Makeup 101

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Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:26 pm UTC

Welcome to the Makeup 101 thread! I wanted to start off by posting this series of pictures, and asking you guys what part of the process of this whole thing you'd like to talk about first. I took inspiration for this look for a kind of 50's glam kind of look. Now I include the previous steps because for full disclosure. I hate when all you see is the "before" and "after" and they don't tell you it actually took a multitude of steps. Note: I did this stuff during the course of the day I was throwing a party. In between running errands, cleaning and cooking, this is what I would also be doing. If I actually tried to do all of this at once, I would never put myself through it again (or at least be very reluctant to do so). Also, sorry about the blown out webcam pictures, it was the easiest way to capture it quickly while still getting everything done that day.

The beginning. Made a mistake and put on tinted lip balm instead of regular lip balm. Not a good look for me. We'll consider this the "before" picture.
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After doing my eyebrows. I try to leave them as full as possible while getting all those stray hairs. My goal is to have a defined "edge" to the eyebrow. I feel as though this make a nice frame for my face.
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After waxing the rest of my face. I do a part of my hairline as well. Again, it's all about clean edges,
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Changed into my dress, put on the base makeup for my party look. That's primer, foundation, concealer. I use primer because I have old acne scars and the purpose is to kind of fill that in so the foundation has more of an even surface to sit on.
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Completing the rest of my makeup and my hair. I do eye makeup, bronzer, and a scooch of blush. Hair is curled using a 1" straightener. Takes about 20 minutes, but is a good ROI as you'll see by the next day's look.
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Next day, after my curls had been slept on and waved out a bit. Now I have a fun look for the next day as well.
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So! Tell me what you want to know!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby sophyturtle » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:32 pm UTC

It's okay to leave things on for the next day? Recently I started the whole eye makeup thing which ends up with me pulling at my eyelashes trying to get enough of the mascara off to avoid raccoon face the next day.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Mon Nov 28, 2011 11:43 pm UTC

Sometimes I leave stuff on if I forget to wash my face, and bad things haven't happened yet? It all comes off in the shower the next morning...but I also do have some eye makeup remover. If you have waterproof/water-resistant eye makeup, the trick is to use gentle lotion/baby oil/eye makeup remover. It works a lot faster than water. Sometimes if I make an oops with the mascara while I'm applying it, I'll use a Q-tip with a little dab of lotion on it to clean up the oops without wrecking the rest of the makeup.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Tue Nov 29, 2011 12:33 am UTC

PictureSarah wrote:Sometimes I leave stuff on if I forget to wash my face, and bad things haven't happened yet? It all comes off in the shower the next morning...but I also do have some eye makeup remover. If you have waterproof/water-resistant eye makeup, the trick is to use gentle lotion/baby oil/eye makeup remover. It works a lot faster than water. Sometimes if I make an oops with the mascara while I'm applying it, I'll use a Q-tip with a little dab of lotion on it to clean up the oops without wrecking the rest of the makeup.


So much this. Just put a little baby lotion or oil or whatever on a cotton ball/tissue/whatever and wipe over your eyes. And the rest of the face, come to think of it, it's a good way to get all the makeup off before washing you face, so you can use just a gentle cleanser instead of depending on it to take all of the stuff off of the face. I like to wash my face before going to bed every night. The only times I've not are times I've been drunk or whatever and forgot before I've fallen asleep. If you have acne prone skin, sleeping in makeup is definitely a no-no.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Cathy » Tue Nov 29, 2011 2:52 am UTC

Can I get a step-by-step how-to on natural eye shadow vs dramatic eye shadow? I can't seem to do a natural look, and my dramatic is, well, too dramatic.

Also: Pros and cons of powder, liquid, and cream foundations. I have powder and liquid types, but the liquid always seems to go on too heavy and the powder seems to emphasize hair on unfortunate places.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Tue Nov 29, 2011 3:53 am UTC

Cathy wrote:Can I get a step-by-step how-to on natural eye shadow vs dramatic eye shadow? I can't seem to do a natural look, and my dramatic is, well, too dramatic.

Is there a particular color/palette you were going for or are you thinking more neutrals? Do you have a color that's like a shade or two darker than your natural lid color? Use this color to sweep along the eyelids. Take a slightly darker color for the crease and outside corner. Don't go too far in to the crease, I only do about a third to a half of the way in. If you have a highlight shade, you can put in on inner corner of your eye and along your brow.
Whole picture
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Close up
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Try lining with a color other than black, my favorites are browns and purples, but you can experiment with blues and greens too. This mellows out the line a lot, and makes the look much more daytime friendly. Here is an example of using ONLY purply mauve eyeliner
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Try it! I will try to post more of a breakdown on what to do when the look specifically asked for in this thread isn't one that I happen to already be wearing!
Cathy wrote:Also: Pros and cons of powder, liquid, and cream foundations. I have powder and liquid types, but the liquid always seems to go on too heavy and the powder seems to emphasize hair on unfortunate places.

