Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

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0range
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Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Fri Feb 20, 2009 5:51 pm UTC

I'm going to be studying there for two years starting in July, anyone else?
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby KOSMOSX7 » Thu Feb 26, 2009 3:20 pm UTC

I'm so envious of you right now. How the hell did you get in?

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Fri Feb 27, 2009 8:49 pm UTC

I attended DLI from 2002-2005. The place is fucking fantastic.

I studied Russian, you should let us know what language you're going to be studying once you have been assigned to it.

Which branch of the military are you in?

KOSMOSX7: First you have to pass the ASVAB (if you can't pass that test, you probably cannot use the internet either). Next, if you meet the requirements for the military, you need to request and pass the hardest test ever (DLAB, Defense Language Aptitude Battery). If you score well on the DLAB, you need to be patient while you're drooled over by the guy at MEPS, try to get him not to ship you off that day, and figure out what kind of sizeable bonus you want (in 2002 it was money added to the GI Bill or $15,000. The GI Bill is tax free, so I suggest that.

Either way, 0range is a lucky lucky kid, he's about to be in a place where there are thousands of people with very high verbal intelligence potentials.
Also, he will not be the smartest person in the room for the next couple of years.

Chad

(someday I will have a cool signature, until then, not so much.)

EDITED: I'm on percs right now, I'll post back later with some details when I'm sober and not in severe pain.
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby KOSMOSX7 » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:43 pm UTC

Chad.Boudreau wrote:If you score well on the DLAB, you need to be patient while you're drooled over by the guy at MEPS, try to get him not to ship you off that day, and figure out what kind of sizeable bonus you want (in 2002 it was money added to the GI Bill or $15,000. The GI Bill is tax free, so I suggest that.

I never got as far as the DLAB. My paperwork was good, my ASVAB was a 96, and I had my heart set on working in Navy intel as a CTI. The recruiter didn't have to sell me on anything. I actually told him to drop all talk about money, cause that wasn't why I was signing up. My thought was, I get by on so little now, whatever the Navy plans on giving me has got to be better. In retrospect, it sounds kind of dumb, but that's the kind of idiot that I am.

So naturally, my recruiter was ecstatic, but he overlooked some important things while trying to squeeze me into that month's quota. So after spending an entire effin' day at physical, followed by the, as you said, getting drooled over by the Navy MEPS from the nuc program, I had to *leave* cause medical thought a UTI was good enough to DQ me.

I still don't know how to feel about it.

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Sat Mar 14, 2009 12:37 am UTC

Oops, I should check this more often I suppose.

KOSMOSX7 wrote:I'm so envious of you right now. How the hell did you get in?


I scored a 97 on my ASVAB, and a 128 on my DLAB. I had some waivers to fill out, for some speeding tickets and a GED as opposed to high school degree. I also speak conversational Portuguese and Japanese already, but I don't think that was weighed in at all, to be honest.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I attended DLI from 2002-2005. The place is fucking fantastic.


I've heard nothing but great things, it would be nice to talk to someone who's been there that recently though.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I studied Russian, you should let us know what language you're going to be studying once you have been assigned to it.


I hope to get Chinese, Japanese or Korean. Can you talk about what the language assignment process is like?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Which branch of the military are you in?


I'm Navy. Yourself?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:If you score well on the DLAB, you need to be patient while you're drooled over by the guy at MEPS, try to get him not to ship you off that day, and figure out what kind of sizeable bonus you want (in 2002 it was money added to the GI Bill or $15,000. The GI Bill is tax free, so I suggest that.


Yes, they tried to ship me off about four days after my MEPS day, but because I had a GED, I was required to stay three months in the Delayed Entry Program.

I will get a 15K bonus on school completion, but I wasn't given a choice to take the GI Bill... maybe I should ask my recruiter about this.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:EDITED: I'm on percs right now, I'll post back later with some details when I'm sober and not in severe pain.


Please do, and I will check back sooner rather than later.
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:17 pm UTC

I haven't really used this board yet, so I'm not comfortable with the quoting system yet. I'll just try to be contextual with my replies.

