The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Seen something interesting in the news or on the intertubes? Discuss it here.

Moderators: Zamfir, Hawknc, Moderators General, Prelates

User avatar
SDK
Posts: 463
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 7:40 pm UTC
Location: Canada

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby SDK » Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:55 pm UTC

The copyright will run out around the time they want to start using it in space, so there's still potential.
The biggest number (63 quintillion googols in debt)

User avatar
Angua
Don't call her Delphine.
Posts: 5583
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 12:42 pm UTC
Location: UK/[St. Kitts and] Nevis Occasionally, I migrate to the US for a bit

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Angua » Wed Sep 21, 2016 7:57 pm UTC

I know, but they don't even mention it in the news article!

Normally anything that's the slightest bit mobile or wireless gets touted as a tricorder.
'Look, sir, I know Angua. She's not the useless type. She doesn't stand there and scream helplessly. She makes other people do that.'
GNU Terry Pratchett

User avatar
Dauric
Posts: 3740
Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:58 pm UTC
Location: In midair, traversing laterally over a container of sharks. No water, just sharks, with lasers.

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Dauric » Wed Sep 21, 2016 8:03 pm UTC

SDK wrote:The copyright will run out around the time they want to start using it in space, so there's still potential.

Depends on if Paramount keeps making Star Trek films and TV shows. U.S. copyrights can be extended beyond the "author's lifespan + 70 years" as long as someone fills out the paperwork.
We're in the traffic-chopper over the XKCD boards where there's been a thread-derailment. A Liquified Godwin spill has evacuated threads in a fourty-post radius of the accident, Lolcats and TVTropes have broken free of their containers. It is believed that the Point has perished.

User avatar
eran_rathan
Mostly Wrong
Posts: 1666
Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:36 pm UTC
Location: everywhere, including space.

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby eran_rathan » Wed Sep 21, 2016 9:16 pm UTC

yep, even the Google X Prize-Tricorder has "Tricorder,Star Trek etc. is property of CBS Studios and used under licence."


http://tricorder.xprize.org/
"Trying to build a proper foundation for knowledge is blippery."
"Squirrels are crazy enough to be test pilots."
"Google tells me you are not unique. You are, however, wrong."
rawr!

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5562
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Sun Oct 02, 2016 1:03 pm UTC

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/arc ... zy/308873/
Parasites may be altering our behavior more than we think. The core studies mostly focus on toxo plasmodium that infects cats and rats. But it's linked to infection and schizophrenia. Mechanism is the similar to rats, damage the gray matter and boost dopamine levels. That's why anti schizophrenia drugs treat plasmodium parasites.

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Thu Nov 10, 2016 9:40 am UTC

Partially-paralysed monkeys have learned to walk again with a brain implant that uses wireless signals to bypass broken nerves in the spinal cord and reanimate the useless limbs.

The implant is the first to restore walking ability in paralysed primates and raises the prospect of radical new therapies for people with devastating spinal injuries.

Scientists hope the technology will help people who have lost the use of their legs, by sending movement signals from their brains to electrodes in the spine that activate the leg muscles.

One rhesus macaque that was fitted with the new implant regained the ability to walk only six days after it was partially paralysed in a surgical procedure that severed some of the nerves that controlled its right hind leg.

“It was a big surprise for us,” said Grégoire Courtine, a neuroscientist who led the research at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. “The gait was not perfect, but it was almost like normal walking. The foot was not dragging and it was fully weight bearing.”

A second animal in the study that received more serious damage to the nerves controlling its right hind leg recovered the ability to walk two weeks after having the device fitted, according to a report published in the journal, Nature. Both monkeys regained full mobility in three months.

The “brain-spine interface” is the latest breakthrough to come from the rapidly-advancing area of neuroprosthetics. Scientists in the field aim to read intentions in the brain’s activity and use it to control computers, robotic arms and even paralysed limbs.

Courtine’s team spent seven years developing the approach which has four major components. The first is a brain implant which records activity from 50 to 100 neurons that help to control the monkey’s right hind leg. This fizz of activity is beamed wirelessly in real time to a computer, where it is decoded into intentions and sent to the third part of the system, a pulse generator. The pulses it produces are then beamed to a second implant fitted at the base of the monkey’s spine. Here, the implant stimulates spinal nerves that activate specific groups of leg muscles.

