.

... il finito

I took me a while to work out how these mnemonics for pi are even supposed to work. Are they really taught as memory aids, and more importantly, do they actually work? It seems like there's much more effort to go from a word to a number than the initial letter mnemonics.

fagricipni
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby fagricipni » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:51 am UTC

Wnderer wrote:Leo goes Ger
Loss of Electrons Oxidation.
Gain of Electrons Reduction.


I must be strange because I never used mnemonics like the ones discussed on this thread; however, I did have a strange way of remembering reduction/oxidation: a decrease in charge is reduction, but one has to be clear on the definition of a decrease in charge -- it includes the sign: yes, going from positive to less positive or neutral is a decrease in charge by this meaning, but so is going from negative or neutral to more negative; but going from negative to less negative is an increase in charge. Some examples:

Fe_3+ to Fe_2+ is an decrease in charge (as one would expect)
but
Cl to Cl_(1)- is also a decrease in charge (by the definition that I use to remember the reduction/oxidation definitions) because -1 is less than 0.

The Cl case shows what I mean by "including the sign".

Of course, once I have the definition of reduction, I also have the definition of oxidation (in this context) which is merely the opposite of reduction. I call my definition of reduction a "'logical explanation'", but I suspect that it has nothing to with the actual explanation of the derivation of the terms, but that doesn't matter for remembering the definition.

For some reason, I find it easier to remember my "logical explanation" than to remember a "meaningless mnemonic"; it's an interesting property of me.

barasawa
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby barasawa » Wed Dec 21, 2011 2:15 am UTC

If I could remember the mnemonic, I could remember what the mnemonic is supposed to help me to remember in the first place without the mnemonic.

Yes, that's right, for me a mnemonic just increases the memory work load.

Seamus
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Seamus » Wed Dec 21, 2011 2:22 am UTC

Here are the mnemonics I learned for the time periods:

Paleozoic:
Carl's Old Shirt Doesn't Match Pete's Pants

That's separating out the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian from the Carboniferous.

Cenozoic:
Pigeon Egg Omelettes Make People Puke

Paleocene, Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene, Pleistocene.

teucer
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby teucer » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:09 am UTC

dado wrote:What mnemonics do you have in English for pi?


Poe, E. "Near a Raven."

freiler
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby freiler » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:21 am UTC

I always wondered why there wasn't a decent SI measurement mnemonic, and I came up with one forever ago that goes from top to bottom by thousandths, then by tenths in the middle, then expands back to thousandths.

Error
Prone
Thomas
Gaseous
Met
kyle
hertz
Dad
dad
cried
"my
mu-cow
now
plays
for
aerosmith"

Sara
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Sara » Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:27 am UTC

Neptune and Pluto switched places while I was in grade school, so we learned both

My very elegant mother just sat upon nine peanuts.

and

My very elegant mother just sat upon pine needles.

stinkytoe
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby stinkytoe » Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:59 am UTC

Phylum, class, order, family, genus, species

Kyle, Please come over for gay sex

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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby SecondTalon » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:03 pm UTC

engr wrote:I like the racist version better....
Even in context, you're still a jackass.
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby Belial » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:38 pm UTC

The next person to post the old, shitty misogynistic (and intermittently racist) resistor code like they're being adorably transgressive or otherwise wax excited about it is going out the door.
addams wrote:A drunk neighbor is better than a sober Belial.


They/them

sgrandpre
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby sgrandpre » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:06 pm UTC

The mnemonic I learned for Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species was:
Kill Pussy Cats On Fiery Gas Stoves

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markfiend
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby markfiend » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:51 pm UTC

Given modern cladistics and phylogenetic nomenclature, isn't the Kingdoms, phyla, classes, orders, families, genera, species thing obsolete now anyway?
advanced, forthright, signifficant
pronouns: he/him

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SpringLoaded12
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby SpringLoaded12 » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:52 pm UTC

engr wrote:I like the racist version better because there's less chance to confuse B(-lack) with B(-rown).

That sounds sillier out of context, regardless of what Talon says :P
"It's easy to forget what a sin is in the middle of a battlefield." "Opposite over hypotenuse, dipshit."

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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby YttriumOx » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:59 pm UTC

Elmach wrote:I've always remembered pi by

3.14159, 2653589 79 323 846 26 433

with some odd timing on the last few bits. Am I really the only person who learned it like this?

I remember it as: 3.141, 59, 26, 535, 8979, 3238, 4626, 43383, 27, 95, 02, 88, 41, 97, 16, 93993, 75, 105. There's no particular "beat" or anything to it, it's just what seems to "fit" in my head nicely. (people always tell me that since the next digit is over 5 (I just looked it up - it's 8 ), I should round to 106 at the end, but I know that'll mess me up if I do want to memorise more later)
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olszowka
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby olszowka » Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:17 pm UTC

Here's a mnemonic I've never seen repeated anywhere. It's a limeric for what DDT stands for.

A mosquito was heard to exclaim
"They're trying to poison my brain!"
The cause of its sorrow
was paradichloro-
diphenyl-trichloroethane.

pierreb
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby pierreb » Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:26 pm UTC

Mine for planets is "Old friend you threw me on a new planet"...

I've been raised in French.

TexasToast
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby TexasToast » Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:07 pm UTC

distractedSofty wrote:
TexasToast wrote:
dado wrote:There are also mnemonics for pi. I'm French, so I know this one:
<snip>
What mnemonics do you have in English for pi?


The one I learned (for 20 decimal places) is
Pie
I wish I could determine pi
"Eureka!" cried the great inventor.
Christmas pudding, Christmas pie
Is the problem's very center.

... il finito

I took me a while to work out how these mnemonics for pi are even supposed to work. Are they really taught as memory aids, and more importantly, do they actually work? It seems like there's much more effort to go from a word to a number than the initial letter mnemonics.


I can't say that I've ever needed pi to 21 significant figures. Anyone who does is most likely using a computer. The standard 3 is often overkill in day-to-day use. But I read the poem once, and it stuck. I didn't intentionally work to memorize it. And if I ever want to count the letters silently, I could list out the digits as a nerdly parlor trick.

pinkie pi
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby pinkie pi » Wed Dec 21, 2011 11:24 pm UTC

Here's one for the order of operations:

Pinkie Eats Many Desserts And Snacks.

Or: Pinkie Eats Many Delicious Apple Snacks.
Last edited by pinkie pi on Thu Dec 22, 2011 9:13 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

distractedSofty
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Re: 0992: "Mnemonics"

Postby distractedSofty » Thu Dec 22, 2011 12:31 am UTC

TexasToast wrote:I can't say that I've ever needed pi to 21 significant figures. Anyone who does is most likely using a computer. The standard 3 is often overkill in day-to-day use. But I read the poem once, and it stuck. I didn't intentionally work to memorize it. And if I ever want to count the letters silently, I could list out the digits as a nerdly parlor trick.

I found this page on a quick search for "pi mnemonics", which mentions the book "Not A Wake", a 10000 word work meeting this restriction.

So as restricted writing, I can definitely see the appeal.


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