First of all, the 97 on the ASVAB is kind of a joke. I doubt very many people here would score less than a 90 unless they were high/sick/tired/apathetic/can't take tests. The ASVAB is designed so that people who barely passed 8th grade can do well. Your DLAB score, on the other hand, is rediculously impressive (assuming it's the same scale mine was on.) To give the some context, the navy requires a 95 on the DLAB to get into the program, where if you scored 100 on the test you are supposed to be mentally equipped to learn well any language taught at the grueling DLI pace.

128 is insane. High DLAB scores are correlated to success at DLI, but the scores do not guarentee that success. Other things are often more important, such as learning style, mental fortitude, verbal memory, and others. On the mental fortitude: they will break your brain.

no, seriously, they will.

first quote attempt:
I hope to get Chinese, Japanese or Korean. Can you talk about what the language assignment process is like?


There are four categories of language taught at DLI (ingeniously numbered 1-4, easiest to hardest). With your scores, you can put your money down on getting a category 4 language, either Araibic, Korean, or Chinese. All three programs were 18 months long. When I left, there were rumors that the people in charge were talking about extending the Korean program due to an abnormally high fail rate.

A few days, maybe a week, after you arrive at the school, the person in charge of assigning students to classes will pull you into a room and ask you what languages you are interested in. Then the person may do their best to get you into one of the languages you like. There is no requirement that they give you a language you want to study, you are there at the pleasure of the Navy, but oftentimes a student will be placed in a language he or she will enjoy. Unfortunately for you enlisted Navy personnel are not allowed to study Japanese.

Yes, they tried to ship me off about four days after my MEPS day, but because I had a GED, I was required to stay three months in the Delayed Entry Program.


I never understood the military's dislike of the GED, given the uselessness of the ASVAB. I homeschooled through the end of high school, and while I intended to get my GED as opposed to having a homeschooling diploma, I ran into the same goofy barrier.

Also, the government is in the process of retooling the GI Bill, so it is possible that they aren't giving that particular type of bonus at the moment. Also, you already signed your contract, you're stuck. neener neener neeeener =)


Now I don't know how old you are, or how much you've traveled, or what your backround is like. All I can say is if you kept some things to yourself during the preliminary security screening at MEPS, don't keep it hidden when they do a more in depth one at DLI. They will find out everything. If my experience was not atypical you will run into people you haven't seen in years, whose names you just did not remember, you come up to you mentioning some agent inquiring about you.

I don't really know what to tell you, but I'd be happy to answer any questions I can. You could PM me, or just reply, it's up to you. If you can tell me a little about yourself (age, informal educational backround, interests, etc.) I can try to tailor my answers to your specific situation.

One thing I can tell you: two of the best things about Moneterey: one particular coffee shop, and the Osio Theaters. The Osio is a little theater which is very close to DLI (even when I was crippled I could walk there), and they play foreign and indie films. They also play old movies on random midnights. (old classics like 400 Blows, The Neverending Story, Monty Python, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, etc.) really, it's a great town, if expensive.

Final note: they will break your brain. The drop out/fail rate at DLI is rediculous. A not low enough percentage of people in every program just...break. And a very high percentage of students just...understand.

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Delass » Mon Mar 16, 2009 6:58 pm UTC

/facepalm. This sounds awesome but my recruiter completely failed to mention it. I had no idea it existed until now. Fortunately I havent signed anything, and have been planning to leave highschool into college, hopefully with a NROTC scholarship. But this is interesting. Is it something that is done right after highschool, or can it be done after NROTC/college?

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:00 am UTC

did you not hear me say that they will break your brain?

=)

It is a rating, a job, something the military trains you to do. In the Navy it is called Cryptographic Technician Interpretive (CTI). You need to ask your recruiter to be sure, as I'm sure there are different rules for officers, but it is a program any enlisted person may enter into if they have the scores.