The brain implant picks up only broad information about movement, starting with the intention to walk, which the scientists can detect before the animal takes a step. Once in motion, the brain activity controls whether the leg pushes backwards or lifts and moves forwards. In able animals, the spine processes these brain signals and activates the muscles needed for walking. In those with serious spinal injuries, the signals do not get through.

The system is built from components that are already approved for human use. As such, Courtine believes it could be ripe for human trials in as little as five years. The first application of the system is likely to be in hospital rehabilitation units. To help humans walk on two paralysed legs is a harder challenge, because the system has to control balance and steering as well as simple gait movements. The computer and batteries needed to run the system would need to be wearable or implanted too.

“I don’t imagine someone walking down the street with a brain-spine interface. That’s a bit extravagant at this stage. But in the next five years, someone with a spinal injury could have a better recovery after being implanted with this and having robot-assisted rehabilitation,” Courtine told the Guardian.


Hope they have good security on these transmissions - imagine the fun trolls could have hacking and controlling people's limbs...!

link

User avatar
HES
Posts: 4721
Joined: Fri May 10, 2013 7:13 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby HES » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:28 am UTC

I'm curious as to why they went with wireless at all. Security, efficiency, latency, would all be better wired, no?
He/Him/His Image

User avatar
Zamfir
I built a novelty castle, the irony was lost on some.
Posts: 7220
Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 2:43 pm UTC
Location: Nederland

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Zamfir » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:29 am UTC

spoilered by Zamfir. Elasto: in the future, please post shorter extracts. First, your long quotes break the flow of the thread; second, the legality (and morality) of such long quotes is dubious. The quote can give an impression of the article, some key points. People should visit the link for the entire article itself.
Spoiler:
elasto wrote:
Partially-paralysed monkeys have learned to walk again with a brain implant that uses wireless signals to bypass broken nerves in the spinal cord and reanimate the useless limbs.

The implant is the first to restore walking ability in paralysed primates and raises the prospect of radical new therapies for people with devastating spinal injuries.

Scientists hope the technology will help people who have lost the use of their legs, by sending movement signals from their brains to electrodes in the spine that activate the leg muscles.

One rhesus macaque that was fitted with the new implant regained the ability to walk only six days after it was partially paralysed in a surgical procedure that severed some of the nerves that controlled its right hind leg.

“It was a big surprise for us,” said Grégoire Courtine, a neuroscientist who led the research at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. “The gait was not perfect, but it was almost like normal walking. The foot was not dragging and it was fully weight bearing.”

A second animal in the study that received more serious damage to the nerves controlling its right hind leg recovered the ability to walk two weeks after having the device fitted, according to a report published in the journal, Nature. Both monkeys regained full mobility in three months.

The “brain-spine interface” is the latest breakthrough to come from the rapidly-advancing area of neuroprosthetics. Scientists in the field aim to read intentions in the brain’s activity and use it to control computers, robotic arms and even paralysed limbs.

Courtine’s team spent seven years developing the approach which has four major components. The first is a brain implant which records activity from 50 to 100 neurons that help to control the monkey’s right hind leg. This fizz of activity is beamed wirelessly in real time to a computer, where it is decoded into intentions and sent to the third part of the system, a pulse generator. The pulses it produces are then beamed to a second implant fitted at the base of the monkey’s spine. Here, the implant stimulates spinal nerves that activate specific groups of leg muscles.

The brain implant picks up only broad information about movement, starting with the intention to walk, which the scientists can detect before the animal takes a step. Once in motion, the brain activity controls whether the leg pushes backwards or lifts and moves forwards. In able animals, the spine processes these brain signals and activates the muscles needed for walking. In those with serious spinal injuries, the signals do not get through.

The system is built from components that are already approved for human use. As such, Courtine believes it could be ripe for human trials in as little as five years. The first application of the system is likely to be in hospital rehabilitation units. To help humans walk on two paralysed legs is a harder challenge, because the system has to control balance and steering as well as simple gait movements. The computer and batteries needed to run the system would need to be wearable or implanted too.

“I don’t imagine someone walking down the street with a brain-spine interface. That’s a bit extravagant at this stage. But in the next five years, someone with a spinal injury could have a better recovery after being implanted with this and having robot-assisted rehabilitation,” Courtine told the Guardian.


Hope they have good security on these transmissions - imagine the fun trolls could have hacking and controlling people's limbs...!

link

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Thu Nov 10, 2016 11:17 am UTC

HES wrote:I'm curious as to why they went with wireless at all. Security, efficiency, latency, would all be better wired, no?

