Parlons Français ! [French practice]

For the discussion of language mechanics, grammar, vocabulary, trends, and other such linguistic topics, in english and other languages.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Prelates, Moderators General

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Maralais » Thu Feb 09, 2012 3:12 pm UTC

Well, I think the inversion is a bit more formal(langage soutenu est la terme correcte, je pense), while adding est-ce que is more common. Though the difference is very, very little.

I think Comment tu t'appelles is also more of a "langage familiale", where you can use just intonation to ask questions. It's already a long question, making it even longer with a est-ce que would be boring :D
Maralais
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:56 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:19 am UTC

Monika wrote:Can someone explain me when to form questions "question word est-ce que subject verb?" and when to use the short "question word verb-subject?"

E.g. Why is it: Qu'est-ce que c'est?
But: Qui est-ce?

Somewhat different: Why is it Comment tu t'appelles? and not Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles?


(Note there is typically a space before a question mark in French).

There are indeed several ways of constructing the same question:

1 - with no subject/verb inversion, only intonation makes it different from a statement (except maybe the presence of a question word). This is the least formal form, and I probably use it 90% of the time in my everyday speech. This is not something we normally write, except on informal media like the xkcd forum. Also the question word may appear at the end of the question (so you can either say Comment tu t'appelles ? or Tu t'appelles comment ? ~ but I'd rather be asked the former :o).

2 - with no subject/main verb inversion, and this "est-ce" thing that somehow makes the question grammatical. I think I only use it when I am not satisfied with the other two forms, and in a few idiomatic phrases (such as Qu'est-ce que c'est ?). People who start learning French may prefer this form in informal speech, because you don't need to have the intonation right to make your sentence understood as a question (I mean in questions with no question word, such as Est-ce que tu as faim ? ~ if you say Tu as faim ? instead, you need to have the right intonation).

3 - with plain old subject/verb inversion, as I think you do in German: Comment t'appelles-tu ?, Qu'as-tu fait aujourd'hui ?, etc. This is the preferred form when writing in a moderately (or more) formal context. I think it is acceptable in almost every context, but people will more naturally use the other two. Also I think it is less unnatural in open questions (Comment vas-tu ?) than in yes/no questions.

(As a side note, the form one should use has little to do with politeness - you can ask a stranger first form questions, even though you call them "vous". A few days ago I asked someone who had witnessed an accident Vous pourriez me donner votre nom ?).

Also, your question makes me see that all question words are not born equal in that regard.

Re: Qu'est-ce que c'est ?
This strikes me as an idiomatic phrase, something we say all the time. But if you want wild guesses for reasons... First "que" is special because you can't use it as a question word in the first form (you don't say Que c'est ? or C'est que ?, possibly for phonetic reasons). You could use "quoi" instead : C'est quoi ? (Quoi est-ce ? sounds really wrong, and Quoi-t-est-ce ? isn't said either, although I find it funny to say :P I would spell it Kwoitesse ?).
Also C'est quoi ? may sound more demeaning than Qu'est-ce que c'est ?, so we use either depending on context.

Re: Qui est-ce ?
This is quite idiomatic too, but if you want wilder guesses :oops:... Qui est-ce que c'est ? is grammatical, but very long, as you have noticed. So we would be tempted to say it pretty fast (as we often do with est-ce questions). But then Qui est-ce might sound pretty much like Qu'est-ce, which would make the question ambiguous.
Unlike "que", "qui" can be used in the first form: Qui c'est ? or C'est qui ?.

Re: Why is it Comment tu t'appelles ? and not Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles ?
I think Comment tu t'appelles ? is natural, and I would feel no need to use a longer form in most contexts. Saying Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles ? is possible but very unlikely.

Maralais wrote:langage familiale


Langage familier :wink:.

Cathode Ray Sunshine wrote:Guys, I need something explained to me. When to use Qui and when to use Que. The way a friend told me, is that Qui is used when the action falls on the same subject, as opposed to Que which is for indirect subject? I need it explained with details please.


