Police misbehavior thread

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby sardia » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:00 am UTC

DSenette wrote:a better fact....he's been fired

It's amazing what nationwide outcry and 3 video cameras can do for that black lady. Now if only we could get that for every oppressed minority in the country, racism would be solved.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:44 am UTC

sardia wrote:
DSenette wrote:a better fact....he's been fired

It's amazing what nationwide outcry and 3 video cameras can do for that black lady. Now if only we could get that for every oppressed minority in the country, racism would be solved.
Not a clean win.
Sheriff Lott said he expected that the student, who was arrested on a charge of disturbing the school, would still face prosecution. A lawyer for the student did not respond to a message on Wednesday.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Diadem » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:14 pm UTC

Is that wrong? If you get beaten up during an arrest, you deserve compensation for that, but you don't deserve to get off free for whatever you were arrested for.

*edit* I admit I haven't really followed this case so I have no idea what she was arrested for. If it's something minor it would seem logical to make dropping the charges part of the compensation.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:34 pm UTC

You wouldn't have to follow all the news, you could just read a couple posts in this thread.

She was violently arrested for calmly sitting in class after being asked to leave for chewing gum. Another student was arrested for standing up for her.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Diadem » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:39 pm UTC

I read that, but I had assumed there was more to the story.

You're saying that a school actually called the police because a student was chewing gum? And additionally you are claiming that the police responded seriously to such a call?

Nope, I'm not buying that. Not even in this mythological place called 'America' are people that crazy.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Oct 29, 2015 12:43 pm UTC

No one "called the police". The cop worked at the school.

Which is its own kind of fucked up, but in any case it might behoove you to know what you're talking about before next gracing us with your personal incredulity.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:02 pm UTC

Correct your facts, it appears that it was using her cellphone that started the fracas. The cop was a dick, the student only slightly less.
In the South Carolina case, a girl at Spring Valley High School defied a teacher’s instruction to stop using her phone in class and refused orders — first from the teacher, then from an administrator, and finally from a sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school — to stand up and leave the classroom.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby natraj » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:21 pm UTC

"only slightly less"? i how is "sitting quietly in class" only slightly worse than literally violently assaulting a child, my goodness.

anyway, the actual sequence of events was that the girl was using her cellphone BRIEFLY and then stopped using it. but because it's not allowed to use cellphones at all, even though she wasn't using it anymore, she was ordered to leave the classroom. she hadn't defied any instruction to stop using her phone, she had defied the instruction to leave the classroom. so the teacher called in the school cop on her, who proceeded to violently drag and throw her out of her seat as she sat in it quietly.

essentially, her infraction that is in morriswalter's mind nearly equivalent to actual violent assault was non-compliance with the teacher's order [to further screw up her education over a brief and minor transgression].

which is actually entirely normal in american schools; students get absurdly and out-of-proportionately penalized for all kinds of trivial things in ways that do nothing except ensure that they are missing more classtime and falling further behind, but GUESS WHAT disciplinary actions happens at a rate of 3-6x more for black students than for white students.

so when you have, first, putting police (who in and of themselves have been shown to be more likely to use violent force against black people) in all the schools as part of BOTH the security AND punitive systems there, and then teachers ALSO contributing to the disproportionate penalizing of black youth, you're going to end up with these kinds of situations where teachers call the cops on their students over things that are not even crimes, and then it turns INTO a crime because well now you're resisting a police officer instead of sassing your teacher.

it's all quite horrifying.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby KrytenKoro » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:37 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:Correct your facts, it appears that it was using her cellphone that started the fracas. The cop was a dick, the student only slightly less.
In the South Carolina case, a girl at Spring Valley High School defied a teacher’s instruction to stop using her phone in class and refused orders — first from the teacher, then from an administrator, and finally from a sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school — to stand up and leave the classroom.

According to students in the class, she was quiet and wasn't disturbing anyone. Without knowing -why- she was on the phone (emergency-based text from her family/doctor, perhaps? Or just a text from her friend?), it doesn't make sense to condemn her for refusing to immediately put down her phone, which could describe a situation as simple as "Please give me a minute, I need to finish this."