How are you going to stop a monkey chewing on the wires or getting them wrapped around stuff as it moves around? Don't think the computer is small enough to actually attach to the monkey as a backpack or whatever yet.

Plus wires coming out of a brain implant will mean it takes longer to heal and might even represent a greater risk of post-op infection.

---

Zamfir: Apologies - I thought I did only include key points - I edited out more than half the article; Plus there's diagrams and video I could have included but left out. It's still well worth following the link.

User avatar
HES
Posts: 4721
Joined: Fri May 10, 2013 7:13 pm UTC
Location: England

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby HES » Thu Nov 10, 2016 3:19 pm UTC

Right, I TL;DR'd the quote and missed that there was computer processing involved in the middle.
He/Him/His Image

User avatar
Thesh
Made to Fuck Dinosaurs
Posts: 5268
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 1:55 am UTC
Location: Colorado

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Thesh » Thu Nov 10, 2016 3:34 pm UTC

Ooh! This reminds me of this idea that I had for this fictional dystopian society where everyone was immortal and the punishment for any crime was having your limbs controlled and being forced to perform hard labor until your limbs physically give in, at which you are given an hour's rest with an IV providing fluids and the nutrition (and drugs) you need to keep you going as long as possible, while nanomachines in your body repair any serious injuries or illnesses before you have to get back to work - this occurs repeatedly, for eternity until there is no longer enough energy available to sustain them. It wasn't paralysis and remote control in my idea, it was just a brain implant forcing them to move their legs as if they were controlling them, so they still feel all the aches, pains, fatigue, and sleep deprivation.
Honesty replaced by greed, they gave us the reason to fight and bleed
They try to torch our faith and hope, spit at our presence and detest our goals

User avatar
Liri
Healthy non-floating pooper reporting for doodie.
Posts: 650
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 8:11 pm UTC
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Liri » Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:46 pm UTC

You should tell President-elect Trump your idea.


don't hate me
kalira wrote:But your own butt is always in the past, because it's behind you.

User avatar
CorruptUser
Posts: 8429
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 10:12 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby CorruptUser » Thu Nov 10, 2016 8:06 pm UTC

I also had ideas for a fictional dystopia using similar technology. Basically, an invading army would capture enemy soldiers and civilians and install various nerve staplings and remote controls that mess with people's minds in order to create more soldiers. It was a combination of direct control over all nerves leaving the brain, and "enhancements" to the brain that screwed with your senses and you acted based on rather inaccurate information (think the Syndicate games), depending on how cruel they wanted to be. You'd have to watch as the remote controlled body of your own mother then tore apart your siblings before attacking you. The story would have basically been about a woman who leads a resistance, only to halfway through (spoiler alert) find out she had been nerve stapled a quarter of the way into the story, and much of the story would then be her fighting with her own senses to try and get unstapled.

Of course, I was never actually planning to writing that story, so steal all you want.

User avatar
TvT Rivals
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2016 2:27 am UTC
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby TvT Rivals » Sat Nov 12, 2016 4:05 am UTC

@Thesh: Sounds like these punished people will become stronger than Schwarzenegger like this.

User avatar
Eternal Density
Posts: 5409
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 12:37 am UTC
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Eternal Density » Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:13 am UTC

The Reaper wrote:
zmatt wrote:For the past 15 years I have heard people saying a cloned mammoth is only x years off. I will believe it when I see it.

You mean this? http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/scie ... years.html
It was put on hold for awhile because the cell sample was badly damaged. Its back underway, supposedly, as of this year. ~2016 is your estimated mammoth day, assuming everything works and goes as hoped.

So how's that mammoth going?
Play the game of Time! castle.chirpingmustard.com Hotdog Vending Supplier But what is this?
In the Marvel vs. DC film-making war, we're all winners.

User avatar
Whizbang
The Best Reporter
Posts: 2237
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2012 7:50 pm UTC
Location: New Hampshire, USA

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Whizbang » Mon Nov 14, 2016 11:56 am UTC

To be fair, it is a mammoth sized task.

User avatar
The Great Hippo
Swans ARE SHARP
Posts: 6780
Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2007 4:43 am UTC
Location: behind you

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby The Great Hippo » Mon Nov 14, 2016 12:03 pm UTC

Whizbang wrote:To be fair, it is a mammoth sized task.
It's woolly possible that it won't be done before 2017.

