What are you readioactive now(and other book related stuff)?

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Postby Jack Mac » Fri Dec 15, 2006 11:17 am UTC

Just now finishing, again, Singularity Sky by charles stross.

Soon getting The Player of Games, by Iain M Banks.
Pure unadulterated awesome.
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Postby Verysillyman » Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:17 pm UTC

I read Oscar Wilde's "The happy prince" last night. very sad :'(
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Postby Fuolornis Fire Dragon » Sat Dec 16, 2006 2:58 am UTC

Verysillyman wrote:I read Oscar Wilde's "The happy prince" last night. very sad :'(
That makes sense. "The Happy Prince" is a sad book. "Green Eggs and Ham" is about turnips and potato salad. I like all the logic involved here.
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Postby Verysillyman » Sat Dec 16, 2006 6:48 am UTC

The happy prince is about a big statue of a prince, who sees all the people living in poverty in his city while he's made out of gold and emeralds etc, so he gets a swallow to help him out by pulling bits off and taking them to the poor people.
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Postby fjafjan » Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:32 am UTC

Verysillyman wrote:The happy prince is about a big statue of a prince, who sees all the people living in poverty in his city while he's made out of gold and emeralds etc, so he gets a swallow to help him out by pulling bits off and taking them to the poor people.


Oh, I read a childrens book version of that book then

I think that one ended happily though :S Somewhat sweet... yet sad
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Postby Verysillyman » Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:58 am UTC

Mmmm, I used to have a wonderful illustrated version, now I just have it as part of my "Most of the works of Oscar Wilde" volume. It does have a happy ending sortof. Bittersweet really.

Without giving away the ending to people who don't want to know,
All that's left of the prince is the lead heart, and the swalow dies because it's winter and cold. Then God sends an angel to find the two most beautiful things, and the angel brings back the heart and the swallow, and the prince and swallow get to live in heaven.
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Postby synaesthesia » Sun Dec 17, 2006 4:13 am UTC

fjafjan wrote:
Oh, I read a childrens book version of that book then

I think that one ended happily though :S Somewhat sweet... yet sad


Isn't it a children's story to begin with?

I have a really gorgeous book of Oscar Wilde's illustrated children's stories, I loves it.

What I'm reading right now:
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (totally beats 1984s ass!)
Fifth Business by Robertson Davies
Midaq Alley by Naguib Mahfouz

I tend to bounce between several books at once.
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Postby aldimond » Sun Dec 17, 2006 4:48 am UTC

synaesthesia wrote:Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (totally beats 1984s ass!)


Yes.

Well, Orwell's writing might be better, it's been a while since I read either, but the ideas in Brave New World seem more relevant these days.

I think Orwell did an essay, something like "The Politics of Language"? That's the next thing I should read, because I'm really interested in the topic. I can't decide whether I want to manipulate people with my words, be really straightforward and honest, or just analyze what other people say. But yay for knowledge about things that affect us every day!
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Postby synaesthesia » Sun Dec 17, 2006 5:18 am UTC

I kinda prefer Aldous Huxley's writing, too. But it's true, it's really the ideas that hold up better than Orwell's ideas in 1984. I find 1984 can come across a bit dated, but Brave New World is really innovative and still completely relevant.

That would be Politics and the English Language. It's a pretty darn cool essay.
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Postby programmerbrad » Sun Dec 17, 2006 7:37 am UTC

I am currently reading Eragon.

:oops:

I'm one of those people who reads books when movies based on books come out now...
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Postby aldimond » Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:13 am UTC

programmerbrad wrote:I am currently reading Eragon.

:oops:

I'm one of those people who reads books when movies based on books come out now...


It's OK; I wouldn't have even judged you for it, because I've never even heard of Eragon.