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Delass » Tue Mar 17, 2009 6:02 am UTC

Your emphasis on that makes it sound like a good thing for me. Iv always wanted to learn another language, probobly arabic or japanese, but my options for learning another language have always kind of sucked (highschool spanish). I just wasnt motivated, for a few reasons. However, the military in my experience is pretty good at motivating people. And being able to dedicate my life to learning it means I dont have to focus on other more important things, and it seems like it would count towards my 8 required years as well.

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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:42 pm UTC

Chad.Boudreau wrote:First of all, the 97 on the ASVAB is kind of a joke. I doubt very many people here would score less than a 90 unless they were high/sick/tired/apathetic/can't take tests. The ASVAB is designed so that people who barely passed 8th grade can do well.


Agreed. I spent about two hours brushing up on basic Algebra and fractions and pretty much aced the math part. The English parts were similarly easy.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:A few days, maybe a week, after you arrive at the school, the person in charge of assigning students to classes will pull you into a room and ask you what languages you are interested in. Then the person may do their best to get you into one of the languages you like. There is no requirement that they give you a language you want to study, you are there at the pleasure of the Navy, but oftentimes a student will be placed in a language he or she will enjoy.


So, if my preferences are narrowed down to Chinese and Korean, what is the likelihood of getting one, and dodging a language like Arabic?

I'd read that in a couple of places that, aside from DLAB scores, it depends on what classes start soon after your arrival.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Unfortunately for you enlisted Navy personnel are not allowed to study Japanese.


Shit, really? Could prior knowledge of the language change anything, or is it set in stone?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I never understood the military's dislike of the GED, given the uselessness of the ASVAB. I homeschooled through the end of high school, and while I intended to get my GED as opposed to having a homeschooling diploma, I ran into the same goofy barrier.


My theory is that a GED shows that someone is either unwilling, or unable to put up with High School crap, and is therefor less likely to put up with military crap.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Also, the government is in the process of retooling the GI Bill, so it is possible that they aren't giving that particular type of bonus at the moment. Also, you already signed your contract, you're stuck. neener neener neeeener =)


Fuckers.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I don't really know what to tell you, but I'd be happy to answer any questions I can. You could PM me, or just reply, it's up to you. If you can tell me a little about yourself (age, informal educational backround, interests, etc.) I can try to tailor my answers to your specific situation.


When I ship in May, I will be 22 years old, I'm from New England. I'm pretty well traveled, although I've never been to Asia, Africa or Australia. I've lived abroad in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for six months learning Portuguese. As far as interests, aside from strange lands and peoples, I like martial arts, cooking, good beer and classical music.

I'm a classical pianist, so most of my free time is spent at the piano practicing. Do you know of any music colleges in Monterey from which I might be able to rent a practice room? Will I even have time to think about extra-curricular stuff like this?

Any good MMA / Jiu-Jitsu schools in Monterey?

How's transportation in Monterey?

What's the housing like?

Aside from being challenging, what are classes like? Do you find yourself happy with the progress you're making in your language? Are they engaging? Do you find yourself having to cram and forget, or is there a real emphasis on learning?

Thanks Chad!

edit:

Regarding advancement and assignments.

Assuming you start the DLI as an E-2, what can you expect to graduate as? How are prospects for advancement afterward as CTI? What kind of assignments are you given - ship, land base, sub, etc..? Have you done any dirsup?
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Wed Mar 18, 2009 4:50 am UTC

Agreed. I spent about two hours brushing up on basic Algebra and fractions and pretty much aced the math part. The English parts were similarly easy.


I know what you mean, I asked if there was going to be any algebra 2 on it, was told yes, so I learned it (cram and forget...you can't learn an entire subject in one weekend, you can only pretend to).

So, if my preferences are narrowed down to Chinese and Korean, what is the likelihood of getting one, and dodging a language like Arabic?

I'd read that in a couple of places that, aside from DLAB scores, it depends on what classes start soon after your arrival.


I would imagine your chances of getting one of those two languages are very high. Given your background as a classical pianist, I'd bet money you'll be thrown into chinese quicker than a political dissident.
bad joke, sorry.
On the other hand, things have been heating up recently on the korean peninsula, so if that doesn't quiet down they might put you there.

