1190: "Time"

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Ebonite
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Ebonite » Wed May 15, 2013 5:53 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby jetpac » Wed May 15, 2013 5:54 pm UTC

Pikrass wrote:<snip>
StratPlayer wrote:
Kieryn wrote:
Spoiler:
Ebonite wrote:
Dracomax wrote:
jjjdavidson wrote:Old Farts and First Computers: My first programming experience was on a Texas Instruments TI-58 calculator my parents bought me as a high school graduation present. Wikipedia says it was "Turing-complete," so I guess that counts.

I had a c64, and we had to program uphill in the snow, both ways just to run a simple program.


I first learned FORTRAN programming in college on my university's IBM 360 mainframe. Back then, we used punch cards to run batch programs, and waited around 5-10 minutes (depending on how busy they were) before we got our results back on a printout. You could recognize a beginner because they carried their card decks in their hands, usually held together with a rubber band; "real" programmers had programs that filled a whole box of cards.

When the department faculty discovered I was really good at programming, I got welcomed into the "inner circle", and was granted access to the "Time-Sharing Facility". That meant I was issued a special account where I could actually use one of the console terminals, write programs in BASIC, and store them on a disk drive somewhere instead of using punch cards!

I've since had access to an incredibly wide variety of computers throughout college and graduate school, so I never really had any pressing need to buy one of my own. The coolest one was a Xerox 1108 Lisp workstation that was assigned to me for my dissertation research; it had windows, menus, and a mouse long before Microsoft and Apple introduced those features to the general public.

I finally caved and bought a "skinny Mac" - the original 128K Apple Macintosh - when it came out, to use partly as a dialup terminal and partly as a word processor. I ended up buying the development kit and learning how to program it as well, although I never really got into it. . .about the only interesting thing I ever wrote for the Mac was a text-based adventure game (in the spirit of "Adventure" or "Zork") for my friends to play, where they had to figure out how to find and rescue a female friend from the rubble of our severely trashed dormitory building and escape before the police arrived. :D

In case you haven't figured it out yet, I'm old enough where, in 1999, the company I work for put me on a special "on call" list for Y2K because I actually know COBOL. :D


FORTRAN? COBAL? Luxury! We used to dream of programming at that level. When I were a lad we had to assembly code using nothing but a football field covered in mastermind boards.
And after we'd finished, if we had but one yellow peg out of place, our dad would beat us with old newspapers and lecture us for several weeks about Ada Lovelace and send us to bed with no supper.


Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!


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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Opiboble » Wed May 15, 2013 5:54 pm UTC

Sciscitor wrote:After some time (I was kinda sick the last days) another diagramm of this thread. Nothing fancy and I believe it has been done before, but now it is updated (up to post 23000 or so):

That is cool, we may be posting less but there is far more to read... well probably not since most of it is probably quoted text, lol.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 5:56 pm UTC

Sciscitor wrote:After some time (I was kinda sick the last days) another diagramm of this thread. Nothing fancy and I believe it has been done before, but now it is updated (up to post 23000 or so):


Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.

Interesting to see there is an upward trend in post length :)
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby htom » Wed May 15, 2013 5:56 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote: fishing poles ...
Spoiler:
Febrion wrote:
k.bookbinder wrote:
ucim wrote:Nice to see some wildlife in the new world. I wonder if they brought fishing poles.
Jose

As we have not seen them carrying such poles, then if they did, in fact, bring fishing poles, their bags, we may assume, are bags of holding?

Or just plain old hammerspace...

U Can't Touch This???
Oh, wait... Damn... Mixed them up again...


There are collapsing fishing poles. My Dad has an eight-section, telescoping aluminum fly rod that extends to 12' from 16". Things that are not made any more, for various reasons.

Valarya wrote:
htom wrote:
Valarya wrote:AND.... in honor of the latest newpix. I present the OTT with a commemorative tree cupcake:
Spoiler:
Image

Oh, my. Are there directions for making the tree?

I can't tell if this is a serious question or some sort of vague vagueness... so I'll just tell you how to make the tree. :P It's pretty simple; you just need parchment paper and melted colored chocolate. Just drizzle the chocolate in whatever shape you want on the parchment paper (on a flat surface) and let it cool/harden. It'll peel off the parchment easily and you can stabby stab it into the cupcake!