It would help if you were more specific. I suspect your friend meant Que was for direct objects, and that would be in relative clauses.

Let us take an example : The spy who loved me. Who is the subject of its relative clause, and the French is L'espion qui m'aimait.

Que would be used as a direct object: The spy whom I loved -> L'espion que j'aimais.

Qui can also be an indirect object: The spy to whom I gave candies -> L'espion à qui j'ai donné des bonbons.

Cathode Ray Sunshine wrote:Regarding my de vs du question from a while back. Why is it that countries like Chad and Burundi are République du Burundi and République du Tchad respectively and not de Burundi and de Tchad? and why is Côte-d'Ivoire called République de Côte-d'Ivoire and not du Côte-d'Ivoire? I remember someone a while back saying that for instance, if you said de Quebec, it means Quebec city, while du Quebec means Quebec province, so du is use for a wider geographical space, so I wonder why it's not the same for all.

I was reading an article yesterday in French and I noticed that when they mention countries, they always include the article, as opposed to just mentioning the country's name, which gives me a bit more insight as to other mistakes I was making.


As I suggested in an earlier post (about en/dans), we use articles when mentionning most countries and provinces. La France, l'Allemagne, le Tchad, le Burundi, le Québec, la Côte d'Ivoire, la Chine (mais Madagascar et Hawaï). We don't about cities. So Je vais au Québec (la province), Je vais à Québec (la ville). Most European French speakers aren't conscious of this, and many don't know there is a city named Québec.

So, the country of Tchad being called le Tchad, it's only natural to say République du Tchad. I don't know why we say République de Côte-d'Ivoire instead of République de la Côte-d'Ivoire, but it seems to be all about the article used when referring to the country.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Monika » Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:45 pm UTC

Thanks a lot, Grop :)
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
User avatar
Monika
 
Posts: 3323
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Monika » Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:56 pm UTC

Is this right: "I hate doing my homework" = "Je déteste faire mes devoirs"?
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
User avatar
Monika
 
Posts: 3323
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Thu Feb 16, 2012 3:25 pm UTC

Tout à fait.

Did you ask Google Translate? Because this is their first suggestion.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Monika » Fri Feb 17, 2012 12:18 am UTC

Well, I knew all the words (like détester, devoirs), but I wasn't sure if it's "Je déteste [à|de] faire mes devoirs". I asked Google Translate, but it's often wrong on such details.
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
User avatar
Monika
 
Posts: 3323
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Maralais » Sat Feb 18, 2012 11:31 am UTC

je trouve que google translate marche bien si tu l'utilise avec des langues "relatives", comme le français, l'anglais, l'italien etc...

Mais le latin est une exception.
Maralais
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:56 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sat Feb 18, 2012 2:19 pm UTC

Tu veux dire des langues apparentées. Mais comme a remarqué Monika, il pourrait typiquement se tromper dans ce genre de cas, quand un verbe est transitif direct dans une langue et demande une préposition dans une autre.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby bigglesworth » Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:12 pm UTC

Bonjour! Je cherche à apprendre cette belle langue de nouveau. Bien que je n'ai jamais été très couramment.

Je voudrais savoir: quand est quelque chose de "proche" et quand quelque chose de "prés"
Generation Y. I don't remember the First Gulf War, but do remember floppy disks.
User avatar
bigglesworth
I feel like Biggles should have a title
 
Posts: 7193
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:29 pm UTC
Location: The British Empire

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:26 pm UTC

Salut ! Ta question ne me semble pas facile du tout. (Ceci dit ton mot est "près" et non pas "près" ~ ces mots sont différents même s'ils sont homophones, du moins dans mon dialecte). Près et proche veulent dire la même chose.

Proche est un adjectif, tandis que près est généralement utilisé comme adverbe. Quelqu'un de plus bavard que moi a tenté de fournir une explication, mais en la lisant je ne me sens pas plus malin qu'avant.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby bigglesworth » Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:10 pm UTC

Merci beaucoup. Mon problème avec 'é' c'est à cause de mon clavier. :oops:
Generation Y. I don't remember the First Gulf War, but do remember floppy disks.
User avatar
bigglesworth
I feel like Biggles should have a title
 
Posts: 7193
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:29 pm UTC
Location: The British Empire

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:32 pm UTC

Pas de sushi souci, mais je dirais que mieux vaut ne pas mettre d'accent du tout, plutôt que le mauvais.