User avatar
CorruptUser
Posts: 8429
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 10:12 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby CorruptUser » Mon Nov 14, 2016 3:00 pm UTC

I'm not sure the scientists are up to the tusk.

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Mon Nov 14, 2016 3:10 pm UTC

It's a real hairy one for sure

User avatar
CorruptUser
Posts: 8429
Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 10:12 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby CorruptUser » Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:01 pm UTC

Too many puns, we need to trunk-ate some of the comments here.

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Mon Nov 14, 2016 4:09 pm UTC

'ear 'ear.

Some people are too keen to blow their own trumpet.

User avatar
Diemo
Posts: 386
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 8:43 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Diemo » Mon Nov 14, 2016 5:47 pm UTC

Come on, peeps, most of these are irrelephant
In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
--Douglas Adams

User avatar
Eternal Density
Posts: 5409
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2008 12:37 am UTC
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Eternal Density » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:35 am UTC

Whoops, I set off a pun-storm. Hopefully this is the tail end of it.
Play the game of Time! castle.chirpingmustard.com Hotdog Vending Supplier But what is this?
In the Marvel vs. DC film-making war, we're all winners.

User avatar
ucim
Posts: 5177
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2012 3:23 pm UTC
Location: The One True Thread

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby ucim » Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:58 pm UTC

Doubt it. But maybe it will paws for a moment.

Jose
Order of the Sillies, Honoris Causam - bestowed by charlie_grumbles on NP 859 * OTTscar winner: Wordsmith - bestowed by yappobiscuts and the OTT on NP 1832 * Ecclesiastical Calendar of the Order of the Holy Contradiction * Please help addams if you can. She needs all of us.

User avatar
Diemo
Posts: 386
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 8:43 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Diemo » Wed Nov 16, 2016 5:43 pm UTC

That would be a tail to tell
In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
--Douglas Adams

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5562
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Fri Nov 18, 2016 11:23 pm UTC

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/why ... alth-care/
Remember when people complained about how much the US spends on healthcare, yet gets middling results? Turns out the answer isn't quite so simple.
“The total spending on health care plus social services; that’s what we’re spending on health. That’s critical,” Bradley said. “That’s the great American mistake … separating in our brains the difference between health care and health.”
Bradley said it makes more sense to think of health care and social services spending together. By that measure, the U.S. ranks roughly in the middle of OECD countries.1 That is more in line with U.S. life expectancy and other measures of health.
But while combining health care and social services makes the disparity between U.S. spending and health outcomes look less severe, it also highlights how differently the U.S. spends its money than other rich nations. The U.S. spends much less than many European countries on social services, which mostly benefit the poor, and much more on health care, a disproportionate amount of which is spent on the rich.
“In our country, about two-thirds of health care spending is government money, but a lot of that is going for the care of wealthy people,” said David U. Himmelstein, a doctor and professor at the City University of New York’s Hunter College. “And as a result, wealthy people pay very, very little and poor people don’t get as much.”

Two big things are the cause, we don't spend much on social safety nets, and the money we do spend on healthcare primarily benefits the wealthy.

User avatar
Liri
Healthy non-floating pooper reporting for doodie.
Posts: 650
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2014 8:11 pm UTC
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Liri » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:56 am UTC

You can stop reminding us all that Bernie Sanders was the salve we needed any time now. :cry:
kalira wrote:But your own butt is always in the past, because it's behind you.

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Wed Dec 07, 2016 4:52 pm UTC

What is Amazon Go?
Amazon Go is a new kind of store with no checkout required. We created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. With our Just Walk Out Shopping experience, simply use the Amazon Go app to enter the store, take the products you want, and go! No lines, no checkout.

How does Amazon Go work?
Our checkout-free shopping experience is made possible by the same types of technologies used in self-driving cars: computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning. Our Just Walk Out technology automatically detects when products are taken from or returned to the shelves and keeps track of them in a virtual cart. When you’re done shopping, you can just leave the store. Shortly after, we’ll charge your Amazon account and send you a receipt.

Impressive but seems a bit gimmicky. Surely you could achieve much the same thing by tagging products and walking through a sensor.