When I was getting my class assignment there was actually a 6 month wait before class began. By the time I left DLI they had gotten the logistics down. What I'm about to say is only my personal observation, may not be true now, and may have never been true: the army seemed to throw people into class based primarily on DLAB scores and class availability. Many of the army people I talked to, while generally happy, were disaffected by the process of being assigned. The Marines were always an enigma to me. The Navy mostly seemed to act as if they felt there was a genuine correlation between a persons interests and how well they did in a particular language. So again, given your musical interests, I'd put money on your taking an asian language, the incomprehensible (to me) tonal monstrosity that is mandarin chinese is much more likely for you than arabic.

My theory is that a GED shows that someone is either unwilling, or unable to put up with High School crap, and is therefor less likely to put up with military crap.


They let me walk right in when I told them I sat around on my own for two years studying whatever I was interested in, but wouldn't have let me walk right in with a GED. They took nonconformist Chad with no oversight immediately, but would have made nonconformist Chad with proof of learning wait. WTF?

Your questions about music colleges and MMA schools would best be answered by Google. A couple of my friends did go to a martial arts school, but I don't remember the style, and they only moderately enjoyed the training. The arts center closest to Monterey is Carmel (not hard to get to at all), so your searches should encompass that area too.

Transportation within Monterey is easy. The Osio theater, several good restaurants, a couple nice coffee places, a couple touristy things (including a weekly "Farmers Market"), a beach (water is too cold for swimming), and a couple great bars are within easy walking distance. For things a little farther away the bus system is cheap and on time, and cabs seem at times to reach ubiquity.

Housing is interesting. Unless you are married, or have your own independent source of income, you will be living on base. Those details are fuzzy at this late hour, so I'll try to say more about it next time.

Classes. Classes classes classes...
Let me start by saying that while I graduated with honors, and scored a 3, 2+, 2 on the DLPT (damn hair away from 332 =(...), I have mostly forgotten my language. I developed knee problems early on at DLI, and couldn't get better, so I was sent home after class was finished.
Classes are challenging, they are long, tough, grueling...and more importantly vary by language! People in Persian Farsi never seemed to have to study or do homework, while the people in Arabic didn't seem to do anything for the first 6 months, before they started working hard. The people in Spanish were always running around like chickens. The people who had it the worst were Korean students, followed by a tossup between Chinese and Russian, with Arabic being in 4th.
In reverse order, People in Arabic told me that they spent the first months learning the complicated grammar/word patterning thing of Arabic (all words of MSA are apparently derived in a predictable way from base words, on a 10 step table. I have no idea if it's true, they could have been playing with me.)
People in Chinese were never found without cards to study with. They seemed content, but busy with a steady manageable workload at all times.
Russian is so tough at this school only because it is condensed into 12 months, instead of 18, like the other three. 2-4 hours of homework+2-4 hours of studying every night after classes for the average student. With a DLAB score of 128 you will not be put into this wonderful language. If you are, I will have a heart attack.

Korean...wow. The best way I can describe the Korean students is stressed out. TOTALLY stressed out. Every so often there would be rumors that the school was going to make the korean program longer. I really don't know what to say about the Korean program. I would have close friends who would go in and they'd just...be gone. I'd KNOW they were in the room next to me, but I could never find them.

You asked if it was a cram and forget style, and it is not. There is a lot of cramming, and there is a lot of forgetting, but every one of your teachers knows that they are training you to defend our nation, that it is very possible that your retention of the material could save lives, and if you forget something at a crucial time people could die.
You will learn way more than you forget, despite the cramming often associated with study at DLI, due to the semi-immersive nature of your future studies.

You will be challenged. If you can keep up, you will be happy with the progress you're making in your language. You will be engaged. You will cram. You will forget. You will find a very real emphasis on learning.


Regarding advancement: I believe (though am not totally positive) that you will become an E-3 shortly after getting there, if not before. When you graduate, you will become an E-4, it was a part of the program.