<--- maybe should get out more.
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Postby TheTankengine » Mon Dec 18, 2006 2:53 pm UTC

I've heard Eragon (the m0vi3) is especially craptastic, so, good luck with the book!
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Postby no-genius » Mon Dec 18, 2006 2:55 pm UTC

no-genius wrote:trying to get past the introduction this time
Being and Nothingness by Satre.

had it for over a year now? and no, i am not pretentious!


OK, I got past the introduction guys! (took me a week) :(

Now to the rest of the book.... ah, fuck!
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Postby karmasword » Tue Dec 19, 2006 5:54 am UTC

Ubik by Philip K. Dick
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Postby rachel » Tue Dec 19, 2006 6:03 am UTC

The Education of Little Tree by Forrest Carter
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Postby Pau! » Fri Dec 22, 2006 6:49 pm UTC

I just finished reading "What is Good" by A.C. Grayling. It's really more of a history of ethical philosophy than actual arguments for what is a good life, but it is interesting nonetheless.

I have just begun to read Smoke and Mirrors, by Neil Gaiman, and I am constantly impressed by his ability to tell a story. It is a collection of short stories, and they are fantastic. I will probably finish that book in a couple of days, after which I hope to pick up Labyrynthes by Jorge Luis Borges, which is a fascinating collection of short stories (I am very fond of short stories :)) which makes for excellent reading on mountaintops.

I really enjoyed Guns, Germs, and Steel. It made a lot of sense, and after thinking about it for a couple of days, I still couldn't refute most of his arguments.
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Postby Oort » Fri Dec 22, 2006 9:57 pm UTC

I'm reading Jurassic Park exclusively now. I love it.
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Postby zydehkim » Fri Dec 22, 2006 11:01 pm UTC

Last 5 books:
1)Cryptonomicon
2)Guns, Germs, and Steel
3)Singularity Sky
4)Snow Crash
5)The Diamond Age(right now)

All very good reads.
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Postby grim4593 » Sat Dec 23, 2006 9:31 am UTC

Oort wrote:I'm reading Jurassic Park exclusively now. I love it.


I must have read that and Lost World like 6 times (not joking). Love the books, the first and second movie did not do them justice. The third... lets not even go there :x
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Postby Olaf » Tue Dec 26, 2006 9:27 pm UTC

At the moment I'm reading the Earthsea quartet and a book on computational linguistics with some fairly boring name which currently escapes me. I also just reread Catch 22 and Axiomatic, a book of short stories by Greg Egan. I thoroughly recommend him as one of the best science fiction authors ever: 'Learning to be Me' is by far the most interesting and imaginative story about the nature of consciousness I've come across.
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Postby umbrae » Wed Dec 27, 2006 5:09 am UTC

zydehkim wrote: 4)Snow Crash


Yes! I loved Snow Crash.

Can you recommend any more stephenson that isn't Cryptonomicon?

Also, Brave New World and 1984 are both brilliant, I agree. I like 1984 for the writing style, but it comes off as a bit extremist. (Which of course is the idea of a dystopia. But to the point of seeming impossible.) I've read both multiple times. Soma seems hugely relevant these days.
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Postby aldimond » Wed Dec 27, 2006 7:22 am UTC

umbrae wrote:Soma seems hugely relevant these days.


It sure does.

Relevant as in, "Can I please have some now?"
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Postby jestingrabbit » Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:56 am UTC

I'm being boring and reading E.T. Jaynes' "Probability theory: the logic of science". Its interesting, and you can check out large parts of it here.
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Postby Alisto » Wed Dec 27, 2006 9:49 am UTC

umbrae wrote:
Can you recommend any more stephenson that isn't Cryptonomicon?


The Diamond Age.

My most recent books have been by Brandon Sanderson. Elantris, which is a stand-alone, and Mistborn, which is the first (and only one published) of a trilogy. He comes up with very unique magic systems.

