Police misbehavior thread

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juststrange
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby juststrange » Fri Jun 15, 2012 1:32 pm UTC

http://www.abc2news.com/dpp/news/crime_checker/baltimore_county_crime/victims-mother-says-off-duty-officer-chased-down-the-wrong-man

Teens bang on officers door (I've heard more recent radio reports it was a thrown rock), off duty cop chases them, apprehends one who starts fighting, somewhere in there the teen dies of asphxiation. Family of teen says he wasn't even involved in the stone throwing, just happened to be in the area at that time (but who knows).

The issue I have, if you chase someone down, sans calling for backup, and apprehend them, then what? If you don't have cuffs, they just struggle with you until backup arrives, if you called. The way most officers restrain folks resisting violently prior to cuffing is to kneel on the back. This could easily asphyxiate someone if the duration is long enough. Maybe he was just looking to give the kids "a talkin' to" and it escalated when the fight started. I don't know. Seems a bad situation all around.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Fri Jun 15, 2012 3:07 pm UTC

Yikes! Without the details it's hard to understand what really went wrong, but that's just sad. According to the off-duty cop's story, he definitely wasn't trying to kill the kid (why do CPR), but you would hope that cops would be better at not accidentally committing homicide than your average person. And the fact that witnesses say this kid wasn't even one of the people he meant to chase down just makes this sadder.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Nordic Einar » Fri Jun 15, 2012 4:07 pm UTC

I'm a bit biased, but ya gotta love the MPD

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/cri ... ml?hpid=z6

Darehshori also cited the “re­victimization” of women, telling Lanier that “detectives regularly treat victims in a dismissive or insensitive manner, adding to their trauma and undermining the possibility that their perpetrator will be brought to justice.”

The behavior included “questioning survivors’ credibility; actively discouraging victims from reporting or providing forensic evidence; threatening victims with prosecution if they are found to be lying; asking victim-blaming or inappropriate questions; telling victims that their stories are not serious enough to investigate; and failing to keep victims informed of progress on their cases,” Darehshori wrote.

In a June 8 written response to Human Rights Watch, Lanier said she agreed with many of the group’s recommendations for improving the way sexual-assault cases are handled.


(Lanier being D.C.'s just splendid Chief of Police)

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Chen » Fri Jun 15, 2012 4:53 pm UTC

If we believe the police chief, actions had already been taken to resolve a lot of the issues proposed. I guess we need to wait and see if the report show evidence that those changes did or didn't help.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Nordic Einar » Sat Jun 16, 2012 12:16 am UTC

If we believe the police chief (hint: we don't) the MPD would have a 117% murder closure rate, there were no murders of trans* women in the last year that were hate crimes, they can't discipline officers who attack trans* folks because "the union won't let them", and also that we're the trans* friendliest city in the district.

"We already fixed shit" is basically Lanier's go-to line.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby lutzj » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:33 am UTC

Nordic Einar wrote:they can't discipline officers who attack trans* folks because "the union won't let them"


This can actually be a huge problem. Police officers are famously very willing to close ranks to protect one another from disciplinary action (or, heaven forbid, criminal prosecution), whether the charges in question are legitimate or not.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Nordic Einar » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:39 am UTC

I think you misunderstand me (or that I've miscommunicated.) I understand the blue code of silence - I work pretty much constantly with police, and it influences almost every one of my interactions with them.

I'm commenting, more, on the ridiculousness of a union contract that makes it literally against the law to comment on disciplinary measures. I also question whether or not it's true, since the MPD Brass have a long habit of kicking the can down the road as a means of avoiding pressure.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby lutzj » Sat Jun 23, 2012 3:51 am UTC

Nordic Einar wrote:I'm commenting, more, on the ridiculousness of a union contract that makes it literally against the law to comment on disciplinary measures.