As I mentioned, I got hurt and had to leave the military, so I didn't get to do any of the fun stuff. That said, the assignments you get will be based upon your language and your scores.

Do you want to know about boot camp, or should I let you find out how funny it is on your own?

Hope I've been helpful,

Chad

P.S. I failed spanish in middle school.
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:54 pm UTC

Chad.Boudreau wrote:When I was getting my class assignment there was actually a 6 month wait before class began.


Wait, you were at DLI for six months before your classes started? Or have I misunderstood...?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:(including a weekly "Farmers Market")


Oh... I meant to ask about the food. How is it? Do you have any opportunity to buy your own and prepare it yourself, assuming you're living on base?)

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Housing is interesting. Unless you are married, or have your own independent source of income, you will be living on base. Those details are fuzzy at this late hour, so I'll try to say more about it next time.


I remember hearing about Phases, and I seem to recall hearing that Phase IV people got private rooms in a dorm, or something.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Let me start by saying that while I graduated with honors, and scored a 3, 2+, 2 on the DLPT (damn hair away from 332 =(...), I have mostly forgotten my language. I developed knee problems early on at DLI, and couldn't get better, so I was sent home after class was finished.


Forgot your language already? For shame! Sorry to hear about your knee, that must have been a kick in the teeth to get disqualified after going through all of your training.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:[...]every one of your teachers knows that they are training you to defend our nation, that it is very possible that your retention of the material could save lives, and if you forget something at a crucial time people could die.


Were teachers available outside of class time for extra study, were you pretty much on your own, or did it vary teacher to teacher?

What were class sizes like?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Regarding advancement: I believe (though am not totally positive) that you will become an E-3 shortly after getting there, if not before. When you graduate, you will become an E-4, it was a part of the program.


Are you certain that you are moved to E-4 on graduation? I know I heard somewhere that the top of the class for A schools are bumped to E-4, but it might have been my recruiter talking about another rate.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:[...]assignments you get will be based upon your language and your scores.


Were the higher scores given more choice, or put in 'harder' situations?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Do you want to know about boot camp, or should I let you find out how funny it is on your own?


:) Will they let me bring my laptop, and do you think they'll have WiFi? Also, my name is hard to pronounce correctly, how often should I correct the RDCs - a lot, or just every once in a while?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Hope I've been helpful,


Definitely, I'm going to keep picking your brain until we're sick of each other.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:P.S. I failed spanish in middle school.
[/quote]

I see your middle school Spanish fail and raise you a 9th grade Latin fail.
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Wed Mar 18, 2009 6:29 pm UTC

Wait, you were at DLI for six months before your classes started? Or have I misunderstood...?


You have not misunderstood. I do believe they fixed the logistical problems though. A lot of people signed up for the military after 9/11, and so, to keep class sizes small, they had to hold people for a while.

Oh... I meant to ask about the food. How is it? Do you have any opportunity to buy your own and prepare it yourself, assuming you're living on base?)


Again, things may have changed. While a lot of bases are as they have been since the dawn of time, and will remain unchanging, pumping out people ready to die at a moments notice for their country, linguists are not treated that way. You are going to the place that taught me I was not very smart. The people at DLI are treated very well, and the base is well funded.

While there had been talk of installing a kitchen in the Navy barracks so that people could prepare their own food, by the time I was done it had not materialized.

The food in the mess hall is...ok. Actually, all of the food prepared on base is merely OK. If you want to pay for your food off base, some of it is incredible. To this day, if I am driving across the country, and my GPS tells me there is a Chipotle's within like...a 50 mile radius, I'm going. Jack in the Box (fast food) is 10 times better than what we have here in the NE. There are restaurants which are very good close to the base. There is one, far away, which is absolutely fantastic (the best place I've ever seen where I could wear a hoodie inside.
I remember hearing about Phases, and I seem to recall hearing that Phase IV people got private rooms in a dorm, or something.