That was nearly speechless, serious technique drooling on my part. Now that it's so kindly explained, :facepalm:, :blush:, I know how to do that. Just never thought of using that technique in that fashion. Thank you.

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Kieryn wrote:
Spoiler:
Ebonite wrote:
Dracomax wrote:
jjjdavidson wrote:Old Farts and First Computers: My first programming experience was on a Texas Instruments TI-58 calculator my parents bought me as a high school graduation present. Wikipedia says it was "Turing-complete," so I guess that counts.

I had a c64, and we had to program uphill in the snow, both ways just to run a simple program.


I first learned FORTRAN programming in college on my university's IBM 360 mainframe. Back then, we used punch cards to run batch programs, and waited around 5-10 minutes (depending on how busy they were) before we got our results back on a printout. You could recognize a beginner because they carried their card decks in their hands, usually held together with a rubber band; "real" programmers had programs that filled a whole box of cards.

When the department faculty discovered I was really good at programming, I got welcomed into the "inner circle", and was granted access to the "Time-Sharing Facility". That meant I was issued a special account where I could actually use one of the console terminals, write programs in BASIC, and store them on a disk drive somewhere instead of using punch cards!

I've since had access to an incredibly wide variety of computers throughout college and graduate school, so I never really had any pressing need to buy one of my own. The coolest one was a Xerox 1108 Lisp workstation that was assigned to me for my dissertation research; it had windows, menus, and a mouse long before Microsoft and Apple introduced those features to the general public.

I finally caved and bought a "skinny Mac" - the original 128K Apple Macintosh - when it came out, to use partly as a dialup terminal and partly as a word processor. I ended up buying the development kit and learning how to program it as well, although I never really got into it. . .about the only interesting thing I ever wrote for the Mac was a text-based adventure game (in the spirit of "Adventure" or "Zork") for my friends to play, where they had to figure out how to find and rescue a female friend from the rubble of our severely trashed dormitory building and escape before the police arrived. :D

In case you haven't figured it out yet, I'm old enough where, in 1999, the company I work for put me on a special "on call" list for Y2K because I actually know COBOL. :D

FORTRAN? COBAL? Luxury! We used to dream of programming at that level. When I were a lad we had to assembly code using nothing but a football field covered in mastermind boards.
And after we'd finished, if we had but one yellow peg out of place, our dad would beat us with old newspapers and lecture us for several weeks about Ada Lovelace and send us to bed with no supper.

rant: Having taught and tutored computer programming and CSCI for decades, I have become convinced that one of the necessary steps on the path to being a better- than- descent programmer is early exposure to assembly language programming. A virtual VAX is enough. It seems to be the only way for students to really understand pointers, rather than waving their hands about them. /rant COBOL ... if it didn't pay so many of my bills I'd hate it.

Rules. There was a time when I was young I spent a lot of time on Venice Beach in California. There was a lonely sign, on a post, by the graveled parking lot. "No Rules", it said. Acres of sand, miles of waves, the sun, the stars, the girls ... last time I was there, the parking lot was paved, and that lonely post had been replaced by a fence with a gate and five poles worth of rules. Twenty-three, if I remember correctly. It just wasn't the same. One of the good things about the long posts from the Blitzers is that they point out things that I saw but did not notice along the way. I appreciate their posts, even if I don't reply to much of what they say.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby jetpac » Wed May 15, 2013 5:56 pm UTC

Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Dracomax » Wed May 15, 2013 5:58 pm UTC

jetpac wrote:
Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

Well, if we want to do that...I once wrote a program that printed "hello world" in white ink.the same color as the monitor.
may actually be made up
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Sciscitor » Wed May 15, 2013 6:01 pm UTC

Opiboble wrote:That is cool, we may be posting less but there is far more to read... well probably not since most of it is probably quoted text, lol.

Nope, only original new and fresh content is counted (erm... kinda I guess; in any case no quotes).
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Opiboble » Wed May 15, 2013 6:04 pm UTC

Sciscitor wrote:
Opiboble wrote:That is cool, we may be posting less but there is far more to read... well probably not since most of it is probably quoted text, lol.

