What do other countries teach about The united states?

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Hoerne
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What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Hoerne » Sat Jun 13, 2009 2:26 am UTC

As the title says I am interested in what other country's school systems teach you about The U.S., Specifically the American Revolution in places like Great Britain and Canada.

I was thinking about how most people only get one view of the situation and I wanted to know what other country's peoples see from their perspective; so If you are not from America please tell me what you know about us.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Synergy » Sat Jun 13, 2009 3:16 am UTC

the question isn't always what other countries teach about us, but what we teach other countries about our selves. I knew a Japanese student in Germany. She had the option to study in the Uk or the US for her year abroad. She chose the UK because her American English teach portrayed America as a terrible, violent place.

as for your question about American history in other countries, I'm sure that America's history warrants at least half a chapter in most foreign text books. I'm also sure it is horribly simplified.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Kizyr » Sat Jun 13, 2009 3:36 am UTC

To add onto this... what do Canadian schools generally teach about the War of 1812? KF
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Vieto
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Vieto » Sat Jun 13, 2009 3:52 am UTC

Well, I know mostly what happened, from both perspectives (I took American history), but to sum things up on what Canadians think of 1812:

America thinks Canada wants to be free of 'oppressing' British. America = wrong.

Brock + Tecumseh take over Detroit
Americans take over + Burn York/Toronto
Laura Secord
We burn down white house
We burn down New Orleans
Canada beats USA
Borders returned to normal.

namely, its the one time in history where America was defeated by Canada :D

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby poxic » Sat Jun 13, 2009 4:01 am UTC

I don't know what Cdn schools teach about it, since I was out of the country during my junior and senior high school years. (We mostly learned about ancient Western cultures during my elementary school years. Greece, Rome, Mesopotamia, that sort of thing. I don't know if that has changed.)

Popular culture holds that the Canadians won, since we managed to get far enough to torch the White House. (Somewhat-common trivia question up here: why is the White House white? Because it was painted that colour after we set fire to it during the War of 1812.)

Technically, it was the British who fought the war, with the help of aboriginal people. Canada as an entity didn't exist until 1867. I think there have been acknowledgments that the British were better off for engaging the aboriginal people, many of whom were angry at the Americans for the way they were treated in American territory at the time. (Yes, aboriginal treatment in Canada also sucks hard. I don't know enough about history to say whether this was different a couple of centuries ago.)

As far as general perceptions go, Americans seem to be sometimes highly regarded, sometimes despised in Canadian culture. When you live in a country that is basically dependent on trade with another, and that other has ten times the population and many times the world power, it's inevitable that you'll feel like the poorer cousin, one who looks for every possible little way in which you're superior to the hulking beast that lives next door. It's probably not much different than Austria feels toward Germany, or Scotland to England, or New Zealand to Australia, and I can only feel empathy for all of the former (and current) satellites of Russia. National identity is hard when you resent the country that tells you who you are.

On the other hand, it's kind of nice to be part of a country that has very few illusions about itself. Patriotism is almost seen as a disease, something to be cured by paying attention to reality. Yes, we like living here, and no, most of us would not choose to move to the US, or elsewhere. It's a nice place to be, and we like it this way. Growing too big for our britches would be the worst thing that could happen to this country. I sincerely hope that those politicians who love the US model will fail to implement it here. I prefer quiet anonymity, on the world stage, to noisy agitation. It gets us in less trouble, overall.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Sethric » Sat Jun 13, 2009 9:53 am UTC

Vieto wrote:Well, I know mostly what happened, from both perspectives (I took American history), but to sum things up on what Canadians think of 1812:
[snip]


Wow.

I think that is the best word that describes this. One of the primary causes was British impeding French/U.S. trade. Also, the U.S. believed that the British were arming Native Americans in an attempt to halt U.S. expansion westward. There were some who thought that Canada would "throw off the yoke", but it wasn't the driving motivation for declaration.

When was New Orleans burned? The Battle of New Orleans, which was technically fought after the Treaty of Ghent was a large victory for the U.S. (and subsequently had a huge effect on politics, since Jackson became a hero and eventually president). The burning of Washington was irrelevant, as it was largely abandoned - since it was considered to be strategically unimportant and hard to defend against a superior British navy. The Americans felt Baltimore was the important city, and the Battle of Baltimore attests to that fact. The war largely fell into a stalemate. There were victories on both sides, but neither side held a strategic advantage at the end. The end results probably would have been much different if the War of 1812 hadn't been a part of the much larger Napoleonic Wars that embroiled Europe, distracting a majority of British troops and funds.