That being said, even if she was totally flaking from class, it does not excuse the officer's behavior in the least.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Grop » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:48 pm UTC

To be fair, just like Diadem I was assuming that school had called the police.

It may seem crazy to call the cops (or school cops in that case) for using a cell phone. On the other hand she was asked to leave and did not. If the school wants someone to leave their grounds, and they don't, I am not sure what they should do apart from asking the cops for some coercion.

(Which is not an excuse for disproportionate use of force by the cops).

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Diadem » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:59 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Which is its own kind of fucked up, but in any case it might behoove you to know what you're talking about before next gracing us with your personal incredulity.

You do realize that last sentence was tongue in cheek right? I mean I know sarcasm is hard to detect online, and maybe I should have made it clearer, but I thought that calling an entire continent fictional was a pretty clear give-away.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:04 pm UTC

natraj wrote:essentially, her infraction that is in morriswalter's mind nearly equivalent to actual violent assault was non-compliance with the teacher's order [to further screw up her education over a brief and minor transgression].
Yes. And no. I won't speak to the behavior before the point where we have data. What we know is that she whipped her cellphone out in class and used it. She was asked by the instructor to stand and leave the classroom. We can infer the she didn't care about the rest of the class. She, at this point, has effectively brought the class to a halt. Her continued refusal brought an administrator. And then a cop. And the assault. The cop has been fired. He paid a price for his stupidity. As he should have. She gets somewhat a pass because she is a juvenile, and by expectation prone to poor decision making. So I would expect the charges to be dropped. But it doesn't really change the fact that he couldn't have been a dick if she hadn't refused to comply. Perhaps I should have used the term self absorbed and entitled.

Was there racism involved. Yes. Would a white student have been handled differently. Maybe. Do cops need to be in schools. Absolutely not. Do I feel a lot of sympathy for her. No.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Grop » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:12 pm UTC

What exactly is a charge of disturbing school? Are there really some laws against that?

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:17 pm UTC

KrytenKoro wrote:
morriswalters wrote:Correct your facts, it appears that it was using her cellphone that started the fracas. The cop was a dick, the student only slightly less.
In the South Carolina case, a girl at Spring Valley High School defied a teacher’s instruction to stop using her phone in class and refused orders — first from the teacher, then from an administrator, and finally from a sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school — to stand up and leave the classroom.

According to students in the class, she was quiet and wasn't disturbing anyone. Without knowing -why- she was on the phone (emergency-based text from her family/doctor, perhaps? Or just a text from her friend?), it doesn't make sense to condemn her for refusing to immediately put down her phone, which could describe a situation as simple as "Please give me a minute, I need to finish this."

That being said, even if she was totally flaking from class, it does not excuse the officer's behavior in the least.
My understanding, though I haven't confirmed, that she had recently lost her mother, in which case even if it was a text from a friend it's totally understandable why emotional support took a moment of higher priority than strictly following all school rules.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby natraj » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:28 pm UTC

Grop wrote:On the other hand she was asked to leave and did not. If the school wants someone to leave their grounds, and they don't, I am not sure what they should do apart from asking the cops for some coercion.


in the abstract, this sounds entirely reasonable, until you extend it to its logical extrapolation (which i don't mean as a slippery slope argument, i mean it in exactly the way it is actually, currently, being used and enforced.)
as a society we have decided some things: first, that all children have a right to an education, second, that not only do they have this right, it is our societal responsibility to the point where we criminalize parents for failing to do their part to make this happen, and criminalize children for *not* being in school during the ages and times we say they should.
but then we increasingly also over-police them to the point where any number of minor tiny things can get them barred from the classroom and also in jail?
this is ridiculous and no, there does need to be a far more reasonable limit on schools blocking students who they deem unfit from receiving an education. we aren't talking about schools banning people for safety reasons -- and i would strongly argue that in cases like this, we are not even talking about schools banning them for being disruptive and standing in the way of other kids' education. when the *teacher* is the one stopping class to Make An Example of kids over utterly trivial nonsense, it is the teacher and not the student who "doesn't care about the rest of the class" as morriswalters says.
because if the teacher had cared as much about the education of both this girl *and* the rest of the class as they did about a power trip, none of this would have happened.
cuz you know what is WAY MORE disruptive than one student briefly checking their cell phone in class?
calling in the cops to violently forcibly remove them from class.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby PAstrychef » Thu Oct 29, 2015 2:49 pm UTC