Nope, only original new and fresh content is counted (erm... kinda I guess; in any case no quotes).

Awesome!

Spoiler:
wait for it
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Sciscitor » Wed May 15, 2013 6:06 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.
Last edited by Sciscitor on Wed May 15, 2013 6:11 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby StratPlayer » Wed May 15, 2013 6:06 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:
Spoiler:
Sciscitor wrote:After some time (I was kinda sick the last days) another diagramm of this thread. Nothing fancy and I believe it has been done before, but now it is updated (up to post 23000 or so):


Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.


Interesting to see there is an upward trend in post length :)


Fewer and fewer people writing more and more about less and less. If this trend continues, eventually it will be nobody writing everything about nothing.

(Oh and cool graph, Sciscitor!)
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Opiboble » Wed May 15, 2013 6:08 pm UTC

late ong

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby StratPlayer » Wed May 15, 2013 6:09 pm UTC

Sciscitor wrote:<snip>
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character cunt, but information content.
<snip>


Umm, I'm just going to assume that was a typo because I don't even want to open the discussion on how you can define "character" in one of those. But it is an interesting idea...
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby htom » Wed May 15, 2013 6:10 pm UTC

Dracomax wrote:
Spoiler:
jetpac wrote:
Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

Well, if we want to do that...I once wrote a program that printed "hello world" in white ink.the same color as the monitor.
may actually be made up

Quasi-useless programming and abuse of computers. Wondering how many a million things actually was, I printed a million asterisks. 120 per line, 50 lines per page, 167 pages. Laid out on the lawn, 13 pages x 13 pages, with two missing. A million is far beyond many.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:11 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:<snip> nobody writing everything about nothing.

Sounds like statutory law...
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby k.bookbinder » Wed May 15, 2013 6:13 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.


I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:14 pm UTC

Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:16 pm UTC

k.bookbinder wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.

I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:

Yeah, my brain was kind of churning as I wrote it, then as I was re-reading it, it started overheating. After I re-read and edited it for the 3rd time I had to go out and get a frappuccino.

EDIT: Quote fix. It was me, not StratPlayer that said that.
Last edited by Kieryn on Wed May 15, 2013 6:19 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby StratPlayer » Wed May 15, 2013 6:18 pm UTC

k.bookbinder wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.


I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:


OK, I throw out a lot of off-the-cuff posts in the OTT, but I'm pretty sure I would remember writing THAT!. But I don't. So I didn't. Methinks you mean our illustrious Kieryn...

ETA: ...as he pointed out in his Ninja post above...
Last edited by StratPlayer on Wed May 15, 2013 6:19 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Opiboble » Wed May 15, 2013 6:18 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:
Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)


Time to bust out some new words:
supercalafragalisticexpialadoshus
Gormless
Shibboleth
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Dracomax » Wed May 15, 2013 6:20 pm UTC

More words that I don't think I've seen recently on here:
callipygian
escutcheon
Feckless
Antediluvian
Deoxyribonucleic acid
acytlsalicylic acid
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:22 pm UTC

Opiboble wrote:
Kieryn wrote:
Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)


Time to bust out some new words:
supercalafragalisticexpialadoshus
Gormless
Shibboleth


Nice. I just caused an anomalous spike.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby StratPlayer » Wed May 15, 2013 6:23 pm UTC

Opiboble wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:
Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)

Time to bust out some new words:
supercalafragalisticexpialadoshus
Gormless
Shibboleth


Not New
Former Forever member of the OTT, now moved on to other things sucked back in by the wowterful wonder of the thread...

OTT: Sit it vivet in aeternum!!!


(My Blog: The Creative Outlet of StratPlayer )

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Dracomax » Wed May 15, 2013 6:25 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:
Opiboble wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:
Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)

Time to bust out some new words:
supercalafragalisticexpialadoshus
Gormless
Shibboleth



Not New
I'm pretty sure antediluvian had been used as well, but I had $20 and only 5 other $3 words came to mind...
“have i gone mad?
im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are.”
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Opiboble » Wed May 15, 2013 6:28 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:
Opiboble wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:
Sciscitor wrote:
Kieryn wrote:Ooh cool! What is the length based on? Is it the number of characters from the text based on the dataset I gave you? Or are you using another metric.)