I'm not surprised. I know our government lies to us.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby LaserGuy » Sat Jun 13, 2009 4:06 pm UTC

Hoerne wrote:As the title says I am interested in what other country's school systems teach you about The U.S., Specifically the American Revolution in places like Great Britain and Canada.

I was thinking about how most people only get one view of the situation and I wanted to know what other country's peoples see from their perspective; so If you are not from America please tell me what you know about us.


In the Canadian high school I went to, the American Revolution was covered in a day.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Vieto » Sat Jun 13, 2009 4:35 pm UTC

Sethric wrote:
Vieto wrote:Well, I know mostly what happened, from both perspectives (I took American history), but to sum things up on what Canadians think of 1812:
[snip]


Wow.

I think that is the best word that describes this. One of the primary causes was British impeding French/U.S. trade. Also, the U.S. believed that the British were arming Native Americans in an attempt to halt U.S. expansion westward. There were some who thought that Canada would "throw off the yoke", but it wasn't the driving motivation for declaration.

When was New Orleans burned? The Battle of New Orleans, which was technically fought after the Treaty of Ghent was a large victory for the U.S. (and subsequently had a huge effect on politics, since Jackson became a hero and eventually president). The burning of Washington was irrelevant, as it was largely abandoned - since it was considered to be strategically unimportant and hard to defend against a superior British navy. The Americans felt Baltimore was the important city, and the Battle of Baltimore attests to that fact. The war largely fell into a stalemate. There were victories on both sides, but neither side held a strategic advantage at the end. The end results probably would have been much different if the War of 1812 hadn't been a part of the much larger Napoleonic Wars that embroiled Europe, distracting a majority of British troops and funds.

I'm not surprised. I know our government lies to us.


I was just summing up the important details + Canadianizing them (see: Poxic's post). I know most of the information above, in addition to the warhawks, the treaty agreeing to demilitarizing the great lakes, the Distraction of the Napoleonic wars, etc.

and yes, we do know it was technically a draw. C'mon, we aren't ignorant. :D

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Hurduser » Sat Jun 13, 2009 6:48 pm UTC

My English teacher was rather anti-American. So what we learned about the USA were various things:
* quite a lot about Wisconsin because some of the textbook texts were there.
* they are horrible people because they have capital punishment (it was an issue which was very important for that teacher)
* seemingly everything about the vote counting problems in Florida leading to the election of GWB
* that many strange people live there, this teacher loved to go on tangents about his experiences.
* about the nonexistance of public transport and the existance of private bus companies

I don't even remember what we learned about the country in other subjects... though I remember that it was a topic in geography...
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Jackster » Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:07 pm UTC

I live in Scotland and in History we only did Scottish history for the two years I took the subject - nothing on the US. In Modern Studies, though, we do a bit on the USA. The two main areas we do are the political system, so things like the constitution, the executive, legislature and judiciary, checks and balances, electoral college etc.; and social issues, mostly on ethnic minorities in the US. In the final exam for Modern Studies this year one of the questions was something like "To what extent have ethnic minorities achieved the American Dream?" - I thought it was quite a good question, easy to talk about a lot of things.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby smadge » Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:30 am UTC

There's a book on the subject, I don't personally know if its any good or not, but it looks interesting. Its called "History Lessons: How Textbooks from Around the World Portray U.S. History." You can find it on Amazon.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Threb » Sun Jun 14, 2009 3:25 am UTC

Kizyr wrote:To add onto this... what do Canadian schools generally teach about the War of 1812? KF


This is related: http://harkavagrant.com/index.php?id=166

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby faye159 » Sun Jun 14, 2009 5:02 am UTC

unless you take a major that's related to american history ...... not much.....


The Americans only come up when they're involved with my country.

As I live in the Philippines, what they taught us was when the US bought my country from Spain (at least that's what i remember... or maybe it was the Spanish-American War). And all that World War stuff...

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Rakysh » Sun Jun 14, 2009 5:58 am UTC

We've never done the US revolution. Ever. That doesn't bother me in the slightest.