Mix the liquid foundation with some lotion before applying. You'll get a nice semi-sheer coat of whatever color to even everything out without too much weight. Powder is good for those days you know you're going to sweat everything off or if you specifically want more of a matte look (or if you want to cut down on shine if you have naturally oily skin). I hate cream foundations because they embody everything I hate about liquid foundations only much worse.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:15 am UTC

Adding to what Shro said -
On natural eye makeup: Many of the eyeshadow palettes you can buy at the drugstore will actually have numbers for the order of application stamped into the eyeshadow, and will have diagrams on the back, which can be helpful. But basically: use a neutral color slightly lighter than your skin on the inner corners of your eye, in the center of your eyelid, and on your brow bones as a highlighter, and use a neutral color slightly darker than your skin in the crease of your eye. Blend it all together well with a clean brush. Then use a dark color (non-black is less dramatic, as Shro said, so look for browns, purples, greys) to line your eyes. I usually use an eyeliner brush with eyeshadow, which gives me a much softer, less dramatic line than a pencil, liquid or gel, and I line from the outside corner of my eye about halfway along the top, and about a third of the way along the bottom. Lastly, apply mascara and curl eyelashes. Ta Da!

On foundation: Have you tried tinted moisturizer? I use one that is under $12, and is preservative-free, paraben-free, synthetic fragrance-free, SPF 15, and cruelty-free. I suppose the downside is that it doesn't have a ton of staying power, but it's very light and sheer, and I'm pretty happy with it.
Last edited by PictureSarah on Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:38 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Cathy » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:17 am UTC

Thank you, Shro! I'll give it a try and post step pictures like you have within a couple of days. I really appreciate this thread!

Also, you have absolutely amazing eyes. :shock:
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby ShortChelsea » Tue Nov 29, 2011 4:36 pm UTC

This thread is amazing. :D
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Alder » Wed Nov 30, 2011 12:38 am UTC

I'm going to be coming back to check on this, I'm fairly terrible with makeup...

One thing that I do (which I discovered years back when a friend was training to be a beauty therapist, and was experimenting on all available friends!) is have my eyelashes tinted. I don't really like using mascara - I'm terribly short-sighted, and putting the brush near my eyes when I really can't see makes me cringe - and I get it done in blue-black, which suits me pretty well, and lasts for a couple of weeks. I forget the difference that it makes, and then love the look again when I get it done, it means I can just stick on some powder foundation and coloured lip balm/gloss during the day but still look as if I've made quite an effort. :D

If I'm doing eyeshadow as well, which is really only if I'm going somewhere special, I'll use a clear mascara (so it doesn't matter if I accidentally tap my cheek with it or something) which clears any eyeshadow dust off my lashes and curls them a little.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PM 2Ring » Wed Nov 30, 2011 4:30 am UTC

Nice thread, Shro.

PictureSarah wrote:Sometimes if I make an oops with the mascara while I'm applying it, I'll use a Q-tip with a little dab of lotion on it to clean up the oops without wrecking the rest of the makeup.

Try removing the oops with a dry Q-tip first. If it's a water-based mascara, that should get almost all of it. If it doesn't, you can follow up with a Q-tip that's slightly dampened with baby oil / lotion / sorbolene, and then dry the spot with a dry Q-tip. But it's best if you can avoid putting such makeup solvents on top of your eyeshadow or powder & foundation: just clean the spot with a dry Q-tip, and if necessary, hide any remaining traces with a little eyeshadow (or pressed powder, depending on location).

A slight digression:
Makeup isn't simply a matter of changing the colour of various regions on your face, you are also trying to create a kind of optical illusion. A core principle here is that our visual processes tend to treat areas of uniformity or smooth color / tint change as background regions, so we only consciously see the locations which aren't uniform or smooth, unless we pay close attention. And even then, we're easily fooled. :)

Repairing an errant mascara splodge using lotion (etc) can change the overall texture of your makeup at that spot and so it can cause the makeup at that spot to behave differently to the surrounding makeup. In effect, it acts as an artificial blemish, and breaks the principle of uniformity mentioned above.

On a related note, powder can safely be applied on top of liquid makeup, but liquid on top of dry is (usually) a recipe for disaster - the liquid "curdles", creating a region that will not look smooth, and can be prone to caking or cracking.

While on the topic of mascara, a dry mascara brush is a very useful tool. Just get the brush from an old mascara bottle, wash it with warm soapy water, and rinse it thoroughly. Use the dry brush on your lashes before applying your mascara. This will sweep off any stray particles of eyeshadow and give the lashes some preliminary shape & alignment. Then, as soon as you've applied your mascara, go over the lashes again with the dry brush. This will help spread the mascara more evenly over the lashes and it will remove blobs and other excess mascara. It's important to do this immediately after you've applied the mascara, before it has a chance to set. FWIW, the dry brush can even be used to good effect to clean up errant mascara splodges before you use the Q-tip techniques discussed above.

The dry brush can also be used if you need to fix up your mascara later during the day / evening. Or the next morning. :) Applying fresh mascara on top of existing mascara is generally a Bad Idea. It has a tendency to create blobs and can even make the lashes twist in weird ways... The fresh mascara and the dried mascara react in ways that require chaos mathematics to fully analyse. :)

Of course, like all makeup brushes, the dry mascara brush should be cleaned regularly. And it's probably a good idea to wipe off the excess mascara that it picks up after each use; you can just use your fingers for that.