Simple character count from my own DB (my tools just work easier with it; I am still working on finding a creative way to use the wealth of data in your file).
But you gave me a (perhaps) interesting idea: Not character count, but information content. The easiest was to measure this would probably be to apply a good compression algorithm to the texts and use the resulting byte count as metric... *mumble mumble mumble*

Edited to remove embarressing typo.


Or you could use word count, or noun count or maybe even the number of totally new words to the thread. Would be interesting to see how fast we are exhausting the english language :)

Time to bust out some new words:
supercalafragalisticexpialadoshus
Gormless
Shibboleth


Not New

Darn it!
Sea1(Big) River2(Small) Tree3(Neat) Camp4(Old) River5(Pretty Neat) Place6(beautiful & empty) Found7(Ribbit) Bigtree8(It knows)
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby taixzo » Wed May 15, 2013 6:29 pm UTC

I like how the link highlighted "pile", "of" and "steaming" but not "shibboleth".
bouer wrote:411 posts in less than a day, and over 650 people reading the thread. Is this breaking any XKCD records?



ETA: Suddenly, a portal to page 730 appears! (this is to let me skip the pages I've already read)
Last edited by taixzo on Tue May 28, 2013 8:27 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:30 pm UTC

htom wrote:
Dracomax wrote:
Spoiler:
jetpac wrote:
Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

Well, if we want to do that...I once wrote a program that printed "hello world" in white ink.the same color as the monitor.
may actually be made up

Quasi-useless programming and abuse of computers. Wondering how many a million things actually was, I printed a million asterisks. 120 per line, 50 lines per page, 167 pages. Laid out on the lawn, 13 pages x 13 pages, with two missing. A million is far beyond many.

Wow, you know I did almost exactly the same thing. Except I was just a kid and hadn't done any programming at that point. So I just painstakingly drew ten-thousand dots on a page and asked my mom to get me 100 photocopies from her work, which she kindly and bemusedly obliged.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:33 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:
htom wrote:
Dracomax wrote:
Spoiler:
jetpac wrote:
Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

Well, if we want to do that...I once wrote a program that printed "hello world" in white ink.the same color as the monitor.
may actually be made up

Quasi-useless programming and abuse of computers. Wondering how many a million things actually was, I printed a million asterisks. 120 per line, 50 lines per page, 167 pages. Laid out on the lawn, 13 pages x 13 pages, with two missing. A million is far beyond many.

Wow, you know I did almost exactly the same thing. Except I was just a kid and hadn't done any programming at that point. So I just painstakingly drew ten-thousand dots on a page and asked my mom to get me 100 photocopies from her work, which she kindly and bemusedly obliged.


Edit: I wonder if any coworkers ever saw what she was doing and asked about it?

Oops. I double posted when I meant to edit. Doh. Now I need to think of something original to say... hmmm. Beluga!
Last edited by Kieryn on Wed May 15, 2013 6:34 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Dracomax » Wed May 15, 2013 6:34 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:
htom wrote:
Dracomax wrote:
Spoiler:
jetpac wrote:
Ebonite wrote:
StratPlayer wrote:Mastermind boards!?!? You were pampered and coddled!! All we had were bare bits we had to carry by hand. Big rusty things the size of cannonballs, they were, and if we so much as whimpered, we were beaten with cobalt rods and sent to live in Siberia, and we were still expected to make the cannonballs compile while we were gone, using carrier pigeons!

Mastermind?? That took too much memory! All we could do was code programs for tic-tac-toe. We could only do a 2x2 grid, and "X" was the only player. . .

You seem to have strayed from difficult programming into useless programming :)

Well, if we want to do that...I once wrote a program that printed "hello world" in white ink.the same color as the monitor.
may actually be made up

Quasi-useless programming and abuse of computers. Wondering how many a million things actually was, I printed a million asterisks. 120 per line, 50 lines per page, 167 pages. Laid out on the lawn, 13 pages x 13 pages, with two missing. A million is far beyond many.