Phases exist for everybody who is not a marine, but they vary by service. The Army and Flyboys had 4 phases, while the Navy had 3. In the first phase, you can't go out unless you are in uniform. Also, you have to share a room on the first floor of the main building with 2 other people. That phase doesn't last long. In the second phase you can go out in your civilian clothes, but you have a curfew. Also, in the second phase you can be moved to the second floor and have only one roommate.

In the third phase, you have no curfew, and you can be put on a list to move to one of two buildings down the road, where you will still have a roommate, but you will also have a private bathroom.

Forgot your language already? For shame! Sorry to hear about your knee, that must have been a kick in the teeth to get disqualified after going through all of your training.

Yeah, thanks... I got hurt pretty early in my DLI career, and was very fortunate that they let me stay on as long as they did. Still, I was seriously, seriously depressed about being a cripple. I was OK with dying when I went into the service, but I was not OK about being crippled. Problems arose. Still, I'd love to go back and see how well I can do in class NOT being depressed. B's are good, I wonder if, not being depressed, I could get the A's and 3-3-2+ I always wanted.

Were teachers available outside of class time for extra study, were you pretty much on your own, or did it vary teacher to teacher?

What were class sizes like?


In the Russian program, for the first couple of months, half of your lunch break was taken up by extra study time with the teachers. After that probationary period ended, you had to go to the extra study time only if your grades fell below a certain point. Further, some teachers were available for extra study time on an individual basis if students asked. I never did, so I'm not certain how that worked, and that I didn't meant my friends refused to talk to me about that experience in their languages.

Class sizes are small, and get smaller as time goes on. People fail, get rolled back, just go insane and quit (serious)...At the start your classes should be no larger than 12 people. The whole group may collectively be 40 people, but that number will be split into smaller sections more conducive to your studies.

You are talking about a place filled with intelligent people, stuffed with good teachers, and brimming with smart servicepeople. Many, if not most, of the decisions made about classes, programs, and whatnot are based on science. They have a lot of data, and they use it constructively. If something isn't working, or is hindering the ability of many students to learn, it tends to change.

Are you certain that you are moved to E-4 on graduation? I know I heard somewhere that the top of the class for A schools are bumped to E-4, but it might have been my recruiter talking about another rate.


I am certain that every navy person who graduated with qualifying DLPT scores was moved to E-4 upon graduation. I am less certain that every navy person was elevated to E-3 upon arrival, but I think that's what happened.

Just before I went home, I had enough time in rank to take the test to become an E-5. Unfortunately, nobody was told that I had my security clearance until the day before the test, and *I* was not told until that morning. Consequently I could not study for <1/2 of the test. Somehow, I managed to pass, but not be accepted, into E-5. Good for college credits though.

Were the higher scores given more choice, or put in 'harder' situations?


I do not know. At the time of graduation, the Russian program was being reduced, so every single one of us were slated to go work at the NSA.

Will they let me bring my laptop, and do you think they'll have WiFi? Also, my name is hard to pronounce correctly, how often should I correct the RDCs - a lot, or just every once in a while?

ROFL!
I had an open wound inside my mouth by the end of boot camp due to my efforts to not laugh.
There was one other CTI in my group. We designed a makeshift chess board. We had fun. No one else seemed to.
I see that you are into martial arts. Before I went into the service I was into martial arts too, and I've got to give you this friendly warning: for all their talk about making people more fit, they don't mean you. I lost muscle mass during boot camp =(

That's particularly impressive as I've always been really scrawny, even then.

I see your middle school Spanish fail and raise you a 9th grade Latin fail.


Latin already failed as a language, it doesn't need your help now! :lol:

Edit: should I change my siggy? It was supposed to be goofy in its meaninglessness (see "yay?"), but it may be a bit pretentious, I dunno.
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yay?

0range
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Thu Mar 19, 2009 6:29 am UTC

Chad.Boudreau wrote:You have not misunderstood. I do believe they fixed the logistical problems though. A lot of people signed up for the military after 9/11, and so, to keep class sizes small, they had to hold people for a while.