On the topic of makeup removal, try gently wiping off some of the surface makeup first with tissues. You may be surprised at how much eyeliner will come off onto the tissue. :) And a lot of the eyeshadow will come off, too. This will make subsequent removal with baby oil (etc) less messy. When using oil and a cotton ball to remove makeup use just enough oil to dampen the cotton and dissolve the makeup. If you use too much oil you end up smearing the makeup around and it ends up taking longer to clean it all off.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Sungura » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:34 pm UTC

oooh my faces!!!

Okay so Shro taught me a bit about 2 yrs back, and I got some help with eye stuff from another friend...and anyway now I haz three versions of what I do depending on how dressy I want to go. The most dressy takes 5 min. Figured might help ya'all.

Me before anything!
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Yeah I still get acne and crap and usually that is all I want to smooth over...ya know? Make it less prominant.
So these are my basic tools. The stuff in the bottle is a liquid foundation, it doesnt make my skin break out. Neutrogina. I took photos of everything so you can find it if you want to use it. I apply it with a round pad thingie. I use the multicoloured pad from Neutrogina for tops of cheeks, and I find a touch on my nose and upper forhead for some dimension helps too. That is the more "taned" one, they make "blush" coloured pallets too, I dont have one but I do have the two colours of mineral blush which I chose to use today, the brighter colour on the apples of the cheeks, the darker blended from apples out to the ear along that bone line and again I put a bit of that darker on on my nosecrest and top half of forhead for dimension. I find in the summer months I like the "tan" palette better as my face tans quickly and its more with that skin tone of the summer, but in the winter I am kinda pale, so the blush tones work better.
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And it makes this, a nice even skintone face that really looks like I did nothing to it, but I know what I did, and I like it better =)
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Okay. Eyes. Sometimes Im lazy and dont want to mess with it. Sometimes I feel like making them pop. I have really lovely eyes (I think) so I like to frame them the best of everything on my face. Here are some tools of my trade...I use a dark copper eyeliner (Almay) and matching mascarea. I like the revelon eyeshadows, as they are a creamy paste and the powder doesnt stay worth shit but the paste does a good job. They have like 6 colour pallets those are my fav two. Ill talk more about them later.
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My blank eye, now youll note that really no top lid shows. All those eye shaddow directions and commercials and photos people have a friggin top lid that shows. I have learned it is no use doing anything to my upper lid. It smears and makes a mess and no one sees it anyway unless they can catch a blink. Not Worth It. So, for eyeshaddow purposes I ONLY work with what is above the bone, aka under eyebrow above eye, which is all you can see on my face.
Image

This is my basic eye. Dont even bother with shadow. Just eyeliner, which i do the outer 1/3 of the upper eye, smudge along the waterline from "inside" to "outside" corner. I do about 1/5 of the lower lid waterline, again working in to out. This just defines the corner of the eye and gives it dimension. Becuase of how no-upper-lid I have, especailly on the inner side of my eye, anything more on the top is pointless, and anything more on the bottom closes my eye rather than opens it. I then throw on some mascarea. Three strokes (to cover them all, 1 for each outer, middle, inner), top lashes first. I re-ink the brush between top lashes 1 and top lashes 2 but then DONT reink it. Lower lashes are thinner and fewer and more delicate. If you re-ink, it glumps on. Ew. (of course if your lower lashes are very lush, edit this, Im just saying it this way as thats pretty rare and yay you!)
Image

Today for these photos I just went with simple on my eyes. When I do shaddow I use two colours, same scheme (normally) one darker one lighter. Lighter goes on the INSIDE (nose-side) of the eyes to lighten and pop the eye. I sweep it up about 1/3 the way and then use the darker, blending in middle 1/3. I used two from the purply pallet, the one on the very left was my bright and the one 3 from the left was my darker. These basically are skin-neutral on me and just add a bit of sparkle and lighten up the inner corner. So sorry to say it basically doesnt show on camera, but in person youd see some shinypop
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Now a note: I like playing sometimes and my eyes are blue with ltos of green I can control that with what colorus i put by my eyes and what I wear. Sometimes when I want to have fun, I use those green and blue shaddows as eyeliner (remember otherwise cant see anything on my upper lid) and so again, because they are the creamypaste they do work for this I find. I tried being silly with the purple too but that just made it look like I had a black eye.

If I want a more dramatic eye look, I use those shiny browns on the left side of the top shadow box. Same light/dark match as I explained, but the browns are less skin tone to me and stand out more.

Okay so now we are to this face!
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This is usually as far as I go on a normal day (actually usually I stop at sans eye shaddow). Up to this point though ive spent maybe 3 minutes. 4 if I did a blurp with the mascarea to clean off :P

If I am going out though...woo party time. To make any remaining face uneveness fade to the background by giving my lips a nice bright colour in the same colour (zittystuff is red, but pale under the foundation, but eyes just dont see it at all with some lip-pop!) and just pop my features (I find making my lips pop makes my eyes pop more) even more and look more fancy...simple tinted lip gloss.
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which gives this look
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So less than 5 min for the Fancy Face look. And SHAZAMMMM. Basically my fav features of my face poped, and yet it doesnt look like Im wearing a shitton of makeup. Just how I like it.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:35 pm UTC

Shro wrote:Hair is curled using a 1" straightener. Takes about 20 minutes, but is a good ROI as you'll see by the next day's look.