En tout cas je rappelle ce lien vers une page qui explique comment produire les caractères spéciaux nécessaires quand on veut écrire du français, et qu'on a un clavier nicaraguatémaltèque. Mais je ne dis pas ça pour faire chier, d'autant que j'ai un clavier français qui rend bien sûr tout ça plus facile.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby bigglesworth » Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:36 pm UTC

Ah, bon. Ceci n'est pas quelque chose de mon ecole m'a appris.
Generation Y. I don't remember the First Gulf War, but do remember floppy disks.
User avatar
bigglesworth
I feel like Biggles should have a title
 
Posts: 7193
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:29 pm UTC
Location: The British Empire

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby xh'eishx'wyaxyatee » Mon Mar 05, 2012 7:20 am UTC

Bonjour! Je m'interesse par les differences entre les dialectes français (specifiquement entre le français métropolitain et le français quebecois). Est-ce qu'il y a ici quelqu'un qui sait des exemples des mots, des phrases et des expressions qui sont differents entres les deux variétés? Si vous pouviez m'aider, je serais très reconaissant!
xh'eishx'wyaxyatee
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 6:35 am UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Mon Mar 05, 2012 12:50 pm UTC

Salut, il y a en effet un certain nombre de différences ; les Québequois appellent par exemple les automobiles des chars (alors qu'un Français dirait plutôt une voiture) et se saluent en disant allo, là où un Français dirait bonjour ou salut.

Wikipedia fournit pas mal d'infos à ce sujet.

Et tant que j'y suis, voici une chanson.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby DaFranker » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:25 pm UTC

Grop wrote:[...]
(As a side note, the form one should use has little to do with politeness - you can ask a stranger first form questions, even though you call them "vous". A few days ago I asked someone who had witnessed an accident Vous pourriez me donner votre nom ?).

[snip]

Re: Why is it Comment tu t'appelles ? and not Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles ?
I think Comment tu t'appelles ? is natural, and I would feel no need to use a longer form in most contexts. Saying Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles ? is possible but very unlikely.

[snip]

So, the country of Tchad being called le Tchad, it's only natural to say République du Tchad. I don't know why we say République de Côte-d'Ivoire instead of République de la Côte-d'Ivoire, but it seems to be all about the article used when referring to the country.

To bring some more clarifications from native-Canadian-French-speaker having done some English/French (and vice-versa) translation:

For the first part, while Vous pourriez me donner votre nom? is acceptable (especially if spoken by someone who clearly has a foreign accent), it sounds much more brusque and insistent (almost bordering on the impatient, such as in the phrase "Vous pourriez pas vous bouger le cul un peu?!") than the formal counterpart Pourriez-vous me donner votre nom?. This latter formal form is what is most commonly used in everyday language with strangers, customers, clients, etc. (at least here in Québec - but according to my French colleagues who recently moved over for business reasons it's also pretty much like that in France)

For the second part, Comment est-ce que tu t'appelles? is far from unlikely in spoken Québécois, and in strictly-informal contexts it comes in close second behind C'quoi ton nom?. Although it's usually pronounced more like "Commen's'tu t'appelles?" than the pretty and long-winded sentence it should be.

As for the third bit, I believe the reason we say République de Côte-d'Ivoire instead of République de la Côte-d'Ivoire is because here the "la" would also be inferred to put emphasis on identity and quantity of "Côte-d'Ivoire"s as items (i.e. it would make "Côte-d'Ivoire" sound like an improper noun), where this phrase would refer to [a/the] Republic within the item or "of the" item. I would certainly translate it to one of those two if it ever actually occurred in a French text that I had to translate into English, assuming I could confirm that it wasn't simply a mistake on the part of the author.
DaFranker
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 11:25 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Maralais » Sat Apr 21, 2012 8:34 pm UTC

Grop wrote:Tu veux dire des langues apparentées. Mais comme a remarqué Monika, il pourrait typiquement se tromper dans ce genre de cas, quand un verbe est transitif direct dans une langue et demande une préposition dans une autre.