After all, what could be worse than a student getting away with ignoring a command from authority? Chaos will immediately ensue!
If the teacher hadn't tried to force the position of control at all cost, this would be a nonevent.
If the student isn't physically assaulting anyone, the use of force is just wrong.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Grop » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:02 pm UTC

Well teachers order students to leave their class all the time, that may be viewed as disruptive to the class but takes a minute or two most of the time. Because most students just leave the class as demanded.

In this situation I am pretty sure that class was much disrupted when this student refused to move. I am not a teacher, and I have no idea how they are supposed to move on when a student is openly disobeying in front of the class.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:04 pm UTC

PAstrychef wrote:After all, what could be worse than a student getting away with ignoring a command from authority? Chaos will immediately ensue!
Probably not[/sarcasm]. Chaos is already there. From my link.
Mr. Canady said his group trains officers to first “remove the audience.”

“I would ask the school administrators to please excuse the other students and let them go out in the hall,” he said, and then talk calmly with the one left behind. “Simply ask the student, ‘What’s wrong, what’s going on, how can I help you?’ That’s a difference maker. Many times they just need somebody to listen to.”
This was actually my first thought. But it begs the question, when did cellphones become the mediator of students emotional problems? Why should the rest of the class have to move. And why are cops there. But this just reinforces my opinion of public schools. If I had young children they wouldn't be there.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Diadem » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:13 pm UTC

natraj wrote:and i would strongly argue that in cases like this, we are not even talking about schools banning them for being disruptive and standing in the way of other kids' education. when the *teacher* is the one stopping class to Make An Example of kids over utterly trivial nonsense

What?

No. Absolutely no. Refusing to leave class when you are ordered to is an very serious offence. Ordering someone out of the class is already an escalation (best used sparingly, but sometimes necessary), a punishment for repeated or especially serious disruptions of the class. A student refusing to leave is not just disrupting class, they are directly challenging the authority of the teacher. In a situation like that the teacher absolutely has no choice but to escalate. The alternative is permanently losing all authority over the entire class, which is functionally identical to "no more education for those kids until a new teacher is found". I've seen it happen once, back when I was in high school. A teacher backing down when a student refused to leave the class. Five minutes later everyone was openly talking in class, and when the teacher requested silence he was outright ignored. That class was a complete chaos for the rest of the year, and if I recall correctly the teacher left the school at the end of it.

Calling the cops is obviously an absurd response. We're in complete agreement there. But that doesn't mean that what this girl did isn't very serious. If something like this happens the school should probably contact the parents, even on a first offence, and if there is a pattern of behaviour like that suspension is entirely appropriate.

As to what kind of escalation is appropriate. Well, I think the advice morriswalter's quotes has the right idea. Dismiss the rest of the class, then talk to the student and figure out what's wrong. I think calling in the principle was a sub-optimal response from the teacher, but not a bad one. The principle however is the one who really screwed up by calling the cops.

PAstrychef wrote:After all, what could be worse than a student getting away with ignoring a command from authority? Chaos will immediately ensue!

Yes actually. You're saying that sarcastically, but yes, that is actually exactly what would immediately happen. Generally speaking it probably already happened. If as a teacher you're at the stage where students start to refuse punishments you've probably already lost your control over the class sometime previously.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby natraj » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:25 pm UTC

diadem, my point is that the teacher was in the wrong and simply powertripping in the first place for even ordering the student to leave class (that was the point at which they decided that their power trip was more important than the education of everyone involved.)

like, they could have simply given a reminder not to use cell phones in class, issued a warning rather than escalating (because kicking her out of class? ALREADY disproportionate escalation.)

and i have been a teacher of students of various ages (also teenagers! ) *somehow* i managed to deal with even insubordinate students without chaos constantly breaking out and ALSO without calling the cops on them.

yes, if a student is genuinely being disruptive or dangerous sometimes removing them from class is the correct thing to do but for something like this? no, that is just over the top.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby icanus » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:36 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:No. Absolutely no. Refusing to leave class when you are ordered to is an very serious offence.