Still, I imagine in 10-15 years this will be how most stores work.

link

morriswalters
Posts: 6550
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:21 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Wed Dec 07, 2016 5:11 pm UTC

I hope not. My family shops online and picks up the groceries at the curb without ever entering the store.

jewish_scientist
Posts: 554
Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2014 3:15 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby jewish_scientist » Wed Dec 07, 2016 5:28 pm UTC

I think this is another one of the new technologies that is awesome when it works and disastrous when it does not; what happens when a store closes having been payed $1,000 and having sold $2,000 of merchandise? Also, this basically makes shop-lifting impossible to prosecute.

commodorejohn
Posts: 878
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:21 pm UTC
Location: Placerville, CA
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Wed Dec 07, 2016 5:47 pm UTC

I mean, presumably the idea is that you wouldn't be able to get in the store without swiping in, but if anybody seriously buys that I've got a bridge they might be interested in.
"'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling."
- Bjarne Stroustrup
www.commodorejohn.com - in case you were wondering, which you probably weren't.

Sheikh al-Majaneen
Name Checks Out On Time, Tips Chambermaid
Posts: 1037
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 5:17 am UTC
Location: couldn't even find coffee in copenhagen

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Sheikh al-Majaneen » Thu Dec 08, 2016 1:00 am UTC

The worst part about it is, I'd say, the part where, as these spread, a lot of people who would be doing grocery shopping will lose the jobs that pay them the money to do it.

Plus removing even that little human interaction from grocery stores will make more people even more uncomfortable with social situations.

Why is this a good idea?

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:26 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:I hope not. My family shops online and picks up the groceries at the curb without ever entering the store.

At the curb of the store you mean? In 10-15 years most likely noone will leave the house to pick up online orders; it'll have been driven to your house or place of work by a driverless vehicle.

jewish_scientist wrote:I think this is another one of the new technologies that is awesome when it works and disastrous when it does not; what happens when a store closes having been payed $1,000 and having sold $2,000 of merchandise? Also, this basically makes shop-lifting impossible to prosecute.

Remember that new technologies don't have to be perfect to displace existing practices, they only have to be better. Stores currently lose about 1.4% in 'shrinkage' (ie. theft) so unless technical issues result in losses worse than that on average, rolling this out is a no brainer.

Also, you're mistaken about shop lifting being impossible to prosecute. If a bank error deposits too much money in your account you can be prosecuted if you don't return it. The same will be true if you walk out of a store with an item you don't get charged for. In both cases the legal obligation is on you to report the mistake the company has made.

(In practice though, unless you have a history of it, you may well be gifted the item as a goodwill gesture it's true.)

commodorejohn wrote:I mean, presumably the idea is that you wouldn't be able to get in the store without swiping in, but if anybody seriously buys that I've got a bridge they might be interested in.

I am not so sure. Software that tracks people walking inside casinos has been in use for many years, and this is just that on steroids.

Given that this tech is entirely visual-based, it'd be trivial for it to direct security staff to intercept people who fail to swipe in successfully. eg. Security could wander wearing Google Glasses which paint big red rings round people who bypassed entry.

The worst part about it is, I'd say, the part where, as these spread, a lot of people who would be doing grocery shopping will lose the jobs that pay them the money to do it.

Why is this a good idea?

It's a good idea for the same reason that all efficiency gains are good ideas: They make the world richer.

That makes us all richer just so long as the gains are shared out equally - eg. through a citizen's wage.
Last edited by elasto on Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:41 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

morriswalters
Posts: 6550
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:21 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:40 pm UTC

elasto wrote:At the curb of the store you mean? In 10-15 years most likely noone will leave the house to pick up online orders; it'll have been driven to your house or place of work by a driverless vehicle.
Well, maybe. But then again, why? The problem that we have, that it corrects, isn't getting the groceries to our house, it is the time that it takes to shop at a brick and mortar store. My wife picks up the groceries on the way home. And if you shop for a family, you are more likely to leave with a cart full, rather than a bag full. Unless the technology is simpler than it seems to be this seems to be, there seems to be a certain amount of overkill involved.

elasto
Posts: 3051
Joined: Mon May 10, 2010 1:53 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby elasto » Thu Dec 08, 2016 12:51 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:Well, maybe. But then again, why? The problem that we have, that it corrects, isn't getting the groceries to our house, it is the time that it takes to shop at a brick and mortar store. My wife picks up the groceries on the way home. And if you shop for a family, you are more likely to leave with a cart full, rather than a bag full. Unless the technology is simpler than it seems to be this seems to be, there seems to be a certain amount of overkill involved.