How, exactly, does one curl hair using a straightener? I own neither a curling iron, nor a straightener, but I've been considering buying some sort of hair tool for doing things to my hair other than brushing it. From previous experience, though, it takes me *hours* to curl all of my hair. I know you are a lady with thick hair as well, so if you know a way to do it relatively quickly, I want to know! Is it just practice? My hair is pretty thick, but it's also VERY straight, and is not fond of curling.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby podbaydoor » Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:36 pm UTC

Sungura, that bit about the upper eyelid was very helpful. I have the single-fold eyelid and I've noticed that putting anything on there, including eyeliner, just disappears when I open my eyes. I only get visible color if I keep going practically to my eyebrows.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Thu Dec 01, 2011 2:44 am UTC

PictureSarah wrote:
Shro wrote:Hair is curled using a 1" straightener. Takes about 20 minutes, but is a good ROI as you'll see by the next day's look.


How, exactly, does one curl hair using a straightener? I own neither a curling iron, nor a straightener, but I've been considering buying some sort of hair tool for doing things to my hair other than brushing it. From previous experience, though, it takes me *hours* to curl all of my hair. I know you are a lady with thick hair as well, so if you know a way to do it relatively quickly, I want to know! Is it just practice? My hair is pretty thick, but it's also VERY straight, and is not fond of curling.

I use pretty much the same technique as this. On her Asian hair, the whole thing takes like 3 minutes. On thick hair, I've come up with a couple of things to help make it easier. (When I said twenty minutes, I mean twenty minutes for the curls. I did a time trial today for the wavy look and it took me 10 minutes, so I stand behind my original estimate of 20 minutes for the fancy pants curls. Part of it is probably practice, but part of it is method.)

1) Curl dirty hair. The last day before you wash it is a good time to rock the curls. My hair gets all oily and doesn't look all that good straight at this stage anyway, so it's a good time to wear this style. You might want to blow dry your hair upside down for a sec though to get some volume in the roots and brush it out thoroughly to distribute all the oils. This is a big key (I think) in getting your curls to set and stay (good dog).

2) Partitioning the hair before you begin. I like to section it off into four to six sections and clip and or tie the hair out of the way. I start at the bottom layer of my hair, and work my way up through the sections. Taking three minutes to pin up my hair like this saves me a lot of time, since I'm not scrambling at the end to get those tiny pieces that have escaped, as they invariably do if I freehand it.

3) Product. Something that smoothes hair and keeps the moisture locked in with the heat. I like to apply whatever product I'm going to need as I take it out of the section to then curl it, so I know I don't miss any pieces.

4) I only curl the bottom bits of my hair. Especially on the bottom layers, if I curled from the tippy top of the hair, I'd have this weird pouf around my cheekbones anyway. This saves a TON of time, as I'm only curling like the bottom third of my hair. The only layer that's really done completely is the top layer.

5) Alternate the direction of the curl. In the video, you'll notice that she curls away from her face on one side and towards her face on the other side. Don't do this! Alternating the direction of the curl means that the two curls adjacent will be in the opposite direction. This way, they don't tend to blend together into one big curl/wave thing later on.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Sat Dec 03, 2011 8:22 pm UTC

Thanks! I am totally going to try this, in the event that I actually get a flatiron. In the meantime, I have documented my making-up process, in case anyone cares.

1) Absolutely nothing at all on my face.
Spoiler:
Photo 13.jpg


2) Tinted moisturizer applied all over face. Bronzer applied on cheekbones (back into hairline), bridge of nose, chin, and temples, and blended in well.
Spoiler:
Photo 16.jpg


3) Light plum shades of eyeshadow applied, including eyeliner, using a dark plum and an eyeliner brush
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Photo 20.jpg


4) Last step! Curled eyelashes, applied mascara, brushed out clumps and curled again. Applied pink lipgloss.
Spoiler:
Photo 29.jpg

Takes maybe 10 minutes? And I'm kind of slow. This is kind of my "fancy" face, though. Often, I just do moisturizer, and sometimes do tinted moisturizer plus bronzer/blush and mascara, and skip the eyeshadow alltogether.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby podbaydoor » Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:36 pm UTC

When you apply the tinted moisturizer, how much to you blend/rub it into your skin? Do you treat it like paint, like it's not supposed to absorb into the skin or something?
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:39 pm UTC

I pretty much just treat it like regular moisturizer and rub it in, I think. I tend to use a tiny bit more than regular moisturizer, because if you rub it too much it makes thinner spots and thicker spots, but it's really sheer, so it's not much of a problem usually. If you have some fairly dark blemishes to cover, you probably have to use concealer *with* the thinted moisturizer, because it's not going to really *cover* anything, just sort of smooth things out. Sometimes I will put a smidge of powder on my nose and the corners of my forehead to get rid of super shininess.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby podbaydoor » Sat Dec 03, 2011 9:55 pm UTC

Okay. That makes sense. It sounds like tinted moisturizer + concealer is the lighter option than foundation. The few times I've had foundation on, I didn't like that crusted, caked-on feeling.

As for concealer, when I was looking at the ones Shro recommended, some of them were colored green and others were skin tones. Should I go for the green corrective tint or a skin tone tint?

