Three sentences in as many languages as possible

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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Velifer » Mon Nov 01, 2010 8:58 pm UTC

nike wrote:this can get only more and more amazing.
Thank you so much, it's been great fun!


Not quite sure if that means you're done, or still open to more translations.
Tok Pisin:

1. Where does it hurt?
Yu pilim pen we?

2. Since when?/For how long have you been like this?
Hamaspela de pen i stap?

3. Do you have a relative that speaks German?
Yu save wanblut long tok Jemeni?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby nike » Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:17 pm UTC

Velifer wrote:
nike wrote:this can get only more and more amazing.
Thank you so much, it's been great fun!


Not quite sure if that means you're done, or still open to more translations.


It should probably say

nike wrote:this can get only more and more amazing.
Thank you so much, it's so much fun!


Velifer wrote:Tok Pisin:

1. Where does it hurt?
Yu pilim pen we?

2. Since when?/For how long have you been like this?
Hamaspela de pen i stap?

3. Do you have a relative that speaks German?
Yu save wanblut long tok Jemeni?


Oh my gosh, that's amazing! Who did the translations, was it you? How did you learn Tok Pisin? Can I try and do the gloss? (I'm a historical linguistics major and we read about it all the time...) Does it look something like this?

1. Where does it hurt?
Yu pilim pen we?
You feel.TRANSITIVE MARKER pain where

2. Since when?/For how long have you been like this?
Hamaspela de pen i stap?
How much/how long the pain PARTICLE
- stap could be from stop, but then I don't know how it could indicate an amount of time, what would it be?

3. Do you have a relative that speaks German?
Yu save wanblut long tok Jemeni?[/quote]
You AUX relative ("oneblood"?) with you ("along") talk German?

("Something" like this?)
Thank you, this is so exiciting!!
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Velifer » Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:08 pm UTC

How did you learn Tok Pisin?

Too many slow days waiting for queries to finish. I learned from the Peace Corps' and other materials online.

Who did the translations, was it you?

Modified from Stephen Ward's 2005 document "Clinical Clerking and Examination in Tok Pisin" available online from http://www.tok-pisin.com

I'm by no means an expert, but then again, most "native" speakers aren't either, as it's always a second language. Even rough, those phrases would be understood.

"Hamaspela de pen i stap?"
How much (plural) | days | pain | ongoing.
(i stap is the present continuative/present progressive construction, it's what's happening now.)

Yu save wanblut long tok Jemeni?
You | have (from Fr. saver) | relative | belonging/capable of | language | Germany?
(I don't know a specific word for the German language, which is probably my failing, as Tok Pisin uses German as well as English and French.)
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Meteorswarm » Wed Nov 03, 2010 4:08 am UTC

I'm trying to figure out how to translate these into Classical Chinese, but my vocabulary is sadly limited (and also there is no word for Germany since it didn't exist in 400 BC, so I'm going with the modern version)

My attempts, likely not very accurate:
1. (I don't know what they actually used for pain, there are a few options in modern chinese, it'll probably just be something like 子何痛?)
2. 此何時始矣?
3. 有能言德言之親乎?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby arpee » Thu Nov 04, 2010 10:56 am UTC

Frater:
Plaskia es sentebenno?
Multikia tem?
Ti ni kones antroplogegermano in ni familia?

Glosa:
Qo-lo es dolo?
Ex-tem?
Qe tu es kognato ad persona ke parla Deutsch?

Ro:
avid eba sebnal?
ukte avit?
wi amid eba jabub ir ac lid Deutsch romiba?

Lingua Franca Nova:
De do es tu dole?
De cuando?
Tu relate con un parlor de deutx

Toki Pona:
pilin ike pi sina li lon seme?
ona li kama e tenpo seme?
jan sina pi seme li toki e toki Tosi?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby nike » Thu Nov 04, 2010 11:03 pm UTC

arpee wrote:Frater:
Plaskia es sentebenno?
Multikia tem?
Ti ni kones antroplogegermano in ni familia?

Glosa:
Qo-lo es dolo?
Ex-tem?
Qe tu es kognato ad persona ke parla Deutsch?

Ro:
avid eba sebnal?
ukte avit?
wi amid eba jabub ir ac lid Deutsch romiba?