I have to recommend Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler in every thread of this nature. These two books are not only wonderful reads, but they will completely destroy your faith in humanity only to restore it to a greater level by the ends. Amazing books.
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Postby superiority » Wed Dec 27, 2006 12:51 pm UTC

Letters from the Earth, Mark Twain. Brilliant, Voltaire-esque satire of religion.
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Postby fjafjan » Wed Dec 27, 2006 9:46 pm UTC

Just finished
"americans - This is how they are, this is how they think" by Staffam Elemdahö
and
"O alquimista" By Paulo Coelho

Both were decent, not great, yet had some good stuff in em
Am currently reading "the visit of the 'life doctor' (no idea how they translate that" by Per Olov Enquist
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Postby umbrae » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:20 pm UTC

aldimond wrote:
umbrae wrote:Soma seems hugely relevant these days.


It sure does.

Relevant as in, "Can I please have some now?"


Which would you like: xanax, prozac, paxil, lexapro, effexor, celexa, luvox, zoloft? Maybe some good old fashioned valium?

Seriously. Our society is fucked. This isn't saying anything against people who take these (I've considered it myself), but the fact that they are prescribed so often is reprehensible in my book.
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Postby william » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:23 pm UTC

The fact that we need them is the problem. Ah well, at least we're not as fucked up as we were in the 50s.
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Postby umbrae » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:30 pm UTC

william wrote:The fact that we need them is the problem.


Do we?
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Postby fjafjan » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:36 pm UTC

umbrae wrote:
william wrote:The fact that we need them is the problem.


Do we?

Yes, people do. Maybe not as much as used, and maybe other ways should be used to treat people, but yes. People do-.
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Postby Lani » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:40 pm UTC

I'm going to have to disagree with you on that, Fjan...that's not to say that the psychiatric diagnoses aren't legit, but that pharmaceuticals aren't the only answer, just the most publicized. There's a lot of research supporting cognitive-behavioral based therapies as more effective in the short and long term, but there's no industry to push exercise, healthy diets, proper amounts of sleep, meditation, and other therapies like there is for pharmaceuticals.
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Postby fjafjan » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:43 pm UTC

lani wrote:I'm going to have to disagree with you on that, Fjan...that's not to say that the psychiatric diagnoses aren't legit, but that pharmaceuticals aren't the only answer, just the most publicized. There's a lot of research supporting cognitive-behavioral based therapies as more effective in the short and long term, but there's no industry to push exercise, healthy diets, proper amounts of sleep, meditation, and other therapies like there is for pharmaceuticals.


I believe that, perhaps prodominatly in america, that there is an over use of medecine, but certainly there ARE cases where medecine is the solution, no?
How big this percantage is etc I am uncertain, but that it EXISTS I think is undoubtable.
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Postby jestingrabbit » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:46 pm UTC

lani wrote:I'm going to have to disagree with you on that, Fjan...that's not to say that the psychiatric diagnoses aren't legit, but that pharmaceuticals aren't the only answer, just the most publicized. There's a lot of research supporting cognitive-behavioral based therapies as more effective in the short and long term, but there's no industry to push exercise, healthy diets, proper amounts of sleep, meditation, and other therapies like there is for pharmaceuticals.


And I have to disagree with you lani. CBT, though good, is also more expensive than the drugs (at least here), and that makes a difference. Also, illness involving psychosis requires a certain amount of medication, specifically antipsychotics, at least in a psychotic phase.
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Postby umbrae » Wed Dec 27, 2006 11:46 pm UTC

fjafjan wrote:I believe that, perhaps prodominatly in america, that there is an over use of medecine, but certainly there ARE cases where medecine is the solution, no? How big this percantage is etc I am uncertain, but that it EXISTS I think is undoubtable.


Agreed wholeheartedly, with both you and lani.

I think that we overprescribe, to be sure. But there are of course cases where it's necessary - I don't think anyone's making the claim that everything can be solved just by 'thinking positive'.