What about primer? When should I have to wear it? Just for special occasions? Just on my eyelids?
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PictureSarah » Sun Dec 04, 2011 12:02 am UTC

The green-toned concealers are specifically for neutralizing reds, so they might be good for covering acne, but they're not great for say, under-eye circles or a sun blotch or something. I've never really used the green concealers, although I did have a green powder palette once for reducing general rosiness. I use the skin-colored concealer, and for me, the liquid kind with a little dabby brush thing, or the cream kind used with a concealer brush both work better than the sticks, which tend to go on too thick and be prone to drying out in my experience. I usually dab on a spot of concealer and let it dry for a few minutes before blending it in. If I blend right away, it tends to sort of disappear on my skin and not really cover anything.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PM 2Ring » Sun Dec 04, 2011 12:42 pm UTC

Green concealer is wonderful. It makes most red spots and blotches disappear. You can apply it either before a foundation or tinted moisturizer base, or after. Doing it before is more subtle, of course, but it gives you more margin for errors. If its on top of your base, then you will need to cover it with powder... unless you're going for a Vulcan look. :)
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby podbaydoor » Mon Dec 05, 2011 4:16 pm UTC

I don't want to mess around with powder, so I'll give it a try that way.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby crowey » Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:35 pm UTC

My make up routine if anyone is interested (spoilered for big). It would seem that without my glasses I have crazy eyes, I blame this on trying not to squint and over compensating.
Spoiler:
No make up, with and without my glasses
Image
Image

Foundation, concealer & powder plus highlighter on my cheekbones.
Image

Black eye liner and mascara (this is where I stop if I'm not trying to make an impression)
Image

+ lipgloss, gold eye liner and eye shadow (MAC lucky green with MAC golden lemon pigment on top) and a bit more mascara.
Image
Image

My hair is naturally curly like that so I just put a little bit of coconut oil on to control the frizzyness.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Fri Dec 09, 2011 3:31 pm UTC

I would love to see you in some teal eyeliner. And coral blush, but not at the same time. Unless it was a darker, saturated teal with a bit of sparkle. One of the most difficult things for me is learning how to experiment more with color, but I still mostly only do blues (teals) and purples.

Also, I found these here article about the femininity/masculinity of faces. According to the article, increased facial contrast is more often perceived as female. So things like darkening around the eyes and the lips without darkening the skin maximize contrast, making someone appear more feminine.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Cathy » Sat Dec 10, 2011 12:40 am UTC

Shro wrote:Also, I found these here article about the femininity/masculinity of faces. According to the article, increased facial contrast is more often perceived as female. So things like darkening around the eyes and the lips without darkening the skin maximize contrast, making someone appear more feminine.

That is really interesting. It seemed to me that the reason I thought the face with more contrast looked more female was because it had more defined lips and eyes - which turned out to be the contrast thing. :shock: Mind blown. Very cool.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby jillton » Mon Jan 16, 2012 4:24 am UTC

Great thread!! Go you!!

I have a concealer related question. I'm very fortunate in that I generally have quite clear skin, the odd time I get a spot or blemish I have my amazing green concealer which is just magic!!

For bigger more noticeable blemishes I've been told that I need a pink based concealer rather than a yellow based concealer because I'm quite pale and it always seems to me that conealer doesn't really do much, apparently this is why. Has anyone here ever used a pink based concealer before/know of ones that are good?

I think a lot of you are based in the States - I live in Ireland so only the big (read - expensive) names will be here as well.

Cheers!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Mon Jan 16, 2012 4:53 am UTC

Anyone else crazy about dark red lips with black eyelids&mascara? :)

My make-up motto is mostly "if it ain't bold, it ain't makeup". :D
Actually, I use black eyeliner, [sometimes] eyeshadow and mascara almost on a daily basis, which isn't really so bold. However, if I'm in the mood, I use red or dark red lipstick, which may look bold. And classy, definitely classy. And subtly goth/dark, I like that. Lately I'm experimenting with purple lipstick, but it's not really me. I'm also curious about using vibrant colored eyeshadows. I'm speaking yellow, green, orange, purple, blue... perhaps even all together. :)

Btw, besides eyeliner, eye pencils, eye shadow, mascara, lipsticks and seldom lip-liners, I don't use other forms of makeup. I hope I won't ever wish to use some kind of tanning makeup or such. I find the idea of that on my face pretty repulsive.

P. S. I find it quite awkward to write such a post on xkcd. I guess I'll blush about it when I wake up. :oops:
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby charolastra » Mon Jan 16, 2012 12:55 pm UTC

I'd just like to say that everyone in this thread is absolutely gorgeous, with or without makeup. Thank you for sharing your secrets, and your faces!

Right now I'm getting over the holy mother of all breakouts with about 8 cystic zits on my chin, cheek, and forehead. They'll be red for awhile so I'm experimenting with ways to make them blend in.

I used to think that I had to use a liquid foundation coupled with concealer to make things smooth out. Oh ho, not so! Tinted moisturizer works well (and I've taken to making my own with my moisturizer and foundation mixed together) to smooth everything out - plus you can apply with fingers and it won't look cakey. But first! The most important thing for me is to make sure I moisturize even before I put on the tinted moisturizer. I also put on a primer beforehand too - both of these steps help keep the tinted moisturizer from clogging my pores.