Mais les langages n'aident pas du tout là, comme c'est décider de faire quelque chose, mais se décider à faire quelque chose!

J'ai passé un examen de français dont le sujet était les propositions il n'y a pas longtemps.
Maralais
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:56 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Apr 22, 2012 6:36 pm UTC

Tout à fait, et c'est autant de pièges pour un robot ! Mais j'avoue que google translate s'améliore.

(DaFranker, je ne suis pas forcément d'accord avec tout ce que tu dis, mais je n'ai pas d'argument donc je ne discute pas :wink:).

Sinon aujourd'hui c'était le premier tour des élections présidentielles en France. Je suis assez déçu par le résultat, même s'il était plutôt prévisible.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby kizolk » Sat Apr 28, 2012 11:22 pm UTC

DaFranker wrote:As for the third bit, I believe the reason we say République de Côte-d'Ivoire instead of République de la Côte-d'Ivoire is because here the "la" would also be inferred to put emphasis on identity and quantity of "Côte-d'Ivoire"s as items (i.e. it would make "Côte-d'Ivoire" sound like an improper noun), where this phrase would refer to [a/the] Republic within the item or "of the" item. I would certainly translate it to one of those two if it ever actually occurred in a French text that I had to translate into English, assuming I could confirm that it wasn't simply a mistake on the part of the author.


Not sure about that. I think it's something more general. Take Canada and France for instance: we say "je vais au Canada" but "je vais en France", not "à la France". Of course in some contexts "à la France" is perfectly acceptable, but not in this one, i.e. when you indicate a location (either where you are or where you go. Though I find it funny that we say "nos pensées vont à la France". If you replace "à la" with "en", it just sounds so awkward! :D But I'm digressing). I don't know, it just seems to me that there's something funny going on with preposition + feminine in some contexts, that causes the article to be dropped.

Anyway, your explanation doesn't account for "République du Tchad": "le" is still here. Sure it may not be audible/visible, but I'm pretty sure you and all French native speakers do have "le" in mind when they say "du". What I mean is, I don't think we'd use "du" where "le" would sound weird. So on this aspect, I don't see any difference between République du Tchad/de Côte d'Ivoire. And if you think it has to do with the fact that "côte" is a common noun, then we should say "République de la Chine" for instance, but we don't.

Anyway, maybe I'm just stupid, but right now I can't determine what the exact value of "de" in "République de Côte d'Ivoire" is. Is it possession? I don't think so, because you would say "la politique de la Côte d'Ivoire". Is it origin? Sure, you would say "du café de Côte d'Ivoire", but I don't think that applies to "République de Côte d'Ivoire". I don't know, it confuses me. But I think knowing the exact value of this "de" would be a good starting point because, as the examples I just gave as well show, the presence of the article can be governed by the exact meaning of the preposition/syntactic relation between the noun phrases. Alternatively, maybe there's no pattern, no systematic rule: maybe we should just accept the fact that the article is dropped in the "République de..." construction when the country is feminine.

(en fait, je viens juste de finir d'écrire ce message et je me dis que j'aurais dû l'écrire entièrement en français. Dans d'autres forums anglophones non-consacrés au français, je tiens toujours à parler anglais même avec des compatriotes par respect pour les non-francophones, mais... le principe de ce thread c'est de parler français, non ? =O )

Bah tant que j'y suis :

Grop wrote:Sinon aujourd'hui c'était le premier tour des élections présidentielles en France. Je suis assez déçu par le résultat, même s'il était plutôt prévisible.