Lingua Franca Nova:
De do es tu dole?
De cuando?
Tu relate con un parlor de deutx

Toki Pona:
pilin ike pi sina li lon seme?
ona li kama e tenpo seme?
jan sina pi seme li toki e toki Tosi?


:shock:
That's awesome and puzzling at the same time. Are you fluent in all of those languages (I'm aware they're constructed), is that your hobby, did you just sit down with a grammar and vocab and figured it out by yourself?

(I like constructed languages if they're not used for actual communication, but then, I'm into diachronic linguistics, constructed languages don't have as much to offer in that regard ;-) But for my collection, it's still awesome. (I'm running out of adjectives, btw. Fantastic? Fabulous? Fantabulous?)
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby tendays » Mon Nov 08, 2010 8:24 pm UTC

tendays wrote:I was actually planning to make an audio recording of those consonants (that are all audibly different!), as well as, for the OP, of those three sentences, but am lazy, and also feel weird making funny noises in front of my computer.

Well, today I am in a mood of making funny noises in front of my computer, and no one is at home :)

For the OP, Finnish:
finnish.mp3
(110.2 KiB) Downloaded 137 times
Malayalam:
malayalam.mp3
(135.1 KiB) Downloaded 131 times
Portuguese:
portuguese.mp3
(96.73 KiB) Downloaded 124 times
Tamil:
tamil.mp3
(113.47 KiB) Downloaded 129 times

I have a stuttering problem, particularly with sentences starting with "t" or "k", so the last Portuguese one starts louder because I had to put more strength to get the sound out, and then I forgot to make the sentence sound like a yes/no question, with tone rising at the end...

goofy wrote:So you're saying that ഥ is aspirated [ð], and ത is [ð]?
Yes.
I'm trying to imagine how you aspirate a fricative.
Blow more air while and after you're making the sound? The following recording is me trying to say "ഇത ഇഥ ഇദ ഇധ ഇത്ത ഇത്ഥ":
ita-itha-ida-idha-itta-ittha.mp3
(63.26 KiB) Downloaded 124 times

Could it be that ഥ is [θ] as in thin?

No, [θ] as in thin never appears in Malayalam as far as I know.
It's hard to find detailed information about Malayalam anywhere.
Tell me about it :-/ I actually ordered a "Malayalam self-taught" book a few years ago and it was a total disaster. I found an acceptably good one in Bangalore. But the only real progress I made was with regular lessons given by a Malayalee friend, and then with my ex-fiancée.
Movies are helpful as well.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Mazuku » Fri Nov 12, 2010 5:25 am UTC

I cannot believe that with all the exotic languages as well as the obvious languages people seem to know, that no one has posted in Welsh yet.

1. Ble anafa?
2. Er pryd? Achos fel ddyhea fuest cara hon?
3. Gei a 'n berthynol a speaks Almaenwr?
Allmächtige Exzentrikerin3

...................................
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Erl Kaarik » Tue Nov 16, 2010 5:27 pm UTC

Estonian:

Kus teil valutab? (Where does it hurt for you?)
Mis hetkest saati?/Kui kaua see juba nii on olnud? (From what moment forwards?/ How long has it been like that?)
On teil sugulasi kes saksa keelt räägivad. (Do you have relatives who speak german?)

Enjoy :P
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby nike » Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:27 pm UTC

Erl Kaarik wrote:
Enjoy :P


sweet! thank you so much!
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Jumble » Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:29 pm UTC

I'm going to try for Cornish:
pyma 'n galar
Pygemmyshes?
Cafas why kerens nep cows Almaynek

(warning: I only speak a few stock phrases so those a dictionary translations and probably awful. Also, as the last person to really speak Cornish as a native tongue was Dolly Pentreath, who died in 1777, I don't think your friend will be able to do much to help her!)
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby arpee » Tue Nov 23, 2010 11:47 am UTC

Tika:

kui puana puati pila nala.

kui nuita tipu.

tupi kapi nai kapi tuiku tika panili pikua.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby PicNick » Tue Nov 23, 2010 3:45 pm UTC

Here's Filipino, if it helps.

Saán* [po] ba ang sakít?
Where is the pain?

Kailan [po] ba tong úmpisa?
When did this start?

Mayroon** [kang/ninyo*** pong] pamílya (o kaibígan) na marúnong mag-German?
Do you have family (or friends) that speak German?