A student refusing to leave when ordered to is serious, but not nearly as serious as a teacher arbitrarily ordering a student to leave to assert dominance when it's absolutely clear to everyone in the class that there was no need to do it.

School isn't a prison or the military. Teachers don't have divine authority - you maintain control by the consent of the pupils, by persuasion, and if you lose it it's pretty much always because you're being unreasonable (I say this both as a teacher and a former "problem" student).

There are any number of ways to deal with an infraction like gum-chewing or phone-checking that don't place you in a stand-off and don't further disrupt the class. "See me after" is a traditional favourite.
Diadem wrote:
PAstrychef wrote:After all, what could be worse than a student getting away with ignoring a command from authority? Chaos will immediately ensue!

Yes actually. You're saying that sarcastically, but yes, that is actually exactly what would immediately happen. Generally speaking it probably already happened. If as a teacher you're at the stage where students start to refuse punishments you've probably already lost your control over the class sometime previously.

And the best course of action is to demonstrate your impotence by forcing a confrontation?

Frankly, if you're at the point where you're giving orders rather than asking, you've pretty much lost the class already.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby KnightExemplar » Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:46 pm UTC

Calling the cops is obviously an absurd response. We're in complete agreement there. But that doesn't mean that what this girl did isn't very serious. If something like this happens the school should probably contact the parents, even on a first offence, and if there is a pattern of behaviour like that suspension is entirely appropriate.


A fair number of schools in my area have a reputation for extremely rowdy students. The worst schools have two or three "bouncers" assigned to them, to help pull disruptive kids out of classrooms. In my experience, these "bouncers" (what we kids called them) weren't official Police Officers, but were just security staff assigned to the school.

My personal high school did have an officer assigned however. Between drunk driving incidents, student pranks (ie: fake bomb threats on major test days), drugs (weed and adderall abuse were most common), and gangs being the norm in American Schools, the officer being assigned to the school really just made sense. My high school was considered pretty good for instance, and we still had a gang-related stabbing death take place during a football game. And again, I went to one of the highest rated (non-magnet) public high schools in the area, in a county that is rated in the top 50 school counties in America.

Schools with actual gang violence existed in the county. And there are even schools where knife violence was so common that they've installed metal detectors. Yes, Police are a part of American Schools.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:13 pm UTC

natraj wrote:yes, if a student is genuinely being disruptive or dangerous sometimes removing them from class is the correct thing to do but for something like this? no, that is just over the top.
You may or may not be right. Do you have any data other than press accounts? Prior history in that class, anything?

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Tyndmyr » Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:17 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:Correct your facts, it appears that it was using her cellphone that started the fracas. The cop was a dick, the student only slightly less.
In the South Carolina case, a girl at Spring Valley High School defied a teacher’s instruction to stop using her phone in class and refused orders — first from the teacher, then from an administrator, and finally from a sheriff’s deputy assigned to the school — to stand up and leave the classroom.


As a general rule, you shouldn't be on your cell phone in class, sure.

But that's normal kid misbehavior. Probably happens near constantly, given how pervasive cell phones are. The adults are supposed to be able to handle that in a reasonable fashion. Even in the case where physical action needs to be taken, as there is no actual danger, it should be minimal and not look like throwing someone to the ground.

Minor misbehaviors do not entitle one to act in absolutely any manner in response.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby car(e)less Stranger » Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:20 pm UTC

Get out of my head. :wink:
it seems the questions I registered for to ask, have already been asked an answered in the last hour.

So this is just a quick hello by a new guy from Austria (longtime lurker).

What exactly is a charge of disturbing school? Are there really some laws against that?


This hasn't really been answered and I'd like to know as well. Also what's the penalty for incurring a charge? A fine?

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 5:12 pm UTC

Here you go. The direct link SECTION 16-17-420. Disturbing schools; summary court jurisdiction.Image

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Oct 29, 2015 5:41 pm UTC

Diadem wrote:Refusing to leave class when you are ordered to is an very serious offence.
Just like "resisting arrest". Never mind whether the "order" (or arrest) was complete bullshit to start with.

morriswalters wrote:
natraj wrote:yes, if a student is genuinely being disruptive or dangerous sometimes removing them from class is the correct thing to do but for something like this? no, that is just over the top.
You may or may not be right. Do you have any data other than press accounts? Prior history in that class, anything?
You want data other than all the eyewitness accounts of the people who were actually there? And other than the three videos?

What kind of "data" would that even be, exactly?
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Dauric » Thu Oct 29, 2015 5:47 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:You want data other than all the eyewitness accounts of the people who were actually there? And other than the three videos?

What kind of "data" would that even be, exactly?


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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:03 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:What kind of "data" would that even be, exactly?
Prior history, her mothers status, the why of her being in foster care. The videos tell what the cop did wrong, but not what happened before the cop got there. In other words the total picture. It is quite possible that I am hostage to my bias. To beat back that bias I use data. I don't like eyewitness accounts because they aren't reliable. Cameras are. But they don't show enough of the context. People didn't start recording before things went to hell.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Tyndmyr » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:07 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:What kind of "data" would that even be, exactly?
Prior history, her mothers status, the why of her being in foster care. The videos tell what the cop did wrong, but not what happened before the cop got there. In other words the total picture. It is quite possible that I am hostage to my bias. To beat back that bias I use data. I don't like eyewitness accounts because they aren't reliable. Cameras are. But they don't show enough of the context. People didn't start recording before things went to hell.


Uh, gonna guess that the cop that got called in didn't know "her mothers status" and god knows what else.

If he didn't need that information to decide if he should slam her to the floor, then you don't need it to decide if he was wrong.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:08 pm UTC

Yeah, also what does her mother's status or her reasons for being in foster care have to do with whether the teacher was reasonable to try to kick her out of class for a minute on a phone?

Do you also want to know about her father's fidelity or criminal record, as people did with Tamir Rice?
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby elasto » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:16 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:People didn't start recording before things went to hell.

Do you see the irony in expecting other students to be openly brandishing their cellphones when that's exactly what kicked off the cop violence..? Of course they didn't start recording until things went to hell!

You are going to have to judge if the passive resistance being shown was enough to warrant the violence, or if another approach would have been more productive in the long run - especially given the fear and hatred these pupils will now have towards cops going forwards.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:41 pm UTC

elasto wrote:Do you see the irony in expecting other students to be openly brandishing their cellphones when that's exactly what kicked off the cop violence..?
Not in particular. Everybody was so involved by then I doubt that anybody saw, much less gave much attention to it. I also notice that no started recording prior to that point.
elasto wrote:You are going to have to judge if the passive resistance being shown was enough to warrant the violence,
No I don't. There isn't anything to judge. I'm satisfied that he was fired and that Justice may investigate. My point lies elsewhere. In the nature of, was she distressed or merely a brat. Everyone is painting a picture and I, in particular, want more colors to paint with.
gmalivuk wrote:Yeah, also what does her mother's status or her reasons for being in foster care have to do with whether the teacher was reasonable to try to kick her out of class for a minute on a phone?
Well, I don't know. The lawyer she has put it in the public domain so I guess he has some kind of point, much like he did when listing her physical status. Given that he is a lawyer and this is playing out in public do you think it a bid to garner sympathy perhaps? And set up the inevitable lawsuit, or the Justice Department inquiry. You on the other hand suggested that her mother had died. Did she? And if she didn't why did you post it?
gmalivuk wrote:My understanding, though I haven't confirmed, that she had recently lost her mother, in which case even if it was a text from a friend it's totally understandable why emotional support took a moment of higher priority than strictly following all school rules.
And given this post why would you question me as to why I would want to know? I call that business as usual for you. On the other hand it may be true, and that her distress is greater because the death of her mother left her with no family, thus her being in foster care. Any guesses?
gmalivuk wrote:Do you also want to know about her father's fidelity or criminal record, as people did with Tamir Rice?
Not unless you throw them out as an excuse or justification.
Tyndmyr wrote:If he didn't need that information to decide if he should slam her to the floor, then you don't need it to decide if he was wrong.
I'm not talking to him, and we've already decided he's wrong.

KrytenKoro
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby KrytenKoro » Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:53 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:I'm not talking to him, and we've already decided he's wrong.

You started this inquest by saying that natraj "may or may not be wrong" about whether the teacher's demand and the officer's actions were over the top, saying that you needed this data to make a decision.

yes, if a student is genuinely being disruptive or dangerous sometimes removing them from class is the correct thing to do but for something like this? no, that is just over the top.

You may or may not be right. Do you have any data other than press accounts? Prior history in that class, anything?


If you're now saying that you already agree that the officer's actions were over the top, what question, exactly, are you trying to answer with that data? Is it whether the teacher's demand was reasonable?
From the elegant yelling of this compelling dispute comes the ghastly suspicion my opposition's a fruit.

morriswalters
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 7:28 pm UTC

KrytenKoro wrote:If you're now saying that you already agree that the officer's actions were over the top, what question, exactly, are you trying to answer with that data? Is it whether the teacher's demand was reasonable?
Yes.

car(e)less Stranger
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby car(e)less Stranger » Thu Oct 29, 2015 7:29 pm UTC

morriswalters wrote:Here you go. The direct link SECTION 16-17-420. Disturbing schools; summary court jurisdiction


ouch, up to 90 days in jail or an up to thousand dollar fine, that's hefty.
Any idea why this law is on the books (since 1919 in some form or another it seems, if I'm reading that right)?
Surely there must some other way but to threaten pupils or their parents with fines and jail time?

I've looked into the Austrian compulsory school law (only valid up to the equivalent of junior high I guess?) and only when a pupil has a rather long history (up to 14 weeks if all time limits are used up) of misconduct a charge can be filed. The sentence if there is a conviction is up to 440€ or 2 weeks jail time (for the parent(s)). iirc that last part was only added fairly recently to reduce skipping school, like that will help.

If you're in school voluntarily (from high school on) I guess you're getting expelled, but certainly not for using a phone or defying a teacher in class. Criminal charges for disrupting the lesson are, unless you are committing a serious crime, apart from behaving like an adolescent, entirely out of the question. Removal by force from class ditto

In the penal code I've found nothing pertaining to misconduct in school.

Anyway, forgive the off-topic post, I know this thread is about the misconduct of police and not that of teenagers. If any of you got answers to my questions please contact me by pm to not put this thread any further off-topic.

Well maybe something good will come out of this and that law goes the way of the Dodo

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LaserGuy
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby LaserGuy » Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:12 pm UTC

Vacationing couple in Honolulu violently arrested, jailed, stuck living on the street while awaiting trial because they were forced to spend all of their vacation money on bail. For the crime of kissing while lesbian.

Their case was immediately dropped by the prosecutor when they finally had their court date. The couple is currently suing the officer and the Honolulu police department.

speising
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby speising » Thu Oct 29, 2015 10:26 pm UTC

What the article unfortunately doesn't tell is the charge which was laid against them. I'd really like to know that. Some judge had to set this 12000$ bail for them.

morriswalters
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby morriswalters » Thu Oct 29, 2015 11:15 pm UTC

I believe it was felonious assault of an officer. One of them kicked him. I will never be able to unread "for the crime of kissing while lesbian". I hope they win lots of money.

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sardia
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby sardia » Fri Oct 30, 2015 1:09 am UTC

morriswalters wrote:I believe it was felonious assault of an officer. One of them kicked him. I will never be able to unread "for the crime of kissing while lesbian". I hope they win lots of money.

I thought Hawaii was more liberal. Why is it against the law?


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