Damn.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:In the third phase, you have no curfew, and you can be put on a list to move to one of two buildings down the road, where you will still have a roommate, but you will also have a private bathroom.


Was there any effort to group students by language, or was it random?

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I am certain that every navy person who graduated with qualifying DLPT scores was moved to E-4 upon graduation. I am less certain that every navy person was elevated to E-3 upon arrival, but I think that's what happened.

Just before I went home, I had enough time in rank to take the test to become an E-5. Unfortunately, nobody was told that I had my security clearance until the day before the test, and *I* was not told until that morning. Consequently I could not study for <1/2 of the test. Somehow, I managed to pass, but not be accepted, into E-5. Good for college credits though.


Cool. So eventually they tell you that you've passed your clearance? I'm not really sweating it, I don't have anything disqualifying, as far as I know, but all the same, it will be a relief to know certainly.

Chad.Boudreau wrote:I had an open wound inside my mouth by the end of boot camp due to my efforts to not laugh.
There was one other CTI in my group. We designed a makeshift chess board. We had fun. No one else seemed to.
I see that you are into martial arts. Before I went into the service I was into martial arts too, and I've got to give you this friendly warning: for all their talk about making people more fit, they don't mean you. I lost muscle mass during boot camp =(


Yeah, I'm under no illusions as to the purpose and practice of bootcamp. The only part I'm worried about is learning how to fold clothes and make my bed (it would be generous eeto say that I've ever done either of these).

Chad.Boudreau wrote:Edit: should I change my siggy? It was supposed to be goofy in its meaninglessness (see "yay?"), but it may be a bit pretentious, I dunno.


Yes, I would photoshop it to show all 100's. Then everyone is certain to know how much superior you are. :mrgreen:
"A person who persists in believing what is not true or disbelieving what is true can waste a lifetime of effort on something that is without hope of success."

E. Jayne

Chad.Boudreau
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby Chad.Boudreau » Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:55 pm UTC

I don't believe there was any effort to group people by language. The army does, but I don't know that it improves their performance at all.

When you get you'll have special requirements to fill, so yes, they will tell you. It took so long for me to get my clearance because I honestly could not remember the answers to their questions.

"Tell us how to contact x number of people who know you"
"um...I can't remember any names. There's person 2, they live in ___ area. If you go right at intersection just before the northwestern edge of the park, going north, then visit the 4th house on the left, they can tell you their name."
I don't think they liked that much.

In boot camp, they will instruct you on the EXACT method of folding your clothes, and making your bed. They don't say "fold your T-shirt", they say "Take your T-shirt, lay it on the ground facing away from you, tag this way. no THIS way. ... you take this edge and place it one inch below that edge. ... Ok, now you have a properly folded shirt. Let's move on."

You will have exact directions to follow. It's easy, and easily forgotten once you leave.
Yes, I would photoshop it to show all 100's. Then everyone is certain to know how much superior you are.


Blah.

The funniest part of boot camp is watching people cry for odd reasons.

The scariest part of boot camp is talking to somebody who is going to be responsible for serious firepower and having them tell you they had to take the ASVAB SIX TIMES BEFORE THEY PASSED.

I'm not exaggerating. I think I am going to go lay down now in abject horror.
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0range
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Re: Anyone attend the DLI at Monterey, CA?

Postby 0range » Fri Mar 20, 2009 2:52 am UTC

Chad.Boudreau wrote:The funniest part of boot camp is watching people cry for odd reasons.


Okay, watching people cry is pretty funny. Maybe I'll have a harder time keeping quiet than I thought...

Chad.Boudreau wrote:The scariest part of boot camp is talking to somebody who is going to be responsible for serious firepower and having them tell you they had to take the ASVAB SIX TIMES BEFORE THEY PASSED.


I think it's pretty depressing that such a person exists at all... it makes me look at a few incidents that sparked me to make an effort not to be a dumbass and wonder what it would've been like a little different..
"A person who persists in believing what is not true or disbelieving what is true can waste a lifetime of effort on something that is without hope of success."

E. Jayne


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