* pronounced as two syllables, sa-an.
** pronounced meron.
*** nearly always contracted to "nyo".
Acute accents are used to denote stress. (e.g. ma-RU-nong, not MA-ru-NONG.)

[po] is generally inserted as a form of respect. Since he is a doctor serving his patients, he should use this unless he is speaking to a child. At the final one, "kang" would be the informal, while "ninyo pong" is the formal/respectful.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby jano » Wed Nov 24, 2010 3:20 pm UTC

stolid wrote:Potentially more ways to ask in Spanish.
1. ¿Dónde se duele?
¿Dónde está el dolor?

2. ¿Desde cuándo?
¿Cuándo empezó?
¿Hace cuánto tiempo empezó [el dolor]?

3. ¿Tiene [usted] un pariente quien/que habla alemán? (You could put familia instead of un pariente.)
¿Habla alguien cercano alemán?

Optional stuff in brackets.


I think that it might be improved a little:
1. ¿Dónde le duele? ("se" is incorrect - should be "le" [or "te" if taking to a child])
"¿Dónde está el dolor?" is grammatically correct, but sounds a little akward - I'd stick with the first option.

2. The three options are OK, the first one is the most natural.

3. ¿Tiene [usted] un pariente que hable alemán? (not "quien", and not "habla" but "hable") (As stolid states, you can put "un familiar" or "familia" instead of "un pariente".) The alternative "¿Habla alguien cercano alemán?" is akward - even if you change the word order to "¿Alguien cercano [a usted] habla alemán?" - I'd drop it.

So IMHO, it should be:
1. ¿Dónde le duele?

2. ¿Desde cuándo?

3. ¿Tiene familia que hable alemán?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby stolid » Wed Nov 24, 2010 8:14 pm UTC

jano wrote:I think that it might be improved a little:

Always happy to have correction. It's tempting sometimes to put se for 3rd person with those reflexives (since the infinitive has one on it), but I might finally be kicking the habit. I would generally say the first one each time too, just giving different options.

What's wrong with using quien instead of que on #3? And why use the subjunctive conjugation? Point me at a resource if you'd rather not explain it yourself because that genuinely irks me.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby jano » Thu Nov 25, 2010 7:40 am UTC

stolid wrote:Always happy to have correction. It's tempting sometimes to put se for 3rd person with those reflexives (since the infinitive has one on it), but I might finally be kicking the habit. I would generally say the first one each time too, just giving different options.

What's wrong with using quien instead of que on #3? And why use the subjunctive conjugation? Point me at a resource if you'd rather not explain it yourself because that genuinely irks me.

My knowledge of grammar is practically zero, but I'll try to explain with examples:
* As for 1, I think that it should be "le" as the question is directed to the same person who experiences the pain. As a matter of fact, probably it should be "¿Dónde le duele [a usted]?" - at least in Spain. It is possible (don't know) that in Latin America "¿Dónde se duele [usted]?" may be used. But then, maybe my explanation is not good, because in similar cases you would use "se", as in "¿Cómo se llama [usted]?". Afterthought: compare this last sentence with "¿Cómo le llaman [a usted]?". Maybe it has something to do with transitive / intransitive, or direct vs indirect objects, but as I said, my knowledge of Spanish grammmar approaches nil.

* In 3, I think that "hable" conveys more the meaning "who can / is able of speaking" while "habla" conveys "who usually speaks in / who now is speaking ". You could also say "¿Tiene[usted] un pariente que sepa alemán?" or "¿Tiene[usted] un pariente que sepa/pueda hablar [en] alemán?". Surely "habla" would be perfectly understood, but I think "hable" is better.
As for the "quien", I think it is generally used when referring to the subject in a (direct or indirect) question, like "¿Quién eres?", "¿Quién va a conducir?" or "Digame quién mató a Kennedy". Possibly, from a grammatical point of view, it may be correct to use "quien" in the example sentence, but (at least in my environment (Spain)), it does sounds awkward. You would say "La persona que ganó las elecciones ..." but not "La persona quien ganó las elecciones ...".

Hope it helps :?:
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Erl Kaarik » Fri Nov 26, 2010 12:26 pm UTC

I asked the Võro Institute for a translation in the Võro language/dialect.