Wow, you know I did almost exactly the same thing. Except I was just a kid and hadn't done any programming at that point. So I just painstakingly drew ten-thousand dots on a page and asked my mom to get me 100 photocopies from her work, which she kindly and bemusedly obliged.

That's just organic programming.
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im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are.”
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby kryton » Wed May 15, 2013 6:35 pm UTC

Accidental Time Tourist Journal
Coordinates: top of page 465 of 625

Trodlydyting onward, hoping to one day rejoin the future. A slack weekend put me even farther behind, *sigh*

A few posts I wanted to comment on...
ericm301 wrote:<snip>

Welcome, glad to see you de-lurk, and you have a good grasp of footnotes.

Valarya wrote:Anyone else notice how cute it is that, once the Blitzrandir Singularity occurred, the OTT sped up so quickly that it put several 'regulars' far in the past post-coma so they had to Blitz the thread of Time to catch up to her? It makes me smile every morningoutside to see the :shock: in people's posts about how many newpages they've missed.

Have another smile on me, :shock: i've actually fallen FARTHER behind??? Pages seem to create out there in the future faster than I can read in the past, Heaaaaaavy!

I passed one of my 'signposts on page 462.

I am really enjoying the music parody lyrics, lots of talent here. I can actyually hear the music as I read them.

I had to take the side road down to kieryn.com's toy for nouns. Neato! he, he. It says that towels are best fresh or wet, photons are many, it confirmed that Helper is dead?!?!? and that TIME encompasses everything.

Also saw the original post from BlitzGirl on the "boom De yada". wow, that's impressive, more than I could do.

sigcouragements
htom wrote:
kryton wrote: Ice?
Ice! Ice! Ice!

Thank you for the ice, the cooler is now well stocked.

PhoenisRising wrote:...*offers strength to anyone else Blitzing*

thank you, I seem to need it as I'm not blitzing that well.

StratPlayer wrote:Vytron and other blitzers: Please post your progress -- you need NOT blitz in silence!!!

Sorry, I was a neglectful mechanoid. this is hopefully a remedy.
1298 and counting

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby slinches » Wed May 15, 2013 6:37 pm UTC

mscha wrote:While y'all are punning away, I just wanted to note that, unfortunately, things have quieted down on the molpy-sparrow-raptor front.
There haven't been any non-Cuegan pixel changes since the bird flew away. :(


That's good. I was afraid the molpy was going to end up being one of these:
Spoiler:
Image
from Screamers


Kieryn wrote:
k.bookbinder wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.

I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:

Yeah, my brain was kind of churning as I wrote it, then as I was re-reading it, it started overheating. After I re-read and edited it for the 3rd time I had to go out and get a frappuccino.

EDIT: Quote fix. It was me, not StratPlayer that said that.

I think that would be greatly simplified if you switched to spherical coordinates centered at the core of the earth and ignore the non-radial components.
Last edited by slinches on Wed May 15, 2013 6:49 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby ucim » Wed May 15, 2013 6:39 pm UTC

Act 1, Scene 4


It is dark; a grotto lit only by candles placed in the nooks of the walls. There are also larger chambers carved out of the walls; they each hold many scrolls of varying sizes. A large table, center stage, is piled with musty books whose ancient bindings show the effects of many yips of use. A large, elaborate candelabra centerpiece illuminates the scribes and clerics who scrutinze these documents by the flickering candlelight.

Among the scribes and clerics bent over the table is the Pope of the Order of the Holy Contradiction. He gets up with a pained look on his face. Something has happened.

the Pope wrote:I fear there has been a disturbance in the force, as if great voices cried out in anguish, and were suddenly silenced.
first scribe wrote:Why, your Pontiffness? What have you read?
the Pope wrote:It's not what I have read, it's what I have not read.
third cleric wrote:Don't tell me the Pope is feeling a Great Chasm!
fourth cleric wrote:Will you be going back in time?
first scribe wrote:A Quest!
second scribe wrote:A Holy Quest!
The First Cleric hears the excitement and enters from stage right