Our history is mostly focused on the two world wars, their causes, and the USA's rise to power. Over here, the attitude to the US is mostly that we're pissed at you for dragging us into Iraq. This does come across in many of my more political teachers lessons.

Poxic- I think you're right about Scotland, and I know nothing about Austria, but from my experience Kiwi's are unbothered about Australia- they're regarded as a brasher, slightly immature country but not as innately superior.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby sje46 » Sun Jun 14, 2009 6:14 am UTC

We've never done the US revolution. Ever. That doesn't bother me in the slightest.
Why? That's your country's history too.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Rakysh » Sun Jun 14, 2009 7:48 am UTC

So are a great many things; I guess I just think there are more important things to be learning about in history.

It might be my history, but

i) it's a period of history about which we're really not sure how to feel about (Yeah, we ruled a large portion of the globe, and had the biggest empire ever, but we were pretty crap at it.) and

ii) It just seems a little irrelevant to me. Not that I am saying it is wholly irrelevant, or irrelevant to you, but I think it is important to Americans as it is a defining moment in your history; it is where your country properly became a country. It just has very little to do with me, sitting here in the UK right now.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby sje46 » Sun Jun 14, 2009 8:10 am UTC

Your feelings toward it shouldn't matter at all. Americans don't know how to feel about Hiroshima and Nagasaki still, or the Spanish American war, but we still learn about them.
And yeah, I'm not saying that our revolution should get the same amount of attention as we get. England has a lot of history too, compared to the US. You were the largest superpower in the world, and you should know how you treated your colonies. All about the US, about India, Australia, etc. America learns about their few colonies.
I didn't learn to much about British history, except for my lit class. For my high schools social studies electives I tended to take sociology, geography, etc, and I had to take US history. In college, for my history elective, I took US history again, since the Civil War, because I just find it interesting.
We all had to take Brit Lit, however. American Lit and then Brit Lit. I learned a good deal about British history in that class (not that I still remember most of it) about politics and monarchs and lines and revolutions and stuff. And all of these are quite irrelevant to my life, but my school felt it necessary to make sure we knew this stuff.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Mmmm, Pi » Sun Jun 14, 2009 8:14 am UTC

Yeah, about the only time you'll do the history of America as a subject is if you choose to, or your teacher feels like doing something a bit unusal. I happened learn about the JFK assassination and the American West in secondary school here, but I'm very much in the minority. Most people don't do any American history at all.

The American revolution really isn't a big deal when you think about all the other bits of history that you could be learning about in Britain. Quite simply, we have a hell of a lot more history to learn, so you have to pick bits out and that isn't considered important in any way for a British person to know about in detail.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Beacons! » Sun Jun 14, 2009 5:12 pm UTC

It's just that we've got far more history than the USA available for us to learn. The Romans, Vikings, Normans, WWI, the League of Nations, WWII, all these things come as a priority in the school system over the American Revolution, especially since many things like it occured all across the empire. That is why we never learnt about it.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Durin » Sun Jun 14, 2009 5:22 pm UTC

I don't think we focus enough on World History in the US, to be honest. So, it makes sense that non-US schools don't focus on the US much.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Rakysh » Sun Jun 14, 2009 7:27 pm UTC

Mmmm, Pi wrote:Yeah, about the only time you'll do the history of America as a subject is if you choose to, or your teacher feels like doing something a bit unusal. I happened learn about the JFK assassination and the American West in secondary school here, but I'm very much in the minority. Most people don't do any American history at all.

The American revolution really isn't a big deal when you think about all the other bits of history that you could be learning about in Britain. Quite simply, we have a hell of a lot more history to learn, so you have to pick bits out and that isn't considered important in any way for a British person to know about in detail.


This, really. We have history dating back to the bronze age, and while the USA does too, you prefer to focus on the bit which you know about; the last four or so centuries.

I think I was wrong before; having thought about it, the reason we don't focus on the British Empire is that we're ashamed. Having pride in what is inarguably a great achievement yet what also so obviously a crime of exploitation, racism and arrogance is something we can't do, but something we're worried we might do eventually.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby achan1058 » Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:04 am UTC

Vieto wrote:namely, its the one time in history where America was defeated by Canada :D
Yes, and this is about the only thing I remembered of Canadian history. I recalled doing something with the American civil war a little bit, and WWI/WWII (and US involvement), as well as mocking a certain missing link of evolution.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Gojoe » Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:18 am UTC

History in high school NZ covered the US like 3 times tops. We did a thing about womens rights (I think we were the first country to let women vote), and we did a bit on you guys for that. Also when we covered the two world wars, america was obviously a cameo in that.

And that is about it. Why would we care about you guys?

(I was born in the US, and went know A LOT more about US history than like any of my friends here)
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Quenouille » Mon Jun 15, 2009 3:29 am UTC

I'm from Québec, and I had a North American History class at some point. Most of what I recall about the American Revolution campaign was that the British dominated the naval war, and won 16 out of the 20 (or so) major ground battles. Washington led two american victories on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve while the other camps were celebrating. One battle was won because british reinforcement had gotten lost somewhere in the Appalaches (I think). Also something about americans successfully using ambush tactics. The british merchant class finally convinced their politicians that Britain would be better off making peace and returning to trade seeing as the colony would be too unruly otherwise, so the whole ''crushing the revolution'' idea was abandonned, and free-trade treatises were signed closely following the independance.

I don't know how much of it is true or half-true, and what other side of the medal I'm missing. Obviously I should just watch Mel Gibson's Patriot again and compare.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Vieto » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:50 am UTC

Quenouille wrote:I don't know how much of it is true or half-true, and what other side of the medal I'm missing. Obviously I should just watch Mel Gibson's Patriot again and compare.


Well, besides the fact that you can't snipe with musket balls... no wait, most of that movie appeared to be inaccurate, nvm.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby bearchild » Mon Jun 15, 2009 12:53 pm UTC

I was taught about the "Roaring Twenties", the Wall Street Crash and the Depression. Jolly stuff :)
The main reason we didn't cover anything earlier was because I was taking a History - Modern World GCSE. On a semi-related note, most of the things we were taught were about Germany. I'm British. Hm.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Adacore » Mon Jun 15, 2009 3:19 pm UTC

The two periods of history I remember being taught where the US entered the picture at all were black rights (actually that was more in English Literature classes) and the World Wars. Even there, the US involvement in the European theatre of the World Wars wasn't really covered in any depth, and we didn't focus on the pacific theatre. Here's a summary of history as I covered it in school (in the UK):

- Tudor Period in general, the English Reformation, the various conflicts between the Catholics and Protestants &c., moving through to the Elizabethan era.
- The Jacobean period, the Gunpowder Plot and then with particular reference to the causes of the Civil War; the Cromwellian period, then moving on into the arrival of William of Orange and the Glorious Revolution.
- The Industrial Revolution, with more of a focus on the technological and social implications than the grand politics.
- The French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, Napoleon's conquest of Europe and eventual defeat by Wellington, Nelson, et al.
- Both world wars, obviously.

I had very little by way of world history, as you can probably tell. I think I would've had more if I hadn't dropped history as soon as I was allowed to. I never enjoyed writing essays. I'm fairly certain modern history (cold war stuff, vietnam, &c., with far more state-side focus) would've been covered if I'd stayed on with the history.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Grop » Mon Jun 15, 2009 3:53 pm UTC

When I was in high school (in the 90's) the US came up quite often: WW1&2 and the cold war, but also in classes that were related to progress, such as the industrial revolutions.

US Independance mostly came up as a premise to the French revolution. I don't think I heard of the 1812 war at school.

Also, in geography class we were taught a few things about the (90's) present, mostly about demographics and industry.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby The Binkster » Mon Jun 15, 2009 4:13 pm UTC

Usually very little, because compared to us Europeans you have very little :P (Jokes!)

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Naurgul » Mon Jun 15, 2009 4:41 pm UTC

Wait, do history courses in USA start with the colonization of the Americas? Wouldn't they start way before that? I mean, there were people living there before, weren't they? Otherwise, that would be a really short history. I'm saying this because here history lesson go like this: 3 courses in primary school, 3 courses in junior highschool and 3 courses in highschool. The first always has to do with prehistory and ancient times up until the Romans conquered Greece, the second always has to do with Byzantine times until the Ottoman empire conquered Constantinople and the third always has to do with the Greek revolution (19th century). Only in highschool are matters of more recent history touched a little. The question is: What would you fill all those history courses with if you start in 16th century the earliest? :shock:

Anyway, here the United States are only mentioned in passing in contemporary history, perhaps there's also some mention of their revolution too? Since in highschool there's a more detailed history course I didn't take, maybe more things are taught there.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby sje46 » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:03 pm UTC

Naurgul wrote:Wait, do history courses in USA start with the colonization of the Americas? Wouldn't they start way before that? I mean, there were people living there before, weren't they? Otherwise, that would be a really short history. I'm saying this because here history lesson go like this: 3 courses in primary school, 3 courses in junior highschool and 3 courses in highschool. The first always has to do with prehistory and ancient times up until the Romans conquered Greece, the second always has to do with Byzantine times until the Ottoman empire conquered Constantinople and the third always has to do with the Greek revolution (19th century). Only in highschool are matters of more recent history touched a little. The question is: What would you fill all those history courses with if you start in 16th century the earliest? :shock:

My history class started withy "the dawn of time"; we watched the beginning of 2001: A Space Odyssey (a fun way to start off a year) and I think we very quickly covered cavemen and such. But yeah, of course we covered the Native Americans! And I do believe we covered the pre-Columbus colonists, like the Vikings and the possibility of other people . . .I can't remember who, but I think the Japanese, Chinse, AFricans, and certain Europeans are thought to have discovered America before Columbus, but it is also quite possible that this is a false memory and that I learned that from my mother's book Lies My Teacher Told Me, which I get the feeling that my teacher might have read too.
But to be honest, there is not that much pre-columbian material to cover.

EDIT-Unlike Ancient Greece, there aren't very many (or any?) written documents about pre-Columbian America.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Shivari » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:08 pm UTC

Naurgul wrote:Wait, do history courses in USA start with the colonization of the Americas? Wouldn't they start way before that? I mean, there were people living there before, weren't they? Otherwise, that would be a really short history. I'm saying this because here history lesson go like this: 3 courses in primary school, 3 courses in junior highschool and 3 courses in highschool. The first always has to do with prehistory and ancient times up until the Romans conquered Greece, the second always has to do with Byzantine times until the Ottoman empire conquered Constantinople and the third always has to do with the Greek revolution (19th century). Only in highschool are matters of more recent history touched a little. The question is: What would you fill all those history courses with if you start in 16th century the earliest? :shock:


We learn about all of the stuff you mentioned in grade school, usually. It's not like we just skip everything before colonization, I really didn't get a course that was totally centered around the Americas until 8th grade, everything before that was mostly world history of before the Americas were discovered (we still learned some bits of American history during those grades, but it wasn't the focus). But yeah, it's not like we're like "No history is worth learning but American History!", I learned quite a bit about history around the world.

And yeah, I learned quite a bit about Native Americans pre-colonization in 6th grade, and it was touched upon in 8th grade and then AP US History for maybe a chapter, but we learn more about everything that happened after colonization when it comes to the US, probably because there isn't a huge amount of history about those times (I'm sure there's more once you get to college, but we just kinda cover the different tribes and such in grade school).

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Naurgul » Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:58 pm UTC

Thanks for satisfying my curiosity, sje46, Shivari. :)
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Yakk » Mon Jun 15, 2009 9:10 pm UTC

I'm not sure how much of this was from school, but...

Some mention was made of the abortive attempts to engage Canada in the Rebellion.
The United Empire Loyalists, and how they provided a significant boon to the economy of Canada (UEL's where the people who fled the rebellion, and where given homesteads in Canada.)
The building of various forts and fort-cities to defend Canada against American invasion (Halifax, Kingston, etc).
The building of the Rideau Canal system to provide a supply link from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes that would be harder to cut than the St. Lawrence seaway.
America joining in WWI and WWII as Johnny-come-lately's. Some on the impact of that on the war(s).
The War of 1812. The taking of fort Detroit(?) by the massively outnumbered British and Indian forces. The burning of the White House. The Quebec troops who marched into the USA, fortified, waited, waited, and where told the war was over. The fight at New Orleans (which occurred after the peace, but before messages got there) and how it would be ... interesting ... if the British where occupying the headwaters of the Mississippi after the armstice. The burning of York (Toronto).
Fenian raids over in the Maritimes, and their contribution to international tension.
The Westward expansion of Canada, driven by the fear that America would annex the land. Maps with disputed territory (esp. around BC).
The longest undefended boarder.
American invention of the doctrine of "hot pursuit" when chasing a Canadian booze smuggler over their territorial boundary.
Canadian involvement in liquor smuggling into the prohibition era USA, which is the foundation of more than a few breweries in Canada.
Canadian involvement in NORAD and NATO and the northern missile warning shield.
US involvement in the cancellation of Canada's Avro Arrow project.
The American Korean War involvement with Canada.
Canada sitting out of Vietnam, and the accepting of dissenters as political refugees. As secondary impact, the Vietnamese boat people.
Impact of American immigration to Canada's western expansion.
Some talk about Native Americans fleeing to Canada from American persecution.
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby bigglesworth » Mon Jun 15, 2009 9:37 pm UTC

I only learnt about the revolution as background to the French Revolution, which was a very different creature.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Shpow » Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:48 am UTC

Besides the odd one-off mentions or jokes, America featured little to none in my education. The only thing they had here was NATO stationed for a while and Marshall Aid after WWII. Other than that, nothing. A little bit glad about that to be perfectly honest.
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Chuff » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:09 am UTC

I'm an American who has lived in Canada most of his life, and a lot of how Canadians seem to define themselves is how they compare to Americans. I really like Canada, and I really wish you guys would realize that you're an awesome place in your own right and you don't have to prove yourselves against the US. In pretty much everything, you win proportionally, anyways. Be happy!

On the topic of the War of 1812, I was basically taught it as The War of American Aggression. Our teachers basically said that the US wanted to take over Canada, but Laura Secord single-handedly defeated the entire American Army and burned down the White House. She tricked the stupid Americans into giving her information, clapped her hands to make a cow appear, and walked in her bare feet across the countryside through the woods, using the cow as an excuse, and brought the news to the government.

Rakysh wrote:We've never done the US revolution. Ever. That doesn't bother me in the slightest.

Our history is mostly focused on the two world wars, their causes, and the USA's rise to power. Over here, the attitude to the US is mostly that we're pissed at you for dragging us into Iraq. This does come across in many of my more political teachers lessons.

Poxic- I think you're right about Scotland, and I know nothing about Austria, but from my experience Kiwi's are unbothered about Australia- they're regarded as a brasher, slightly immature country but not as innately superior.

You do realize Canada isn't in Iraq, right?
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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Yakk » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:35 am UTC

Chuff wrote:
Rakysh wrote:We've never done the US revolution. Ever. That doesn't bother me in the slightest.

Our history is mostly focused on the two world wars, their causes, and the USA's rise to power. Over here, the attitude to the US is mostly that we're pissed at you for dragging us into Iraq. This does come across in many of my more political teachers lessons.

Poxic- I think you're right about Scotland, and I know nothing about Austria, but from my experience Kiwi's are unbothered about Australia- they're regarded as a brasher, slightly immature country but not as innately superior.

You do realize Canada isn't in Iraq, right?

First, you do realize:
Rakysh
Location: UK

right? :)

Second, while Canada "isn't in Iraq", Canadians (and members of the Canadian Armed Forces) are in Iraq. You'd be surprise how intertwined the Canadian and US armed forces get.
One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision - BR

Last edited by JHVH on Fri Oct 23, 4004 BCE 6:17 pm, edited 6 times in total.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby acb » Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:36 am UTC

I went to school in England, and dropped history when I was 14. Honestly, I do not remember doing anything about American history at all. We did Britain 1066-First World War, and in primary school stuff like "The Egyptians", "The Victorians" etc. If I had done GCSE I would have done a few months on The American West.

I would have liked to have done more 20th century history/politics as I feel that is more relevant to people nowadays. Then the US would have come up a lot more, as well as the rest of the world. Anything I know about politics and recent(ish) history I picked up myself. I think it is important that kids get a more global view of history and politics as we become a much more globalised society, but I suspect education will lag behind a bit.

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Re: What do other countries teach about The united states?

Postby Adacore » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:53 pm UTC

Pretty similar to me there, acb - and I believe the modern history and politics side of it is covered in considerably more depth after 14 - there's certainly some of it in GCSE stuff, and I think it's the most common major focus of A-level history. My sister did a distance learning A-level in history and deliberately found a course that focussed on the Tudor period - she complained when she was looking that most of them were modern history, which she wasn't interested in.

I'm curious about the inversion of this question - what do people in the United States learn about European history? I'd ask about Asian and African history as well, but I know so little of that I'd be unable to judge whether you actually did anything interesting or not :?


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