J'ai été très déçu aussi, mais peut-être pas pour les mêmes raisons. Je vais pas en faire un secret, mon candidat c'était Mélanchon. Comme beaucoup, j'ai cru que la troisième place était pour lui, ou alors qu'il la raterait de peu ; deux foins moins de vote que Le Pen au final, ça fait beaucoup. Bien sûr on sait que les gens hésitent à avouer aux sondeurs qu'ils voteront Le Pen (ce qui est stupide, je trouve. J'ai beau être un "mélanchoniste", je vois pas pourquoi le vote frontiste devrait être marqué du sceau de la honte), mais je croyais quand même qu'avec cette fameuse dédiabolisation opérée par Marine, les sondages seraient assez proches de la réalité. Et bah non. De toutes façons je suis contre les sondages.

En tout cas, j'attends le débat avec impatience !
kizolk
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:09 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Apr 29, 2012 1:15 am UTC

J'ai aussi voté pour Mélanchon, pour tout te dire.

Tu ne t'es pas présenté ... Tu es donc français ? Où vis-tu donc ?
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby kizolk » Sun Apr 29, 2012 9:25 pm UTC

Soyons optimistes: 2017, c'est pour nous ! ;)

Dans l'Yonne ! J'habite un petit village peuplé d'une centaine d'âmes. Pas de commerce, pas de transport à part le bus scolaire ; rien à part une mairie, une église et -- tadam ! -- une cabine téléphonique. Ah, et une fontaine publique. Et puis il y a une sorte de bar qui ouvre une fois par an pendant la brocante -- la période de l'année où l'activité bat son plein, tout le monde se lâche un verre de pinard à la main, tout en jetant un coup d'oeil à la herse du voisin. L'acier a l'air d'assez bonne qualité ; un petit coup de peinture et elle sera comme neuve. Je crois que je vais me laisser tenter...

Bon OK, j'éxagère un peu ! Mais pas beaucoup... ;) T'es d'où ?
kizolk
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 1:09 pm UTC

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Tue May 01, 2012 7:53 am UTC

Un Burgonde ! :o

J'habite dans les Alpes-Maritimes (où j'ai grandi, même si je suis né en Île-de-France). Mon village est petit et il n'y a pas grand' chose à y faire, mais autour il y a plusieurs villes importantes, c'est entre Cannes, Antibes et Grasse ~ et Nice n'est pas trop loin non plus.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby bigglesworth » Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:15 pm UTC

Mon amie: comment expliquer les Thunderbirds aux francais?!
Moi: Ils sont nommes en hommage a l'oiseau d'Amerique du Sud mythologique

Is this the right way to say "named after"?

*Edit: aside from the fact that the Thunderbird was in fact a North American mythological animal, I know north and south in French :mrgreen:
Generation Y. I don't remember the First Gulf War, but do remember floppy disks.
User avatar
bigglesworth
I feel like Biggles should have a title
 
Posts: 7193
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:29 pm UTC
Location: The British Empire

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Thu Jun 28, 2012 9:54 pm UTC

Hi! I think this probably works ~ althougth I don't know which Thunderbirds this is about. Wikipedia suggests quite a few possibilities.

en hommage à [quelque chose] suggests there is quite some respect to the thing in question. I don't know if something can be said to be named after some random bird's shit, but then "en hommage à " wouldn't fit.

You could also say:

Ils portent le nom d'un oiseau mythique d'Amérique du Sud ~ ou peut-être du Nord :wink: .
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Monika » Mon Jul 02, 2012 9:35 am UTC

"arrêter la musique"
Would you understand that the music (tape/CD/sound file) was paused or that it was turned off completely?
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
User avatar
Monika
 
Posts: 3323
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby bigglesworth » Mon Jul 02, 2012 9:50 am UTC

Grop wrote:You could also say:

Ils portent le nom d'un oiseau mythique d'Amérique du Sud ~ ou peut-être du Nord :wink: .
The 'Thunderbirds' in question is a 1960s British TV series.