Kost teil halutas? (Where does it hurt for you?)
Mis aost täpsähe?/Ku pikält taa joba nii
om olnuq? (From what moment forwards?/ How long has it been like that?)
Teil sugulaisi om, kiä saksa kiilt kõnõlnuq? (Do you have relatives who speak german?)

Please keep in mind that Ä is not spelled as it is in german, actually just like a in the beginning of "anger"
We need some bread, but it's really hot outside and I can't be bothered to walk 'round the corner...
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Iulus Cofield » Sun Nov 28, 2010 5:26 am UTC

So, [e]?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Monika » Sun Nov 28, 2010 12:43 pm UTC

I think anger starts with [æ].
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Iulus Cofield » Mon Nov 29, 2010 12:22 am UTC

That's why I asked.

In my dialect [æ] becomes [e] before [ŋ], so I wasn't sure what the vowel was elsewhere.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby tendays » Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:59 pm UTC

Erl Kaarik wrote:I asked the Võro Institute for a translation in the Võro language/dialect.

Kost teil halutas? (Where does it hurt for you?)
Mis aost täpsähe?/Ku pikält taa joba nii
om olnuq? (From what moment forwards?/ How long has it been like that?)
Teil sugulaisi om, kiä saksa kiilt kõnõlnuq? (Do you have relatives who speak german?)
Funny how that is still so close to Finnish: teil = teilä, mis = missä, ku = kuin, pikält = pitkää, nii = niin, om = on, olnuq = ollu, sugulaisi = sukulaisi, saksa = saksaa (in the partitive) for the most obvious...
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Erl Kaarik » Tue Nov 30, 2010 3:36 pm UTC

Yea you pronunce it [æ].
What's funny is that the finnish word for government is the estonian word for mold. :P
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby goofy » Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:35 pm UTC

tendays wrote:
goofy wrote:So you're saying that ഥ is aspirated [ð], and ത is [ð]?
Yes.
I'm trying to imagine how you aspirate a fricative.
Blow more air while and after you're making the sound? The following recording is me trying to say "ഇത ഇഥ ഇദ ഇധ ഇത്ത ഇത്ഥ":
ita-itha-ida-idha-itta-ittha.mp3



I just noticed this. Thanks for making this recording. To me, ത sounds like [ð] and ഥ like [θ]. ത്ത sounds like [t̪] and ത്ഥ like [t̪ʰ]. But I'm a native English speaker out of practice with discriminating these sorts of things. I guess it's possible that ഥ could be [ðʱ], that is a fricative equivalent of ധ. That would be interesting.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby tastelikecoke » Sun Sep 11, 2011 12:05 pm UTC

PicNick wrote:Saán* [po] ba ang sakít?
Where is the pain?

Kailan [po] ba tong úmpisa?
When did this start?

Mayroon** [kang/ninyo*** pong] pamílya (o kaibígan) na marúnong mag-German?
Do you have family (or friends) that speak German?

It would be better if: Kailan ba ito nag-umpisa?

and: Mayroon kang/kayong kamag-anak (o kaibigan) na marunong mag-German?

ninyong is for 2nd person plural possessive. and no pronouns are formal iirc :?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Nogg » Fri Oct 07, 2011 2:45 am UTC

As a brazilian I must say that the portuguese version is much different from what it should be.

1. Where does it hurt?


1) Onde é que está a doar?


The verb doar is different from the verb doer. The first means to donate and obviously does not fit the sentence.

i. Onde dói? / Onde está doendo?

Those would be the correct forms. Both mean exactly the same.

-x-

2. Since when?/For how long have you been like this? (Whatever is easiest to put in the respective language)


2) Desde quando doa?


The same goes here. The sentence above means: For how long have you been donating? and does not fit the sentence too.

ii. Desde quando dói? / Desde quando vem doendo?

These also mean exactly the same.

-x-

3. Do you have a relative that speaks German?


3) Têm alguém na familha que fala alemão?


This one is a bit far from what it should be.

Starting with Têm was not a good choice for two reasons: 1) The way it's written indicates plural which differs from the original sentence. It should have been withou the graphic signal: Tem... ? 2) By not using the pronoun one can get confused because it could also mean something like Is there a relative that speaks German? which is not the purpose. 3) We have a word for relative. It's parente. Some people have a hard time with it because it looks like parent and both mean someting somewhat related. 4) Asking the question without the pronoun você sounds weird to me. It would be like asking Have a relative that speaks German?. Who?