Well, a myopically self-protective police culture begets insanely self-protective police unions. Police unions tend to be very politically powerful, and then you can get crap like this in the union contracts.

ninja edit: And you're right that it's quite possible that the police chief is just making the whole thing up. Either way, cops protecting cops.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Nordic Einar » Sat Jun 23, 2012 4:24 am UTC

Unfortunate truth, there.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby emceng » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:35 pm UTC

http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/06/30/2 ... -wont.html

This is one of my biggest issues with police forces, and the union system in general. They protect their members as much as possible, even in the face of repeated law and rule breaking.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:50 pm UTC

emceng wrote:http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/06/30/2876652/the-south-florida-cop-who-wont.html

This is one of my biggest issues with police forces, and the union system in general. They protect their members as much as possible, even in the face of repeated law and rule breaking.

This is a good example of "if someone really wants to be a cop, that's worrying." I liked
He brought the chief a plate of cookies and the chief agreed to let him work as a volunteer reserve officer at night — without pay.


There's a lot of other interesting quotes in the article.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Arrian » Fri Jul 13, 2012 2:36 pm UTC

Ever notice that UPS handles dogs, the Post Office handles dogs with mace, and the police are so afraid that they have to shoot dogs? What kind of lack of proportion, common sense and human decency brings you to this: Henrico police shoot pet as they notify family of son's homicide.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Fri Jul 13, 2012 3:05 pm UTC

Arrian wrote:Ever notice that UPS handles dogs, the Post Office handles dogs with mace, and the police are so afraid that they have to shoot dogs? What kind of lack of proportion, common sense and human decency brings you to this: Henrico police shoot pet as they notify family of son's homicide.

Does it make it worse that it was the victim's pet?
a dog that family members said belonged to Ricky Ellerbe, who was found dead near Cool Lane.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby K-R » Fri Jul 13, 2012 5:56 pm UTC


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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:11 pm UTC


Isn't that the same news story? Love the Screwtape letters reference, though, even though he does go a bit off of character.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby folkhero » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:21 pm UTC

Роберт wrote:

Isn't that the same news story? Love the Screwtape letters reference, though, even though he does go a bit off of character.

Scroll down.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:26 pm UTC

folkhero wrote:
Роберт wrote:

Isn't that the same news story? Love the Screwtape letters reference, though, even though he does go a bit off of character.

Scroll down.

I didn't realize that was just one of many articles with the "war on dogs" tag.

Who else liked the one where they
(possible trigger)
Spoiler:
shot a family pet with hollow points while a three year old girl was sitting at the table that the dog was underneath
Last edited by Роберт on Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:28 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Chen » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:26 pm UTC

I'm curious as to what they should do if a dog charges up to them though. Pepper spray it? Taser? Hope it doesn't jump on them?

From http://www.nbc12.com/story/19004485/fam ... lative-dog

Stricken with grief, Latoya ran outside her home. She said one of the officers followed, but the family's pit bull, Tiger, charged at him.

"The dog never jumped on him, but he (the police officer) just took out his gun and shot him," said Latoya.

Latoya said she understands why the policeman fired. "…If a dog came charging at me, I'd defend myself," she added.


Now whether this is careful editing of what she said or actually what she meant I don't know. But somehow it doesn't seem like some of the other cases where Police just wantonly kill people's animals.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Qaanol » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:33 pm UTC

Chen wrote:I'm curious as to what they we should do if a dog charges up to them us though. Pepper spray it? Taser? Hope it doesn't jump on them us?

Fixed.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Chen » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:57 pm UTC

Qaanol wrote:
Chen wrote:I'm curious as to what they we should do if a dog charges up to them us though. Pepper spray it? Taser? Hope it doesn't jump on them us?

Fixed.


Fine, doesn't change my question. What do you do if a dog charges at you? Having been attacked by a stranger's dog once in the past I certainly wouldn't think twice about shooting one if I felt threatened. Now that said I don't have a gun or any other weapon I carry around so in all likelihood I would personally need to wait until it either attacked me or didn't. Which, from experience, means you're pretty fucked if it decides to attack (obviously depending on the type of dog).

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby iamspen » Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:00 pm UTC

But police ought to be trained to handle such situations without having to immediately resort to shooting the dog. After all, it's not uncommon for dogs to be uncomfortable with strangers, and most of the time, an officer is not a welcome visitor in a home, which adds to the discomfort. Us regular non-cop folks shouldn't expect to walk into that situation on a semi-regular basis, but a cop should.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Qaanol » Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:01 pm UTC

In any case, this whole situation provides yet another reason why police officers should have a video camera and microphone built into their uniforms, with the requirement that those devices must be recording whenever the officer is on duty, and the footage must be available in any relevant case, and should enter the public domain after a reasonable duration, such as 2 years.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby folkhero » Fri Jul 13, 2012 7:02 pm UTC

Chen wrote:I'm curious as to what they should do if a dog charges up to them though. Pepper spray it? Taser? Hope it doesn't jump on them?
Arrian wrote:Ever notice that UPS handles dogs, the Post Office handles dogs with mace, and the police are so afraid that they have to shoot dogs?
folkhero wrote:Mail carriers, gas meter readers, census takers and the like are all able to deal with people's dogs without shooting them. I think police officers should be forced to take classes from some of them to figure out how it's possible to interact with an animal without murdering it.

For as much as police and police supporters go on about how brave they are and how well trained they are, they sure seem to botch dog interactions all the time. The thing is, shooting a dog isn't just a tragedy for the owners, it's also bad police work. To police an area properly, the police need the respect and trust of the population or the people won't report crimes, work with investigators or serve as state's witness. When a population starts to fear or resent their police, the us vs. them mentality grows, snitches get stitches, and alternative protection forces (i.e. street gangs) spring up to fill the actual or perceived void.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Princess Marzipan » Tue Jul 17, 2012 1:57 am UTC

And of course, they're apt to shoot humans as well.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby TheGrammarBolshevik » Tue Jul 17, 2012 2:10 am UTC

The guy was an innocent victim of the police's mistake, no doubt about that. And it was perfectly reasonable for him to have a gun in hand when he came to the door. But it's a stretch to call it a slight provocation.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Роберт » Tue Jul 17, 2012 3:51 pm UTC

Princess Marzipan wrote:And of course, they're apt to shoot humans as well.

Officials said the deputies did not identify themselves because of safety reasons.

Good thinking, eh, guys?
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby engr » Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:49 am UTC

folkhero wrote: To police an area properly, the police need the respect and trust of the population or the people won't report crimes, work with investigators or serve as state's witness.


I strongly suspect that in high-crime areas, the better police will do their job, the more they will be hated. If most residents know someone who is, or was, involved with some criminal activity, they will not cooperate. If your father was in a gang and your cousin is serving time for drug trade, you will hate police precisely because they do their jobs.

folkhero wrote:and alternative protection forces (i.e. street gangs) spring up to fill the actual or perceived void


Because nothing says "we'll protect you" like drug trade, racketeering, and drive-by shootings...
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Lucrece » Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:39 am UTC

Hating police is also a nifty way to dodge jury duty. It was hilarious to see the judge and prosecution's face when a lady quite plainly said "I fucking hate the police. They arrested my husband." in the courtroom as the jury was being selected from the panel.

Yet, in Miami, FL, cops have rightfully earned their bad reputation. Can't say I trust police when my brother was arrested for skipping school, and my $160 calculator he had borrowed for class disappeared after his bookpack was confiscated, and when he was released one of the officials told us "you can file a complaint, but it won't go anywhere since we review those complaints". Who knew, the police being in charge of reviewing its own misconduct is some hilarious, sick twisted idea that somehow citizens have allowed for so long.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby folkhero » Thu Jul 19, 2012 10:48 am UTC

engr wrote:
folkhero wrote: To police an area properly, the police need the respect and trust of the population or the people won't report crimes, work with investigators or serve as state's witness.


I strongly suspect that in high-crime areas, the better police will do their job, the more they will be hated. If most residents know someone who is, or was, involved with some criminal activity, they will not cooperate. If your father was in a gang and your cousin is serving time for drug trade, you will hate police precisely because they do their jobs.

So instead of trying to repair the adversarial relationship between a community and a police force, the police should just declare open season on pets?

engr wrote:
folkhero wrote:and alternative protection forces (i.e. street gangs) spring up to fill the actual or perceived void


Because nothing says "we'll protect you" like drug trade, racketeering, and drive-by shootings...
When institutions like the police fail a group of people, they will look for alternatives wherever they can find them.

But lets not kid ourselves, the government profits from the alcohol and tobacco trade in the form of high sin taxes; some states even put themselves in the position of monopoly liquor sellers. Income and property taxes looks quite a lot like an extortion racket the tax collectors if don't have legitimacy from the consent of the people. The government won't shot you in a drive by, but they might knock on your door in the middle of the night and then shoot you if you take the precaution of arming yourself. And if you're brown and in another county they might drop a bomb on you from a flying robot. I'm not saying that these things are exactly the same, but I do think it's fascinating to see how people set up their own illegitimate institutions and societies that parallel the legitimate ones that they feel (rightly or wrongly) left out of.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Arrian » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:04 pm UTC

engr wrote:I strongly suspect that in high-crime areas, the better police will do their job, the more they will be hated. If most residents know someone who is, or was, involved with some criminal activity, they will not cooperate. If your father was in a gang and your cousin is serving time for drug trade, you will hate police precisely because they do their jobs.


I imagine a lot of that depends on what police define as their job and how they go about it. If your uncle is in prison because he sold a dime bag to an undercover cop who was smoking up with him (committing a lesser crime in order to gain evidence of a greater crime is legal, after all!) but nobody ever found who killed that little girl doing her homework in a drive by (despite the fact that everyone knows who did it, including the folks that same undercover cop was hanging out with.) Then yes, the better the police do at their job, the less people will like them.

If you define police doing their job by arresting lawbreakers without regard to protecting the public, you'll get results like arresting grandmothers for possessing drugs after searching her house on the pretext of "checking for gas leaks." Or when you continue to practice an aggressive "stop and frisk" policy that's been ruled unconstitutional just to increase your arrest count, yes people will dislike you for "doing a better job." If your actions, such as always standing on the 5th Amendment and refusing to take a breathalyzer, are in direct opposition to how you tell others to act, yes they will dislike you for doing your job.

On the other hand, if you get out of your patrol car and interact with people without forcing them to submit to you, if you use your discretion and common sense to overlook a minor infraction when asking a person about a major incident (there's no legal protection for a person to report a major crime when that report exposes their participation in a lesser crime,) if you focus your enforcement efforts on dangerous activity rather than easy to detect activity, then maybe people won't resent you so much when you do your job. They won't always like you, the community might not always like you, but they're far more likely to respect and cooperate with you than when you physically threaten them but "fear for your life" every time a dog barks at you.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby The Great Hippo » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:09 pm UTC

The police's job is to serve and protect the public. That is priority # 1. Everything else is secondary to this task.

This cannot be done without the public's consent. It's impossible. So garnering trust--creating trust--is an integral part of a police officer's job.

Therefore, things that simultaneously diminish trust and do not increase public safety represent decisions counter to a police officer's primary task. When police are doing their job right, they are either increasing trust--or sacrificing trust only because the alternative is to endanger the public. When they're doing it wrong, they're sacrificing trust at no gain (or even at a loss) to public safety.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Chen » Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:19 pm UTC

The Great Hippo wrote:Therefore, things that simultaneously diminish trust and do not increase public safety represent decisions counter to a police officer's primary task. When police are doing their job right, they are either increasing trust--or sacrificing trust only because the alternative is to endanger the public. When they're doing it wrong, they're sacrificing trust at no gain (or even at a loss) to public safety.


The problem that was presented though was the lack of trust they get even when they're doing it right. This is more human nature than anything else though. No one likes to be punished even if they "deserve" it. People are certainly going to spin things their way even if the cops were doing everything right.

Clearly they need to also stop doing things WRONG because that also degrades trust as you said. In neighborhoods where crime is part of everyday life, police are going to be the enemy regardless of how well they're doing their jobs.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Tyndmyr » Thu Jul 26, 2012 3:56 pm UTC

One notable thing about police/dog interactions is they're generally unplanned. The owner usually knows what time of day mailman/UPS folks tend to come by, and can take steps to minimize conflict. When the police decide they're coming in...they don't always ask permission first, and it's certainly not something a reasonable person could have prepared for beforehand. So, if they're refusing to allow people to restrain the dog/calm 'em down when they show up...it's almost certainly going to end up confrontational.