Good suggestion though. It's especially good for a Brit since it's the same phrasing as "It bears the name of" :mrgreen:
Generation Y. I don't remember the First Gulf War, but do remember floppy disks.
User avatar
bigglesworth
I feel like Biggles should have a title
 
Posts: 7193
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2007 9:29 pm UTC
Location: The British Empire

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Mon Jul 02, 2012 10:42 am UTC

Monika wrote:"arrêter la musique"
Would you understand that the music (tape/CD/sound file) was paused or that it was turned off completely?


I think it could mean either, although turning it off would be more likely. It may depend on context.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Iv » Wed Jul 18, 2012 5:39 pm UTC

"Pause" would be "mettre en pause".
Iv
 
Posts: 1201
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2007 1:08 pm UTC
Location: Lyon, France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Monika » Sun Jul 22, 2012 12:21 am UTC

Ah, thanks.
#xkcd-q on irc.foonetic.net - the LGBTIQQA support channel
User avatar
Monika
 
Posts: 3323
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 8:03 am UTC
Location: Germany, near Heidelberg

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Cathode Ray Sunshine » Sun Sep 02, 2012 3:17 am UTC

Bonjour! Je m'appelle Rafael et j'apprends le français à l'a alliance française. J'ai 23 ans. J'adore les langues étrangeres, le football et la musique. Je n'aime pas beaucoup la pluie.


Well, I'm only on level 1, but so far I'm really liking the class. I only know the basics, how to introduce myself, the possessive pronouns and talk about what I like and don't like, but hey you gotta start somewhere right? Though the course is almost coming to and end and we have to talk about a French person or city, so I might need some help with that. But yeah, basically to let you guys know I might be dropping by here a lot.


I know it's probably me and not having my ears yet accustomed to the language, but I think soixante-deux ans and soixante-douze ans sound very alike. I know douze has a harsher sound, but I don't know if I'm deliberately pronouncing it that way to distinguish it or if it does indeed sound like like that.
User avatar
Cathode Ray Sunshine
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:05 am UTC
Location: Dominican Republic

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Sep 02, 2012 8:01 am UTC

Salut Rafael !

Ça alors, tu n'aimes pas la pluie :wink:. Ceci dit par ici elle est plutôt la bienvenue en cette fin d'été.

I think 72 would be septante-deux in either Swiss or Belgian French, so these dialects would be easier for you :P.

More seriously, deux and douze sound quite different to me; I suppose the vowel in deux is difficult to you. Did you notice the x in deux is silent?
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Cathode Ray Sunshine » Sun Sep 02, 2012 2:17 pm UTC

Deux and douze do sound different, but I meant when said with the word ans. Because there's the liaison, so to me, soixante-deux ans ends up sounding somewhat similiar to soixante-douze ans. Unless there's no liaison with the x and the vowel of the following word.
User avatar
Cathode Ray Sunshine
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:05 am UTC
Location: Dominican Republic

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Sun Sep 02, 2012 11:04 pm UTC

Indeed with the liaison, I can see how this can be problematic, because only the vowel tells you the difference.

...

Aujourd'hui sort la v6 de kraland interactif, un jeu de rôle en ligne dont le thème principal est la parodie de politique.

Je suis fou.

Pour l'anectode, je joue un gars un peu simplet, adorateur de la Grande Déesse et plutôt filou.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Cathode Ray Sunshine » Thu Sep 13, 2012 4:22 pm UTC

What's the difference between par and pour?

I thought pour was similar to the spanish "para" (for), as in "pour moi?" meaning "for me?" and par was like "por" (for). But I've been seeing instances where par would make sense but pour is used. Like for instance "désolé pour hier soir". I know you shouldn't really compare languages because it might confuse you and make you develop bad habits, but I'm comparing them to spanish since they're both romance languages so I thought they might be similar in that regard. I know that par might also be used as the english "by" but I think "for" is more apt, no?
User avatar
Cathode Ray Sunshine
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:05 am UTC
Location: Dominican Republic

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Fri Sep 14, 2012 12:21 pm UTC

Par and pour are quite different prepositions. It's hard to tell which prepositions they translate to, because it really depends on context.