Você tem algum parente que fala alemão?

This would be the correct version. It fits perfectly. I don't have a mic now but I can upload the audios if you guys want.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby The Milkman » Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:25 pm UTC

The Hedgehog wrote:Here's the Hebrew translation, if you're interested:

1. ?איפו כואב לך
[Eiffo koev lecha?]
(where does it hurt?)

2. ?כמה זמן זה כואב לך
[Kama zman ze koev lecha?]
(how long has it hurt?)

3. ?יש לך קרוב משפחה שדובר גרמנית
[Yesh lecha karov mishpacha she dover germanit?]
(do you have a relative that speaks german?)


Bear in mind that all words with "ch" in them (such as "lecha" and "mishpacha") are pronounced like a long h sound and not in the usual English pronunciation.


I just want to point out a couple things:
1. All "lecha" would become "lech" when you're talking to a female.
2. "Dover germanit" is more a "speaker of German", as in, an official spokesperson for the German language. To say "who speaks German", you would want to say "sh'midabber germanit" - שמדבר גרמנית
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Eugo » Mon Oct 10, 2011 10:42 pm UTC

amans wrote:Serbian/Српски
3. Do you have a relative that speaks German?
Imate li rodjaka koji govori nemacki?
имaте ли рођака који говори немачки?


The Latin is incorrect. Should be

Imate li rođaka koji govori nemački?

I have compiled a long list of words where using the old "dj for đ" kludge just doesn't work because both d and j are pronounced separately (and I didn't touch the dialectal differences like deca/djeca/đeca - if I did, the list would grow into a small book). And I have a yet longer list of examples where omitting diacriticals creates confusion. Links to both lists available on request.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby relic5.2 » Thu Jan 12, 2012 4:15 pm UTC

historyofkiwi wrote:Irish Celtic
Cá ea an pian?
Where is the pain?
Should be: Cá bhfuil an phian?

Conas mórán uair ó an pian tosaithe?
When did the pain begin?
Should be: Cathain a thosaigh an phian?

Déan tú cnaipe muintir sin labhair Gearmáinis?
Do you know of family that speaks German?
Should be:An bhfuil aithne agat ar an muintir a labhraíonn Gearmáinis?


Enjoy!

Such... horrible grammar. I can't even work out how the mistakes in the second and third were made!
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Monika » Thu Jan 12, 2012 4:51 pm UTC

Then correct them and don't just complain.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby jaap » Thu Jan 12, 2012 6:17 pm UTC

Monika wrote:Then correct them and don't just complain.

relic put his corrections in the quote.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Monika » Thu Jan 12, 2012 7:37 pm UTC

Oops, I didn't see that, sorry.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Fire Brns » Fri Jan 13, 2012 4:13 pm UTC

Meteorswarm wrote:I'm trying to figure out how to translate these into Classical Chinese, but my vocabulary is sadly limited (and also there is no word for Germany...
Degguo? German(language) de wen; German(person): degguo ren.
Ni you jia shuo de wen ma? (You have family speaks german?) 你有家说德文吗?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Diemo » Fri Jan 13, 2012 4:34 pm UTC

relic5.2 wrote:
historyofkiwi wrote:Irish Celtic
Cá ea an pian?
Where is the pain?
Should be: Cá bhfuil an phian? Pronounced: Caw will on feen

Conas mórán uair ó an pian tosaithe?
When did the pain begin?
Should be: Cathain a thosaigh an phian? Pronounced: Caw-hin ah hus-ah on feen

Déan tú cnaipe muintir sin labhair Gearmáinis?
Do you know of family that speaks German?
Should be:An bhfuil aithne agat ar an muintir a labhraíonn Gearmáinis? - Not quite. This means do you know family that speak german?, but muintir doesn't really mean family, more relatives that you grew up with. Clann would be a better word here. So the question would be: An bhfuil clann agat a leabhraíonn Gearmáinís (anseo)? brackets optional, means: Do you have family which speak german (here)?. Pronounced: On will cl-on at a lowe reen Grr-mon-eesh (on-shuh)?

Enjoy!

Such... horrible grammar. I can't even work out how the mistakes in the second and third were made!