Not sure I see what public need is being served by this attitude.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Zcorp » Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:17 am UTC

Chen wrote:The problem that was presented though was the lack of trust they get even when they're doing it right.

The idea was proposed, there wasn't anything to back up the claim though. In the States we have significant evidence about various things that our police are doing wrong. Much of that involves enforcing laws that are wrong and hurt the public such as our traffic laws (especially our fatally low speed limits) and drug laws.

Enforcing laws such as these isn't doing it right. When the people we empower to protect us don't demonstrate they understand the effects of the laws they enforce it is quite difficult to trust them. Even if their job is to enforce these laws and doing so is often what would be considered 'right.'

This is more human nature than anything else though. No one likes to be punished even if they "deserve" it. People are certainly going to spin things their way even if the cops were doing everything right.
Do you work in prisons or as a social worker? You sound like someone who has no experience with people at all. People react in a many many different ways and it largely relates to how they are treated. That cops are seen as a force to punish instead of a force to protect is a large part of why people don't trust them.

Worse is that even when you think you can trust them and possibly should trust them almost always talking with them will only lead to opening you to punishment. Not even through the fault of the specific officer you are speaking with but because of the system they are forced to work in and have shown essentially zero interest in trying to make less broken and corrupt.

Clearly they need to also stop doing things WRONG because that also degrades trust as you said. In neighborhoods where crime is part of everyday life, police are going to be the enemy regardless of how well they're doing their jobs.
In neighborhoods where crime is not a part of everyday life they still enforce laws that get people killed. When the majority of them seem so oblivious of what their job should be and the disastrous effect of many of the laws they enforce and then express no interest changing them there is really little reason to trust them they are capable of the job.



Also, the Anaheim riots haven't been brought up yet it seems.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻ » Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:39 am UTC

The Anaheim riots are things I have heard mentioned now twice, that includes this thread, in my everyday media absorption. Granted, I've been working a lot and dealing with non-internet things, thereby reducing my newsmedia, but Still, it seems here on the other side of the US the news is quiet on that.
Basically thanks for bringing it up, I at least am going to learn something.
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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Chen » Mon Jul 30, 2012 3:18 am UTC

Zcorp wrote:
Chen wrote:The problem that was presented though was the lack of trust they get even when they're doing it right.

The idea was proposed, there wasn't anything to back up the claim though. In the States we have significant evidence about various things that our police are doing wrong. Much of that involves enforcing laws that are wrong and hurt the public such as our traffic laws (especially our fatally low speed limits) and drug laws.

Enforcing laws such as these isn't doing it right. When the people we empower to protect us don't demonstrate they understand the effects of the laws they enforce it is quite difficult to trust them. Even if their job is to enforce these laws and doing so is often what would be considered 'right.'


I dont disagree with any of this. I also dont see what it has to do with what I said. Lets say we agree on them doing something "right" (like say arresting someone, in a non-violent manner, who they saw shoot someone else). In such a case I cannot imagine the shooter is going to consider the police as "good guys". Frankly that was the only point I was making. The rest of your post just went off on a tangent about how police are doing things "wrong" in various ways. Which is exactly what I condemned in my last paragraph.

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Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Zcorp » Mon Jul 30, 2012 6:27 am UTC

Chen wrote:I dont disagree with any of this. I also dont see what it has to do with what I said. Lets say we agree on them doing something "right" (like say arresting someone, in a non-violent manner, who they saw shoot someone else). In such a case I cannot imagine the shooter is going to consider the police as "good guys". Frankly that was the only point I was making. The rest of your post just went off on a tangent about how police are doing things "wrong" in various ways. Which is exactly what I condemned in my last paragraph.

What you aren't understanding is that what you call a tangent isn't one. Lets say that in this example the shooter is entirely in the wrong ethically, and the officers in question did everything reasonable to act as ethically as possible.

What does the perception of the shooter in this case have to do with the perception of the public as a whole with the police? The trust they have in their ability to protect and serve them? I'd also argue that very frequently people view themselves as a threat to society or other people and that being that thread makes them the 'bad guy.'

Because of how bad the system is, how bad the cops are at caring about ethics, previous behavior of police and the general distrust they have created in our society carries over to this situation. As well as the generally not transparent behavior of the police they destroy any trust they might have when they do things 'right.'

When people can't tell when the police are doing things 'right' and pretty much every experience they have with police the police are enforcing bad laws you certainly can't describe them as 'good guys' just people with power who sometimes, often through accident as the police populace doesn't show they understand ethics as a whole, use that power ethically.

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Lucrece
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Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 12:01 am UTC

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby Lucrece » Mon Jul 30, 2012 7:10 am UTC

I've seen shows where it wasn't uncommon for police to comment that they hoped the perps learned from jail time to stop breaking laws. Because congregating with violent offenders who prey on each other and the guards/prison wardens don't give a fuck is such a magnificent way to turn out functional human beings post-prison. Then there's also people who offend again because they've grown used to a structure that feeds and houses them, whereas when they are released, no measures are taken to integrate them back into society via jobs, affordable housing, and getting them involved in the right social circles instead of going right back to the criminal element.

They might give you a few classes in prison, but once you're out it's not like you have someone making sure you land on your feet and continue to do so.
Belial wrote:That's charming, Nancy, but all I hear when you talk is a bunch of yippy dog sounds.

engr
Posts: 322
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:08 am UTC

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby engr » Wed Aug 01, 2012 4:32 am UTC

Zcorp wrote: Much of that involves enforcing laws that are wrong and hurt the public such as our traffic laws (especially our fatally low speed limits) and drug laws.


I used to live in Russia during 1990's which weren't exactly the most crime-free time (to put it mildly). One of the reasons the public (or, at least, part of the public) really distrusted police was because it was not enforcing drug laws well enough and drugs became a huge problem after the collapse of the USSR. The common sentiment was "these bastard cops know who sells drugs and don't do anything".
If the cops in the US will stop enforcing dug laws, then they will be despised by anti-drug crowd, and for a good reason. Regardless what you think about drugs, refusing to perform your job duties because you personally disagree with them is wrong. You don't enlist in the military and then say "you know what, I'm refusing to be deployed at **** because this war is unjust". You don't become a judge and then refuse to wed an interracial couple because you personally believe that interracial marriage is morally wrong. You don't get hired in an abortion clinic and then refuse to perform your job duties because you are pro-life. You don't become a park ranger and then refuse to shoot deer to control their population because you are pro-animal rights.
Do what's in your job description or quit.

In the States we have significant evidence about various things that our police are doing wrong.


Because everything police does falls under scrutiny, whether on or off-duty. A crime, once committed by a police officer, even off-duty, is going to be all over the news. This will create the perception of police misbehavior being more common than it is. This is similar to how nuclear energy is feared by the public because a nuclear accident which killed no one will be all over the news because "Oh me yarm it's nyukelar!!!" while numerous deadly accidents at coal mines are like "meh, whatever".
I knew a police officer who was accused of beating his girlfriend, while off-duty (his story was that she was drunk and was taking a swing at him, so he physically restrained her); she called cops, they arrested him; charges got dropped, but he was still fired, and an organization he was a member of, while off-duty, was basically disbanded. If he wasn't a cop, how much coverage would that story get?
If misconduct by, say, engineers was covered as well as police misconduct, people would be fucking terrified of us.
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions. Gilbert K. Chesterton

engr
Posts: 322
Joined: Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:08 am UTC

Re: Police misbehavior thread

Postby engr » Wed Aug 01, 2012 4:36 am UTC

Lucrece wrote:I've seen shows where it wasn't uncommon for police to comment that they hoped the perps learned from jail time to stop breaking laws. Because congregating with violent offenders who prey on each other and the guards/prison wardens don't give a fuck is such a magnificent way to turn out functional human beings post-prison.


While recidivism rates are high, many criminals do stop after serving their terms. Not to say that prison system is great, but operand conditioning can work miracles. If nothing else, at least the bad guys will not hurt the general public while in prison, and that's the sentiment I heard more often ("I know I will see him again, but at least I put him off the street for a couple months").
Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions. Gilbert K. Chesterton


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