My two latest product obsessions for blemishes are Benefit's Erase Paste and Boing concealer. For the more uneven blemishes, I use Erase Paste since it's a thick liquid (gel?) concealer. For flatter blemishes, I use boing because it's not so heavy. Both are applied with a brush, which makes it easier to blend in to the surrounding skin as well as helps to avoid them looking cakey.

After that, I use my summer powder (which is about a shade too dark to wear on my much-paler-than-usual winter skin) as a bronzer- just brushing it over my cheeks, the bridge of my nose, the center of my forehead, and my chin. This helps set the concealer and foundation as well as gives my face more dimension. It's also nice to not have to swap out ALL of my makeup depending on the season and my level of pale.

I'll take pictures when I'm getting ready to go out tonight!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby lucrezaborgia » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:26 pm UTC

I know this is the OP's thread, but the best site I've ever used for makeup and learning how to play around with it is this: Link removed. Please do not link to pornography. -lanicita

Yes it's a porn site...but it really does a good job of illustrating how to use makeup!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PerchloricAcid » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:56 pm UTC

I know it's offtopic, but I really feel the urge to share this.
I read a bit through her site, and she says she's got a really high IQ and is into quantum physics! Whoah!
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby lucrezaborgia » Mon Jan 16, 2012 6:18 pm UTC

PerchloricAcid wrote:I know it's offtopic, but I really feel the urge to share this.
I read a bit through her site, and she says she's got a really high IQ and is into quantum physics! Whoah!


She had a full scholarship to Rutgers and played piano at Carnegie hall as a teen. She isn't the stereotypical dumb porn star by any means.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Princess Marzipan » Mon Jan 16, 2012 10:09 pm UTC

lucrezaborgia wrote:She isn't the stereotypical dumb porn star by any means.
Actually, most of them aren't...

I mean yes, their lines make them sound like they're all sharing the same handful of neurons, but porn stars aren't necessarily dumb.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby lucrezaborgia » Mon Jan 16, 2012 10:16 pm UTC

Princess Marzipan wrote: porn stars aren't necessarily dumb.


Hence my usage of "stereotypical"
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Shro » Mon Jan 16, 2012 11:55 pm UTC

lucrezaborgia wrote:
Princess Marzipan wrote: porn stars aren't necessarily dumb.


Hence my usage of "stereotypical"

They also have a pretty "stereotypical" porn star look. This is a LOT of eyeshadow. Also, I would never, ever EVER follow her advice about lips. No matter what. Do NOT line your lips with liner two shades darker than the color. Also, figure out if you can pull off massive amounts of color on both your eyes and your lips. The rule of thumb is usually to go bold on only one or the other. Also, figure out if you're comfortable wearing so much makeup, I know that a lot of makeup, especially when I first started trying stuff out, would make me feel very clown like and uncomfortable with the whole idea of makeup. It's not something I consider attractive on myself, but I guess I can see the appeal.
Image

Edit: I'm really glad this thread got bumped, because earlier, I wanted to post this beauty secret.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby lucrezaborgia » Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:34 am UTC

Oh I def don't go all out with the whole routine and I don't do my lips. The site helped me in that it very clearly defined what goes on which areas and I had not found any sites that were so straightforward using lines and whatnot. I tone it down way more for natural look depending on colors. The fun part is experimentation!
Spoiler:
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby natashatasha » Tue Jan 17, 2012 4:20 am UTC

Hello, I was pointed here from the LGBTIQQA thread (I'm an Australian transwoman), and I think this is a brilliant idea for topic of conversation, especially since I've no idea how it works. I've never used make-up before, and have no idea where to start ... my current routine is wash face, shave, wait half an hour and then cleanse, but beyond that, I have no idea where to start with all the differences in types, brands and colours. I have no sense of 'fashion' in any regard, with respect to clothes, hair or make-up.

Anyway, after my cleaning/cleansing routine (please tell me if I'm doing it wrong), what am I suppose to do? I'm sorry if I sound really ignorant, but I am really ignorant.
Because I understand colours are important, I have very pale skin (for an Australian), bright blue eyes (depending on lighting, of course), and very curly (almost always frizzy) ash-brown hair. At least, I think it's ash-brown, I've not asked anyone whose in abetter position than I to judge.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Virtual_Aardvark » Tue Jan 17, 2012 5:25 am UTC

I would recommend a layer of liquid foundation to start. I'm a fan of covergirl self blending but feel free to experiment with different brands. When in the store test the foundation on the underside of your wrist to see if it blends. Some people follow up with a layer of powder or use powder only, but that seems to be a matter of preference. When applying foundation be sure to cover a little of your neck below the jawline to make it seem more natural.

For your eyes, avoid super dark liners as they may wash out your eye color. Dark browns and greys will compliment better. If you want to use eye shadow stick to blues (darker than your own), purples, taupes, and greys. Silver, turquoise and fuchsia will make your really pop. It sounds like you're a "spring" or "summer" in makeup parlance so lean towards that.

If you want to play with lips I would start with clear and pink tinted gloss. If you want to try lipstick start in shades of natural pink and test them on your wrist to see if you like the color.

Blush often comes in palettes of three. Find a set that's relatively light and wont stand out too much. When applying it start by just brushing a little on the apples of your cheeks (the bits that puff out when you grin.

I would avoid doing a complete face until your really comfortable with each part. Many women only wear foundation or eyeliner or lipgloss for day to day functions.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby Cathy » Tue Jan 17, 2012 6:42 am UTC

Natasha, I'm kind of like you with the blue eyes, brown hair, and light skin. Depending on how your eyelids fold, I'd suggest not using eye liner at all! It looks terrible on me because my pale skin makes it stand out too much.

Here's some of the makeup I use: I try lots over time and mix and match.

Spoiler:
Loreal Truematch foundation and blush
Image

Spoiler:
Loreal Lipgloss
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Spoiler:
Covergirl blue eyes shadow palette
ImageImage

Spoiler:
Mary Kay brushes
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And as for the hair, to help frizzy, right after a shower and the first squeezing of the hair, I rub a tiny bit of this stuff into the ends and underneath parts of my hair. It helps the fly aways.
Spoiler:
John Frieda Frizz-Easy (tiny purple bottle)
Image


Also, I tie it up as it dries because it keeps it from flooofing into a triangle away from my head.
I twist it up into a bun like so:
Spoiler:
Take top and bottom half of hair and twist together:
ImageImage
Tie into place at back of head with no-hurt (metal free) elastic tie:
ImageImage

This ensures that the parts down to about my chin are relatively straight or wavy, and that the bits at the end still have some pretty in them.

Here's my super late morphing from no makeup to some makeup. (If the pictures are superbig, I'm sorry, tried to resize them on photobucket!)
Before:
Spoiler:
Image


Foundation:
Spoiler:
Image


Blush and Lipgloss:
Spoiler:
Image


Eyeshadow and hair down:
Spoiler:
Image
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby PM 2Ring » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:49 am UTC

natashatasha wrote:I've never used make-up before, and have no idea where to start ...
[...]
I'm sorry if I sound really ignorant, but I am really ignorant.

Well, we all have to start somewhere. :) It's certainly harder for trans women - most cis women get the opportunity to pick up makeup skills from their female family members and friends. Also, most women who wear makeup have spent a fair amount of time looking at other women's makeup, which helps to create an internal knowledge base of what works and what doesn't.

Most trans women need to learn how to cover beard shadow. If you intend to go full-time, give some serious thought about permanent beard removal. Electrolysis is still the best way, although laser-based methods are getting quite good, too. Both of these techniques take time and a fair chunk of cash. Female hormones / testosterone blocker will help, but they won't stop a beard that's already started. But if you're young enough they can stop your beard from getting thicker. And they will give your skin a more feminine texture.

Virtual_Aardvark wrote:I would recommend a layer of liquid foundation to start. I'm a fan of covergirl self blending but feel free to experiment with different brands.
[...]
I would avoid doing a complete face until your really comfortable with each part. Many women only wear foundation or eyeliner or lipgloss for day to day functions.


What she said. I like Cover Girl and Maybelline products, but I've also been quite happy with supermarket brands. You probably have a few Priceline stores in your vicinity. They have a good range and the staff are fairly helpful, IME.

It's a Good Idea to practice a lot, especially with fiddly things like eyeliner or lip liner. Don't expect to create cosmetic perfection on your first few tries! :) Eyeliner and lip liner can be easily removed with a cotton ball moistened with baby oil, so you can practice doing it every day, if you want to.

Anyway, here's a quick step-by-step guide to basic trans makeup.
Spoiler:
Moisturizer.
This helps keep the skin flexible and helps keep the foundation on the surface, so it doesn't develop that caked-on look, and (hopefully) will help prevent lines from forming in your foundation. A little bit goes a long way. I often use sorbolene cream, or even plain vitamin E cream, mixed with a tiny bit of water, but you might want to try a product that's specifically made as a pre-makeup moisturizer.

Beard cover.
There are various ways to hide beard shadow. The most effective beard cover products (eg Dermablend) work best with a fairly thick foundation. That may be ok for a glamourous evening makeup look, but they may be too heavy for a more casual daytime look, especially in the warmer months.
The old standby method is to use a cheap orange lipstick on the beard shadow. The orange neutralizes the bluish tinge that beard hairs impart to the skin. Cheap lipstick is preferred for this because more expensive lipsticks tend to contain moisturizers, which give the lipstick a thicker & richer look on the lips, but which aren't wanted for beard cover. You may need to experiment with different shades to find what works best for you.
You probably don't need to cover the whole beard area - just the areas that have noticeable beard shadow, like the chin, mustache and side-burns, and possibly the throat, if you have a very heavy beard. Your foundation and blush should be enough to cover the cheek areas.
Dot the lipstick over the area then blend it with a fingertip. Use a different fingertip to remove bits of lipstick that are not on the beard area, eg just above & below the lips. Use enough lipstick to make it look like you've got a mild case of sunburn.
You are not just trying to modify the colour of the beard area, you're also attempting to make it look smoother by disguising the dottiness of the beard hair follicles.

Concealer.
Concealer isn't essential, but it can certainly be helpful. I love pale green concealer. :) It's excellent at hiding red blemishes and it can also be applied (very lightly) over the beard cover to achieve a more natural colour balance. A thin zone of concealer around the lips can be blended into the beard cover to make sure that the beard cover isn't touching the lips. This will also improve the contrast of the lips themselves.

Foundation.
Traditional foundation is a liquid, although in recent years powders (eg, Bare Minerals) have become very popular. Powder foundations are good for a light "no makeup" look, but they may not work so well in conjunction with a beard cover, although you may like to experiment with them. If so, you might like to try using an orange-y blush powder as a beard cover instead of the orange lipstick.
Modern liquid foundations are water-based, so they are a lot lighter than the old-fashioned oil-based formulations.
Liquid foundation can be applied using the fingertips, a sponge, or a brush. I mostly use a sponge, and when I'm finished applying and blending it I also go over it with a clean dry sponge (or brush) to remove excess.
Apply foundation to your whole face and throat, blending it at the sides and base of your neck. Don't forget to put some on the front of your ears and your forehead.

Powder.
Pressed (or loose) powder is normally applied on top of liquid foundation. After applying your foundation, wait a minute or so for the foundation to dry out a bit before applying powder, but the powder does help the foundation to set; it also improves its optical qualities, making it look more natural. Cover all of your foundation with powder except your lower eyelids - powder here can make the lower lids look wrinkly. After applying the powder, brush off excess. Try to keep the brush strokes vertical, preferably going in a downward direction.

Eyebrows.
Eyebrows are tricky. If you intend to go full-time you'll probably want to pluck or wax them, to give them a more feminine shape. At this stage, you might like to experiment with eyebrow pencil to make the texture more even and slightly darker, but I advise to not worry too much about them at this stage, at least until you feel very confident with doing eyeliner.

Eyeliner.
As Virtual_Aardvark said, a grey or brown eyeliner pencil is probably the best for your skin & eye colours. Also, a mistake is easier to clean up with a grey eyeliner than with an intense black one. Try to get a smooth even line as close to the lash line as possible. After you've drawn the liner on you can go over it lightly with a cotton bud to smooth it out and smudge it, giving a softer effect. Also use the cotton bud to clean up the outside of the line (ie the opposite side to the lashes) and to fix any mistakes.
It can be difficult getting the accurate hand control required to draw the lines you want, especially at first when you're a bit anxious about having a pencil so close to your eyes. You can make your hand steadier by cupping the elbow of your drawing arm with the palm of the other hand. You may also find it helpful to not hold your head totally still but to rotate it slightly while drawing, thus sharing this tricky coordination task between your hand and your head.
Different brands of eyeliner have different textures. You may have to try a few different brands before you find one that works smoothly for you and that interacts well with your foundation. Also, eyeliner is temperature sensitive. An eyeliner that applies smoothly in winter may not work so well in summer: it'll stick and jump, creating a dashed line instead of a smooth line. Some people combat this by putting their eyeliner pencil in the freezer for at least half an hour before use. :)
Several posters in this thread have mentioned liquid or gel eyeliners. They are good, but they're a little harder to apply neatly, and IMHO a pencil is better when you're trying to achieve a subtle effect.

Eyeshadow.
The standard approach is to put a light shade above the eye crease, blending up to the eyebrow. Then put a dark shade in the eyelid crease, and then a medium shade on the eyelid itself, with a thin line of the medium shade just under the eyeliner on the lower lid. I like to use shades of brown, and even if I use another colour I still use the browns as a base and blend the other colour on top of the medium brown.
I normally apply my eyeshadow using the small sponge applicators that are often supplied with the eyeshadow, but I use a fine brush to blend it nicely.

Mascara.
Mascara is a bit fiddly, but it's totally worth the effort. :) I won't go into details here, since it's already been adequately discussed in the thread.

Blush.
Blush (aka rouge) is easy to do. It adds depth and colour to the face. It's also easy to over-do. If you already have pronounced cheek bones, proceed with caution. :) Once again, practice makes perfect.

Lip liner and lipstick / lip gloss.
Lip liner gives definition to the lips, and also makes the task of applying lipstick or lip gloss easier, by giving you a solid line to work to. Lip liner is a bit easier to do than eyeliner, but it still requires practice to get it smooth and symmetrical. First, line your lips. Next, apply the lipstick or lip gloss. Then use the liner again like a paintbrush to blend the lipstick or lip gloss to the line. Now smudge your lips lightly on a tissue to remove excess. Be carefully not to rub, or you'll smear your lippy! If you like, you can now set the lippy by carefully applying some pressed powder around the border of your lips, re-apply the lip liner (and possibly the lippy) to cover areas on the lips themselves that got powdered. At this stage, I like to finish off with another application of pressed powder over my face (avoiding the eyes, of course). This makes the blush a bit more subtle.

Ta da! You're finished. Almost. Now it's time to paint your nails. :) And don't forget to dab on some perfume...

Whew! That took a bit longer to write than I expected. I probably could've made up two faces in the time it took me to write all that. :)

Edit: A couple of extra comments re: beard cover, foundation and eyeliner.
Edit2: How did I forget mascara?!
Last edited by PM 2Ring on Mon Jan 23, 2012 9:45 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Makeup 101

Postby lucrezaborgia » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:42 pm UTC

Regarding makeup brushes. Once you get into a good routine, getting some good brushes really makes it all a lot easier and you tend to use a lot less makeup. Around this time of year, the makeup retailers are selling off their holiday brush travel kits and Sephora has a really good one.

Eyelid primer is great too!
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