To be honest, anyone you get who can speak Irish will also be able to speak English as well.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby relic5.2 » Sun Jan 15, 2012 7:27 pm UTC

Diemo wrote:Not quite. This means do you know family that speak german?, but muintir doesn't really mean family, more relatives that you grew up with. Clann would be a better word here. So the question would be: An bhfuil clann agat a leabhraíonn Gearmáinís (anseo)? brackets optional, means: Do you have family which speak german (here)?. Pronounced: On will cl-on at a lowe reen Grr-mon-eesh (on-shuh)?

To be honest, anyone you get who can speak Irish will also be able to speak English as well.


The sentence they had posted was "Do you know of a family that speaks German?" which is what I translated (although the OP was different to that).
Teaghlach is more the relatives you grew up with (or lived with... it's the people in the household), muintir is your extended family (cousins, etc.) whereas clann refers to your descendents... Your sentence is fine grammatically, but means more "do you have children/grandchildren (here) who speak German?" - your aunts, uncles, and cousins aren't covered by clann, only by muintir.

(Unfortunately, I don't have a copy of Ó Dónaill on hand to give exact definitions :/ but [url=http://www.irishionary.com/search/clann/]clann[/i] and [url=http://www.irishionary.com/search/muintir/]muintir[url] are validated and should be sufficient)

Edit: not able to use the url tag yet :/

Edit 2: To be honest, anyone you get who can speak Irish will also be able to speak English as well. cad faoi Yu Ming as "Yu Ming is ainm dom"? :wink:
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Diemo » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:25 pm UTC

Interesting. I would definitely use clann in this situation, rather than muintir (though that said, I doubt that I would ever really use muintir, maybe it is not from my dialect? Just sounds wrong).

The sentence they had posted was "Do you know of a family that speaks German?" which is what I translated (although the OP was different to that).


Aye, I was going off the original post.

Teaghlach is more the relatives you grew up with (or lived with... it's the people in the household), muintir is your extended family (cousins, etc.) whereas clann refers to your descendents... Your sentence is fine grammatically, but means more "do you have children/grandchildren (here) who speak German?" - your aunts, uncles, and cousins aren't covered by clann, only by muintir.


I would disagree with the meaning of clann given here, I would think that the uncles, aunts etc are all covered by clann. It just means family. Teaghlach is your household for sure(brothers, sisters, maybe grandparents, etc). Muintir is, uh, not used? ;)

Cad faoi Yu Ming as "Yu Ming is ainm dom"?


Pffff. He can speak Chinese, so I'll edit that to anyone who can speak Irish can speak another major language :D.
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby Fire Brns » Mon Jan 16, 2012 7:08 pm UTC

Diemo wrote:
Cad faoi Yu Ming as "Yu Ming is ainm dom"?


Pffff. He can speak Chinese, so I'll edit that to anyone who can speak Irish can speak another major language :D.

I don't regognize that, is that cantonese?
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby relic5.2 » Wed Jan 18, 2012 7:02 pm UTC

Diemo wrote:Interesting. I would definitely use clann in this situation, rather than muintir (though that said, I doubt that I would ever really use muintir, maybe it is not from my dialect? Just sounds wrong).

[...]

Aye, I was going off the original post.

[...]

I would disagree with the meaning of clann given here, I would think that the uncles, aunts etc are all covered by clann. It just means family. Teaghlach is your household for sure(brothers, sisters, maybe grandparents, etc). Muintir is, uh, not used? ;)

[...]

Pffff. He can speak Chinese, so I'll edit that to anyone who can speak Irish can speak another major language :D.


It's unfortunate that there's no clear-cut way to translate "family" into Irish, nach bhfuil? And I'm tending to agree with you that clann might be better than muintir (in fact, I'm wondering if teaghlach might be suited if the meaning "Do you know that German speaking house?" is considered) for the fact that when I read over it again, I translated muintir as "people" - as if to say that there's a German speaking ethnic group in the area!
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Re: Three sentences in as many languages as possible

Postby The Mockingbird » Fri Jan 20, 2012 8:36 pm UTC

Ukranian is pretty similar to Russian, but not exactly the same. This is probably not perfect, since I studied a half dozen slavic languages at the same time.

1. Де болить? (Where is pain?)
2. З якого часу? (Since When?)
3. У вас є відносна, хто говорит по-німецьки? (Do you have a relative who speaks german?)
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