Better living through chemistry is definitely plausible. But dealing with life with in pill form rather than confronting our problems head-on will hugely mar our society in the long run I think.
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Postby fjafjan » Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:07 am UTC

jestingrabbit wrote:
lani wrote:I'm going to have to disagree with you on that, Fjan...that's not to say that the psychiatric diagnoses aren't legit, but that pharmaceuticals aren't the only answer, just the most publicized. There's a lot of research supporting cognitive-behavioral based therapies as more effective in the short and long term, but there's no industry to push exercise, healthy diets, proper amounts of sleep, meditation, and other therapies like there is for pharmaceuticals.


And I have to disagree with you lani. CBT, though good, is also more expensive than the drugs (at least here), and that makes a difference. Also, illness involving psychosis requires a certain amount of medication, specifically antipsychotics, at least in a psychotic phase.


Hmm, First of all I don't always like having cost analysis as a major argument, quality if treatment comes first, then comes price.
Second of all is that there are alot of hidden costs of medecine, first of all succesful therapy will be more or less a 'one time cost' even though over a few years. Also the fact that all medecine has side effects, which not only are detrimental to the user, but also are a cost to society, be that a dulled mind, or headaches.
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Postby jestingrabbit » Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:26 am UTC

fjafjan wrote:Hmm, First of all I don't always like having cost analysis as a major argument, quality if treatment comes first, then comes price.
Second of all is that there are alot of hidden costs of medecine, first of all succesful therapy will be more or less a 'one time cost' even though over a few years. Also the fact that all medecine has side effects, which not only are detrimental to the user, but also are a cost to society, be that a dulled mind, or headaches.


Cost shouldn't come into it before efficacy, but it does. However, your argument about hidden costs is very persuasive.
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Postby fjafjan » Thu Dec 28, 2006 12:49 am UTC

jestingrabbit wrote:
fjafjan wrote:Hmm, First of all I don't always like having cost analysis as a major argument, quality if treatment comes first, then comes price.
Second of all is that there are alot of hidden costs of medecine, first of all succesful therapy will be more or less a 'one time cost' even though over a few years. Also the fact that all medecine has side effects, which not only are detrimental to the user, but also are a cost to society, be that a dulled mind, or headaches.


Cost shouldn't come into it before efficacy, but it does. However, your argument about hidden costs is very persuasive.


what do you mean "it does"? :P

It's an argument which I think is, as long as shared by a decent percantage of people, a decent argument for any polititian since they might depend on that percentage
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Postby aldimond » Thu Dec 28, 2006 4:09 am UTC

fjafjan wrote:what do you mean "it does"? :P


I think what 'e probably meant is, "If a patient has to foot a large part of the bill for treatment then cost is going to be a major consideration. If a government has to foot a large part of the bill for everyone's treatment then overall costs are going to be a consideration and it will push for doctors to lean towards the cheaper option."

It's not usually a matter of what the best treatment is and what a patient can afford; what a patient can afford is generally a sliding scale based on the importance of the perceived quality difference and how it compares to other needs and wants in life. Money is a very powerful tool for expressing priorities. If people are making bad treatment decisions based on a misunderstanding of the consequences or incorrect information on some level then perhaps professionals in the field need to focus on education. If they're acting in different ways than you would based on all the correct facts, then it's just simply their choice. I'm not very knowledgeable about the specific area, though. I can see how a powerful industry could skew common knowledge.
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Postby hermaj » Thu Dec 28, 2006 7:54 am UTC

I am reading The Da Vinci Code. So shoot me. To me, it is just a fiction book like any other mediocre fiction book, but I got the illustrated special edition for Christmas and I am enjoying having the pictures there to accompany the story.

After this I will again be tackling Orwell's 1984. I am determined to finish it this time!
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Postby fjafjan » Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:21 am UTC

hermaj wrote:I am reading The Da Vinci Code. So shoot me. To me, it is just a fiction book like any other mediocre fiction book, but I got the illustrated special edition for Christmas and I am enjoying having the pictures there to accompany the story.


*shoots you*

My point was not that cost will not enter the consideration, my point was that it needs not be the most important, it depends on public opinion since that is what govements rely on.
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