Also I don't speak Spanish.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Thu Dec 27, 2012 12:26 am UTC

Dites les gens, vous avez vu Intouchables ? Le film dont personne n'a trop compris le titre, mais bon, un film sympa quand même.

L'avez-vous vu doublé ou bien sous-titré ? Le langage y est plutôt difficile, je l'ai vu avec mes parents qui avaient activé les sous-titres pour malentendants (sur un dvd emprunté), je pense que sinon ils n'auraient pas compris grand'chose.

...

Sinon j'imagine que ce message pourrait être fusionné avec celui au-dessus, mais je suppose que tout le monde survivra sinon, donc je n'ai pas contacté les modérateurs (ni vu comment supprimer mon message précédent).
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Cathode Ray Sunshine » Fri Dec 28, 2012 1:44 am UTC

Bonjour Grop! Je n'ai pas vu le film Intouchables, mais je ne vais pas beaucoup à le cinéma.

Mon cours de français va bien. Je suis au niveau 3. Il y a beaucoup de choses que je ne sais pas, mais j'apprends quelque chose tous les jours. J'écoute RFI tout le journée et j'ai découvert quelques groupes de rock français qui sont trés bonnes. Je suis trés content d'apprendre une nouvelle langue, mais j'ai besoin d'étudier plus. Je dois apprendre meilleur le passé compossé (je crois que mon professeure nous a dit que en français se dit "apprendre à coeur"?).

Je veux apprendre le français et pouvoir parler avec vous tous.
User avatar
Cathode Ray Sunshine
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:05 am UTC
Location: Dominican Republic

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Grop » Fri Dec 28, 2012 11:28 am UTC

Salut Cathode !

Ton professeur a probablement dit "apprendre par cœur". Apprendre quelque chose par cœur, c'est se le répéter tant de fois qu'on finit par le savoir, sans qu'on ait besoin d'y réfléchir.

Mais on apprend plus typiquement par cœur un texte (comme une poésie) ou une liste (de verbes irréguliers par exemple). Il me semble étrange de vouloir apprendre par cœur le passé composé, dont la conjugaison est simple (après tout il s'agit seulement de savoir conjuguer avoir et être au présent de l'indicatif) mais qui comporte plein de règles compliquées.

...

Et aussi, on va au cinéma.
User avatar
Grop
 
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 10:36 am UTC
Location: France

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Cathode Ray Sunshine » Fri Dec 28, 2012 12:01 pm UTC

Oui, le passé composé n'est pas difficile, mais mon difficulté est pouvoir souvenir quelles verbes sont conjugués avec être. Je connais DR MRS VANDERTRAMP, et il y a aussi un poéme qui s'appelle Le petit déjeuner, pour aider-toi souvenir les verbes.
User avatar
Cathode Ray Sunshine
 
Posts: 366
Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 8:05 am UTC
Location: Dominican Republic

Re: Parlons Français ! [French practice]

Postby Carlington » Sat Dec 29, 2012 10:34 am UTC

Bonjour!
Comment ça va? Moi, ça va bien. Je m'appelle Chris, et j'habite en Australie. Ma copine a m'appris un peu du Français, et j'ai practique avec "Duolingo" aussi. Je comprends beaucoup de Français, dans cette (thread? Je ne sais pas le mot), mais j'ai un petit probléme.
J'ai pensée que ma copine peut m'apprendre le Français, mais en fait, non, parce-qu'elle parle beaucoup d'Argot. C'etait un grand problem, quand on a visitée la France! Je dois parler le Français propre, alors je suis ici.
J'espere que je peut ici practique, et amelier(?) mon Français.
A bientôt!
Kewangji wrote:Posdy zwei tosdy osdy oady. Bork bork bork, hoppity syphilis bork."
One day, I'm going to come home and find you lying on the floor. I'll ask what's wrong and you'll say "It finished...he stopped updating...it's over..."
No-one does a slice like Big Rico's. No-one.
User avatar
Carlington
Folk punch me a lot
 
Posts: 1246
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 8:46 am UTC
Location: Sydney, Australia.

PreviousNext

Return to Language/Linguistics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests