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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Impulse97 » Sun May 24, 2009 2:46 am UTC

(1)Flight of the Intruder By Stephen Coonts Also, his (2)Fourtunes of War is good.

(1) The book is the first in a long 7-9 (i lost count) book series following fearless Jake Grafton through his naval carrer from a carrier in Vietnam to his being the haed of the ***. dont want to spoil it. lol. Hint: it's an american organization that sprouted from the OSS in ww2.

(2) A single book that follows a fictional war between Japan and Russia and a top sectet group of american fighter piolets at the helm of F-22 Raptors.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby monkandmovies13 » Sun May 24, 2009 8:01 pm UTC

The Three Inch Golden Lotus, by Feng Jicai. It's about a Chinese woman with bound feet and how it affects her marriage, status, and perception of a changing China. It's actually very funny and captivating, and the sense of humor is unlike any I've really ever experienced.

And my favorite book is The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. Even as someone who tends not to like wartime books, movies, etc, this book had such a lasting effect on me. A really wonderful piece of writing.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby MHD » Fri May 29, 2009 10:03 pm UTC

The Culture series by Iain M. Banks:

In chronological order:
Cosider Phlebas '87
The Player of Games '88 *
Use of Weapons '90 *
Excession '96 *
Inversions '98
Look to Windward '00
Matter '08

* marks the one i have read

The Culture is a highly developed space traveling, well, culture, wich may or may not have developed from humans. It is one of the best and most inspiring utopian soscieties I have ever encountered.
Most of the stories center around citicens of the culture traveling to other, less developed soscieties or vice versa.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Mr.RobLikesBrunch » Sun May 31, 2009 2:49 pm UTC

monkandmovies13 wrote:The Three Inch Golden Lotus, by Feng Jicai. It's about a Chinese woman with bound feet and how it affects her marriage, status, and perception of a changing China. It's actually very funny and captivating, and the sense of humor is unlike any I've really ever experienced.

And my favorite book is The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. Even as someone who tends not to like wartime books, movies, etc, this book had such a lasting effect on me. A really wonderful piece of writing.


I get to read that for AP Lit this summer :D
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Snowflake » Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:26 pm UTC

Wild Nights by David Deida, for everyone who is into spirituality. Theme: pushing the boundaries of spirituality through boundless love.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby kapojinha » Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:47 am UTC

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak - it's about a little girl during WWII told from the point of view of the Grim Reaper.

Did anyone recommend War and Peace yet? That book is a nightmare to get through! There's over 500 characters! I can hardly keep track of all of them.. nonetheless, it's still a pretty good book.

Les Miserables - a good book to read if you like reading and have a lot of free time on your hands.

Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham [sp?] is also pretty good.

The Book of Lost Things is one of my favourites - the only book of John Connolly's that I really like.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby kapojinha » Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:54 am UTC

Destructonaught wrote:Sabriel by Garth Nix is a good one. Magic, zombies, and a compelling story. What's not to like?


The first book was good, but then the second and third books of the series focused on an entirely new character. I didn't like that. Getting to know a character.. and then having to get to know another one while the original character's still stuck in your mind, and then sticking with the new character for two whole books, and only getting to hear about the original character occasionally? That annoyed me. xD
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby teamcorndog » Tue Jun 09, 2009 1:47 pm UTC

I recommend 'Sharp Teeth' by Toby Barlow. It's about lycanthropes -- people who can turn into huge killer dogs at will. It's set in L.A. and written in verse. I never thought a book about werewolves could be so moving and beautiful. Of course, there's also quite a bit of gore...
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Ampaire » Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:25 am UTC

For those who have seen Blade Runner, but haven't read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, I heartily recommend the novel. It's more different from the movie than I was lead to believe, enough so that it's well worth a read even to those who have seen the movie, as well as tho who haven't.

Another, longer novel which I love and all internet dwellers should read, is of course, Cryptonomicon. A hefty undertaking, to say the least, but it's well worth the time it takes to read it. A warning for those who may buy the meatspace version of the novel; don't buy the small, cheap paperback version. I did and the tome's cheap print came off on my hands and made a general mess of things I came into contact with after reading.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Allium Cepa » Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:06 pm UTC

Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr by Nancy Isenberg. Even if you aren't really that interested in history it's a great book that actually does a good job of describing his life, as oppposed to most history books which have vilified him. Lots of interesting facts, and is also pretty easy to read compared to most history books.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mfank » Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:20 pm UTC

The Eight by Katherine Neville. Two intertwined stores, both about The Montglane Service, a chess set rumored to hold the key to ultimate power.

http://www.amazon.com/Eight-Novel-Katherine-Neville/dp/0345366239

wikipedia wrote:The Eight features two intertwined storylines set centuries apart. The first takes place in the 1970s and follows computer expert Catherine “Cat” Velis as she is sent to Algeria for a special assignment. The second is set in 1790 and revolves around Mireille, a novice nun at Montglane Abbey. The fates of both characters are intertwined as they try to unravel the mystery behind the Montglane Service, a chess set that holds the key to a game of unlimited power. A gift from the Moors to Emperor Charlemagne, these pieces have been hunted fervently throughout the years by those seeking ultimate control.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby NeverGrowUp » Fri Jul 10, 2009 3:44 am UTC

The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible by A.J. Jacobs

It's a hilarious and fascinating book about an agnostic (of Jewish descent) who, as the title says, attempts to follow all of the Bible's rules, from the compassionate to the seemingly insane. What Jacobs puts himself through is sometimes mind-blowing (the story of his attempt at "stoning" is reason enough to read the book) - he blows a shofar, wears tassels, and at one point attends what seems to be a Hasidic version of a rave party - but he provides a first-hand, modern, and insightful view of the Bible (he focuses on the Old Testament, but devotes time to the New Testament, as well); it's a great read for anyone who is interested in religion, regardless of personal beliefs.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mengelji » Sat Jul 18, 2009 4:50 am UTC

Read these and you'll travel in time.
Sometimes you'll be glad to get back home again, sometimes you wish you could stay.
Find out for yourself what they're about

- Seamus Heaney's translation of Beowulf
- Okla Hannali by R. A. Lafferty (any book or story of Lafferty's is worth the time!)
- Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban (read it aloud to yourself)
- A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (screw the movie, kubric blew it)
- Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis
- Brighton Rock AND/or The Third Man, by Graham Greene

Oh yeah, check out The Bartimaeus Trilogy too - Johnathan Stroud wrote the antidote to Harry Potter.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby MadZab » Sat Jul 25, 2009 8:54 am UTC

I recommend an easy-read, fun-ride dashing-air-battles steampunkish pirate-book:
Retribution Falls: Tales of the Ketty Jay by Chris Wooding.
First in a series of standalone-working books, it's energetic and lots of fun to read. A bit like Firefly with airships.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby RetSpline » Sun Jul 26, 2009 6:27 pm UTC

I'm most of the way through Don Quixote by Cervantes, and it's definitely one of the best books I've ever read. It's about as long (a bit shorter, actually) than Harry Potter 7, but it's much more dense.

I also picked up Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (so you know it's going to be good) on a whim at an airport before a flight to Germany and I spent the whole flight reading and re-reading it, ignoring all of my friends. It's a great book about an angel, a demon, the Antichrist, and the end of the world.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby waffle flop » Wed Jul 29, 2009 4:23 am UTC

The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America by Edmund Morgan is a wonderful set of scholarly essays that outline important movements in early American history, starting with Native Americans and continuing through the post-Revolutionary years. It's a great book to help boost your perspective for any high school or college history class. The author is an accomplished and witty old chap who has a great sense of humor and verbal flare - the text isn't dry at all. This book is definitely worth the effort!

:D
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mabufo » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:03 pm UTC

Could someone recommend to me a few books that are similar in content to Cryptonomicon? I enjoyed that book very much.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby McCaber » Sun Aug 02, 2009 11:51 pm UTC

Well, there is the Baroque Cycle. It's by the same author, only set in the Scientific Revolution era.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mabufo » Mon Aug 03, 2009 4:40 am UTC

McCaber wrote:Well, there is the Baroque Cycle. It's by the same author, only set in the Scientific Revolution era.


I'm more of a sucker for the computer stuff. (though I actually had started but never finished the baroque cycle - one day!)
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby ekzrated » Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:06 pm UTC

Gods... My local library has NONE of the books recommended thus far! I had to order them all... Before the year is up, I intend to have them stock them all. I've already had them deliver Crooked Little Vein. Next up... "Valis" and "Hope and Memory"!

man, the god-fearing folk in this town are going to hate me! Muah ha ha
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby sir2you » Mon Aug 17, 2009 4:31 pm UTC

The Skystone by Jack Whyte. An excellent book. I haven't finished the series yet, but it mixes very believable historical fiction with just a touch of fantasy. It's set at the very end of the Roman Empire in Britain. It's a back story to the whole King Arthur and Round Table story.

It's the first book in the Camulod Chronicles.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby sir2you » Mon Aug 17, 2009 4:38 pm UTC

Just thought of another one.

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

A must read. Fairly short book, but very good.

Also, A thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini. That was one of the most 'real lifey' novels I've ever read. The characters are developed so amazingly well.
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*•›„*•›„„‹•**•›„*•›„„‹•**•›„ a miracle, or as if everything is a miracle." - Einstein „‹•*„‹•**•›„„‹•*„‹•**•›„„‹•*
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby MaybeAndroid » Wed Aug 19, 2009 12:19 pm UTC

Genome by Matt Ridley is one of my favourite popular science books. It takes each of the chromosomes in turn and picks one gene found there to explore various topics in genetics, from disease and aging to intelligence and personality. It’s a fascinating book, and understandable to those with little knowledge of genetics, while at the same time not dumbed down too much for those who know a bit more. As well as providing interesting scientific explanations, it also touches on bigger issues such as free will and what exactly makes us human. It’s brilliantly written and really engrossing, and I highly recommend it.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby artifex » Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:39 am UTC

R. A. Lafferty wrote some excellent surreal science fiction. He had a writing style that could make a story about aliens erasing Los Angeles from history seem like an amusing tall tale. Like American folklore crossed with Lovecraft or The Twilight Zone. Very good stuff-- I'd highly recommend any of his short story collections.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Zohar » Wed Sep 02, 2009 8:42 am UTC

I just finished reading the second book of Tales of the Otori - Grass for his Pillow, by Lean Hearn. I read it right after the first book, Across the Nightingale Floor. It's a trilogy of books (and there's also a sequel and prequel). Fantasy set in a world heavily inspired by feudal Japan. It's pretty cool. As the vendor at the bookshop told me, it's a combination of fantasy and Shogun and she nailed it. If you liked either of those, I recommend this. However, I don't know how the series ends yet.

Speaking of which, if you haven't read Shogun by James Clavell, go and read it now.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mmmcannibalism » Sun Sep 06, 2009 12:43 am UTC

Siddhartha by Hermen Hesse; I wouldn't call it a short book but it isn't long. Very interesting spiritual literature, and the characters are very enthralling.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby saywolfagain » Thu Sep 10, 2009 9:50 pm UTC

MaybeAndroid wrote:Genome by Matt Ridley is one of my favourite popular science books.


It is great, isn't it? I'd also recommend Ridley's Nature via Nuture which I thought was just as entralling. Always fun to realise that things are even more complex than you'd thought.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby ice__101 » Mon Sep 14, 2009 8:33 pm UTC

I am going to have to recommend the Night Angel Trilogy.

The base of the story is about a young kid from the slums gets an apprenticeship with the best 'wetboy' (one step above assassin in the story) in the city, possibly the world. This may get him out of the slums, but he has to turn his back on everybody he ever knew and learn to navigate the perils of his new life. I don't want to get into it more than that as not to ruin any of the story for anyone.

This was my first introduction into Dark fantasy so to speak. Brent Weeks isn't afraid to go into the dirtier sides of what a place called 'the slums' could be like (rape, murder, prostitution, etc), but he goes just far enough to add to the story and not make it to gimmicky.

The characters are well fleshed out and the ending is unbelievably good.

On a separate note, I want to also endorse all the Chuck Palahniuk books mentioned: Choke, Fight Club, Invisible Monsters. The last one being my favorite. Great books, and Chuck is one messed up individual. I have also read Lullaby and Stranger Than Fiction: True Stories by him and do not recommend either.

Lullaby seemed too far fetched for even a Chuck Palahniuk novel. I usually like to think that while the world Chuck writes in is a completely messed up world, it
is not much unlike our own. This book does not fit in that category in the slightest.

Stranger Than Fiction is just a bunch of random stories of his life experiences mostly while researching books. If you are interested in learning about the author himself, this may work for you, but I found it really boring. This was the first book in a LONG time I was not able to get all the way through.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby folkhero » Fri Sep 25, 2009 9:01 am UTC

Does anyone know of a good non-fiction book about the Big Bang and the scientific reasoning behind it? I'm looking for something similar to Plil Plait's books, good solid science but not overly technical. I had a great conversation with my brother-in-law about cosmology and the beginning of the universe. He was rely interested in it, but had the general impression that the science behind what was happening right at the beginning was a bit wishy-washy. I cleared up what I could, but I'm certainly no expert, so I'd like to get him a good book that can explain it better than I could. Looking at some reviews of Simon Singh's book, and it looks like it covers history of science as much as science. My brother-in-law is a smart guy, but he doesn't do much reading, so I want something that might keep his interest a little better than a 560 page book with a lot of history in it. I realize that I'm asking for a lot, but if I can actually find what I'm looking for I'd be thrilled.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Vurma » Tue Oct 06, 2009 2:41 pm UTC

For any fans of fantasy books, i would definitely have to recommend The Eyes of God by John Marco. I was hesitant when i saw the title of the book at first, but after reading it and it's two sequels it has easily become my favorite series ever.

Another good one is The Summoner by Gail Z. Martin. another good fantasy book. this one is also in a series of currently three, and i dont know how many books she plans on writing but each one is just as good as the last.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby RD6 » Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:23 pm UTC

I need a book for a freshman inHigh School for outside reading. prefferably, science fiction. Also, try not to make it obscene or vulgar, and too mucch vocabulary is also a problem for me. :P Ifyou had to choose, go safe.

Please, I need help finding a book!
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Zohar » Sat Oct 17, 2009 8:26 pm UTC

Sci-fi? There's tons of stuff, but I think Asimov is amongst the most "readable" authors I've read. Try Foundation, by Isaac Asimov.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby mmmcannibalism » Sun Oct 25, 2009 4:05 am UTC

RD6 wrote:I need a book for a freshman inHigh School for outside reading. prefferably, science fiction. Also, try not to make it obscene or vulgar, and too mucch vocabulary is also a problem for me. :P Ifyou had to choose, go safe.

Please, I need help finding a book!


I'm going to throw Huxley's "Brave New World" out there as a sort of sci fi that is a literary classic.

On that route, perhaps Shelly's "Frankenstein".

Sorry if you are looking for something different, but I figure if you are reading for what appears to be class related some lit classics are a good idea.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby rose » Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:47 pm UTC

[quote="Vellyr"]I'll recommend Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins, the only book I've read that manages to be both hilarious and truly existential at the same time.

That is one fine book, indeed.

Might I add to this recommendation two personal favourites:

The Unnamable, by Samuel Beckett &
Gravity and Grace
, by Simone Weil


As to Beckett's, it is an uneasy monologue (reminded me of Pinter's "Mountain Language" play) and we are faced, challenged, really, as we understand of an unrooted character (albeit confined to a wine barrel) aiming (?) to liberate himself with what is given to him (and not much is given to him- a carrot here and there), his fragmented/fractured speech and/or self and .... it's been my riddle for years now.

Simone Weil: I'm currently reading her notebooks; "Gravity and Grace" is just acute as a philosophical stance and deserves on its own an engaged reading.
I have yet to discover the whole of her work.

Have a lovely day!
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby rat4000 » Mon Oct 26, 2009 7:31 pm UTC

RD6 wrote:I need a book for a freshman inHigh School for outside reading. prefferably, science fiction. Also, try not to make it obscene or vulgar, and too mucch vocabulary is also a problem for me. :P Ifyou had to choose, go safe.

Please, I need help finding a book!
Starship Troopers is rather good at being subtly awesome. And you can't go wrong with Fahrenheit 451.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby nsmjohn » Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:53 pm UTC

mabufo wrote:
McCaber wrote:Well, there is the Baroque Cycle. It's by the same author, only set in the Scientific Revolution era.


I'm more of a sucker for the computer stuff. (though I actually had started but never finished the baroque cycle - one day!)

For some books with more computer stuff, and less cryptography try Accelerando or Halting State both by Charles Stross.

As usual my recommendations are The Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe (bring a dictionary), The Night's Dawn trilogy by Peter F. Hamilton, and Forever Peace by Joe Haldeman.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby stacymcmahon » Mon Nov 09, 2009 1:03 am UTC

une see wrote:Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov. A John Updike quote as printed on the back cover of the version I have, "Nabokov writes prose the only way it should be written, that is, ecstatically." It's a beautiful book, filled with wondrous images, and quite funny as well. Humbert Humbert is possibly one of my favorite fictional characters of all time, and of course...the way Nabokov writes! Anyway, I recommend it to anyone. Absolutely one of my favorites.

this is one of my all time favorite books as well.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby modularblues » Mon Nov 09, 2009 6:45 am UTC

(1) "On the Nature of Human Romantic Interaction" by Karl Iagnemma.
Lyrical, haunting, powerful. Do not read all 8 stories in one sitting.

(2) Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris.
Relaxing and fun read. Many short chapters for those with short attention span :-)
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby rnbguru » Tue Nov 10, 2009 7:13 pm UTC

Wizard of the Pigeons by Megan Lindholm

It's a real clever take on bringing fantasy into the real world. It keeps things so ambiguous to the point where you don't know if it's a commentary on vietnam's effects on the soldiers, or if it's just a fantasy story in modern times.
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Re: Recommend a book

Postby Izawwlgood » Tue Nov 10, 2009 7:20 pm UTC

Long Price Quartet by Daniel Abrahams. It's delicious.
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