If there's a demand for it, I'm sure there could be lockers outside this store which pickers put shopping into. But I suspect there won't be much demand for that.

Home deliveries won't be done like they are now - where you have to book a timeslot and hang around for it to arrive. Your wife's phone will notify the store that she's begun her journey home, and her shopping will arrive soon after she does.

Yes it'll be a bit 'Orwellian' but convenience > all...

relevant smbc comic

morriswalters
Posts: 6550
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 12:21 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby morriswalters » Thu Dec 08, 2016 2:50 pm UTC

I'm not worried about giving up information. Amazon isn't solving any problems in this area that I need solved. My wife already goes by the store on her way from work. She doesn't want to spend an hour or so walking up and down the aisles of a store and all that goes with it. That's the problem I need solved.

And home delivery isn't new. I delivered groceries when I was 16. It was just pricier than a mega mart. And they are still hand delivered today. It will be more relevant to your generation or the next as car ownership drops, assuming that your time table isn't overly optimistic. However Your robo cars need to be cheap.

commodorejohn
Posts: 878
Joined: Thu Dec 10, 2009 6:21 pm UTC
Location: Placerville, CA
Contact:

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby commodorejohn » Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:08 pm UTC

elasto wrote:It's a good idea for the same reason that all efficiency gains are good ideas: They make the world richer.

That makes us all richer just so long as the gains are shared out equally - eg. through a citizen's wage.

Unless you're a checkout clerk...
"'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling."
- Bjarne Stroustrup
www.commodorejohn.com - in case you were wondering, which you probably weren't.

User avatar
sardia
Posts: 5562
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:39 am UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby sardia » Thu Dec 08, 2016 4:22 pm UTC

commodorejohn wrote:
elasto wrote:It's a good idea for the same reason that all efficiency gains are good ideas: They make the world richer.

That makes us all richer just so long as the gains are shared out equally - eg. through a citizen's wage.

Unless you're a checkout clerk...

Or a horse breeder. You went from having a massive market, to a niche for the wealthy. We've seen this story before, a lot of people are gonna get hurt from it. But it will still be better.

Sheikh al-Majaneen
Name Checks Out On Time, Tips Chambermaid
Posts: 1037
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 5:17 am UTC
Location: couldn't even find coffee in copenhagen

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby Sheikh al-Majaneen » Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:05 am UTC

commodorejohn wrote:
elasto wrote:It's a good idea for the same reason that all efficiency gains are good ideas: They make the world richer.

That makes us all richer just so long as the gains are shared out equally - eg. through a citizen's wage.

Unless you're a checkout clerk...

That's what elasto meant with the citizen's wage--there's been a lot more talk of universal basic income lately, mostly justified by this trend of eliminating jobs and replacing them with meth nothing at all.

The optimistic perspective about the elimination of jobs is by and large that it frees everyone to do what they want, but I expect that it would more resemble the background in the movie Advantageous or the rentier capitalism in the thought-exercise in Anti-Star Trek (and what I fear is the last future described in his essay, Four Futures).

sardia wrote:Or a horse breeder. You went from having a massive market, to a niche for the wealthy. We've seen this story before, a lot of people are gonna get hurt from it. But it will still be better.

I don't actually see how this is an improvement. It isn't replacing staffed supermarkets with the supermarket's analogue for an automobile, it is replacing staffed supermarkets with giant vending machines.

It's not better, it's just progress.
Last edited by Sheikh al-Majaneen on Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:50 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
PeteP
What the peck?
Posts: 1451
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2011 4:51 pm UTC

Re: The Thread To Remind Me We're Living In The Future

Postby PeteP » Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:49 am UTC

That standing in line in the annoying part of grocery shopping aside, the improvement of such things in general is that we don't need people to do the work anymore freeing them up to do other work. Our world would be very different if we didn't utterly decimate* the agricultural sector. At one point (imo) there will not be enough new work for humans anymore but the problem is resource allocation not the lack of jobs in itself. Though I worry that with many viewing the jobs as the main problem it will take even longer for the resource allocation part to be fixed than I expect. (And I expect it to take long and be really ugly for a while.)

*No I don't really care that the word meant something different once, no not even when the deci still indicates it.

Though the concept sounds invonvenient for people who either have no bank account or no smartphone, a group which is relatively small but exists.


Return to “News & Articles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Aceo and 13 guests