First Cleric wrote:A Quest?? What is it?
first scribe wrote:It's a Glorious and Holy Pilgrimage through Time. But that's not important right now. Our Pope is feeling a Great Chasm.
First Cleric wrote:Between the ears, he is.

the Pope wrote:This is a most grave and serious matter. I preparing for the Service for True Pilgrims of Time, I have been...
The assembled scribes and clerics glare at the Pope

the Pope continued and wrote:Ok, we all have been consulting the Holy Records, divining who shall be so Blessed in the service. I have also been gathering the Gospels together, and... well... the records just... stop. I fear something terrible has happened.
Spoiler:
First Cleric wrote:Something terrible happens every time you act, Mister Pope.
ignoring that outburst, the Pope wrote:Look here at the Gospel of Vytron, for example. Wonderful inspiring documents, then a cry of despair and nothing else. And then look at the writings of...
First Cleric, cutting him off, wrote:No. Don't look at the writings. If they are not there, they are not there. Don't look at what is not there. Instead look at what is there, and that is a Pope who let the sea invade the castle during the first BlitzGirl the Next ceremony, who crowned a BlitzGirl in Paradox, who released raptors while blathering about signs...
first scribe wrote:Silence! The Pope has something to say; we should hear him out. All of us - that is, all of us except you, have been toiling dix after dix in preparation for the Great Service of Pilgrimmage. What have you done?
First Cleric wrote:I have become enlightened.
There is general laughter, but the Pope raises his hand to silence the group.

the Pope wrote:This matter is most serious. It is the largest rift we have experienced to date, and it is a rift made more insideous by its temporal properties.
fourth cleric wrote:So... I humbly asked before, but unlike our esteemed First Cleric, I have not had the Sacrament of Enlightenment.
There is some tittering in the group.

fourth cleric continued and wrote:Will you be leaving us on a Grand and Holy Quest?
the Pope wrote:No. One cannot go back and actually be back, one can only partly go back while one goes forward, speaking to the future of the past in your own present, sending a present to the future from the past, but unable to post the future to the past, once past the post, first past the post, the post toasties, the fruit bats, the...
The Pope sees the looks of puzzlement on the faces of the group.

fourth cleric wrote:I guess it's a ball of timey wimey stuff.
the Pope wrote:Yes. We must be very mindful of our present, as our present is a present to the past, while the past leaves a present for its future.
The Pope looks at the First Cleric.

the Pope continued and wrote:This is enlightenment.
The Pope addresses the group.

the Pope wrote:Please hand me the Gospel of BlitzGirl.
They all bow their heads, and ethereal music is heard as the first scribe reaches into one of the larger chambers in the wall, and pulls out a bound volume, handing it to the Pope with great reverence. The Pope takes the Book, which opens of its own accord to an oft-read and oft-quoted passage.

the Pope wrote:A Reading from the Book of BlitzGirl, Page 454, utterance 18120, id 3341808.
BlitzGirl wrote:I have seen many wonders on my Quest, and this I have learned: Time is not absolute. Though dedicated forum-dwellers may debate names to a Period fresh to their eyes, a weary wanderer may come to the same TimeFrame many longpix later seeing it as but a flash in the long, long thread of Time. While some among us hold fast to the heels of the Now, posting with immediacy and brevity, there are still others at the same moment following 10 newpages back, or 50, or 300. Those of us who experienced the great Fading in real-Time have shared an experience those that follow will never quite match, just as we ourselves cannot comprehend the madness that struck in the early quickpix, or during the Madness itself.

Yet these divisions do not separate us, but make us more powerful. As grains of Sand(semencancercoffeebabies) in a Sandcastle, this needle-pulled thing works best when we are not all of the same shape. Our quirks clasp us together all the more strongly, so that when we Wait for it together - whatever Time we may travel, whatever sect we may splinter, whatever graph or song or hat we share - we are not alone. For though Time may scatter us among the pastposts and the Present, in the end, it is also what brought us to this mad, mad, glorious home in the first place.

This has been a reading of the Gospel of BlitzGirl, a most precious and unique perspective on Time. Other Time travellers will have other perspectives, each one to be revered. It would be a dark day indeed should these gospels never be writ.

We cannot change the past, but we, in the present, must consider all that will pass through it. The heat from the fire of our passions should not scorch the Path, for it will become lifeless. But neither should we judge others and flood the Path to keep it cool, for it will become like unto a river, and drown us all.
The Pope closes the book, knelt, bowes his head, and hands the book back to the first scribe, who reverently puts it back in its designated chamber. The group also kneels and they all bow their heads. There is a moment of silence. The Pope rises.

the Pope wrote:What progress have we made towards the Service?
second scribe wrote:We have compiled the following list of Pilgrims, your Pontiffness. It has been painstaking work, as the records are still fragmented, but I think the list is complete.
The third cleric reads from a scroll:

third cleric wrote:These are the names:

Vytron, macraw83, LankieBlonde, kryton, azule, tman2nd, VoronX, RobIrr, partingLance, TheMinim, Purplepants77, Caswallon, Valarya, lmjb1964, and of course our BlitzGirls, who are also True Pilgrims of Time: BlitzGirl herself, Selcouth, PhoenixRising, and Flado.
the Pope wrote:Three times has VoronX denied engaging in a Blitz. He skips around merrily thither and yon. These are not the ways of a True Pilgrim of Time.
first scribe wrote:Very well, scratch VoronX.
the Pope wrote:With sadness, but also remembering that each of us holds up the Thread of Time, each with their own shape. VoronX is a True Timewaiter.
third cleric wrote:Indeed he is.
second scribe wrote:Caswallon and Valarya appear to be current, but the records show that they have Blitzed without leaving a true gospel.
the Pope wrote:It is not necessary to leave a gospel, though it is certainly a blessing to have done so. After all, Selcouth Blitzed without even an account, showing true dedication.
First Cleric wrote:What of partingLance and Purplepants77 and lmjb1964? All they did was have condiments.
the Pope wrote:It is not for us to judge. Records indicate that their chasm was certainly wide enough to place them in The Past for a while - for seventy pages in some cases - that is an enormous Chasm. Some are still there. They are truly pure of heart. And then there is the curious case of RobIrr.
first scribe wrote:The fossil BlitzGirl!
the Pope wrote:Yes. But he is also a True Pilgrim of Time. He shall be so blessed. Is all in readiness?
first scribe wrote:Yes, your Pontiffness.
the Pope wrote:Then let us begin.
The scrolls, books, and other records are cleared off of the table, leaving just the Candelabra. Lights intensify on the table, which has become an altar, and dim across the rest of the stage. The Pope strides up to the table, lifts the candelabra up on high, and in the most ancient, sacred tongue, intones:

the Pope wrote:In nomine unium verium auctor....
It sounds a little bit like Latin, but the grammar is different and some of the words clearly have other origins.

translated, the Pope wrote:In the name of the One True Author, in observance of the One True Comic, in the service of the One True Thread, and by witness of the One True Congregation, we humbly open our hearts, our souls, and our schedules in devotion.
the congregation wrote:The sea is big. We open ourselves up to it.
the Pope wrote:In devotion, we drink from the One True Thread. In even higher devotion, some of us forsake the present, inviting the river of Time to flow through us and cleanse us until we are sated by the completeness of the past.
the congregation wrote:The river is small. Although we are smaller, we can, and must, drink from the river of Time.
the Pope wrote:We humbly ask that the Blessings of Time fall on our intrepid travellers, True Pilgrims Of Time, Vytron, macraw83, LankieBlonde, kryton, azule, tman2nd, RobIrr, partingLance, TheMinim, Purplepants77, Caswallon, Valarya, lmjb1964, BlitzGirl, Selcouth, PhoenixRising, and Flado, that they be enlightened, uplifted, and granted the Tree of Life.
the congregation wrote:The tree is neat. Let us live up to it.
the Pope wrote:Let us indeed.
[sound cue 7: gong]

the Pope wrote:It is the Holy ONG. Let us disperse in peace, and worship in awe.
the congregation wrote:In the name of the One True Author, in observance of the One True Comic, in the service of the One True Thread.
the Pope wrote:Amen.
blackout.
Jose
<--previous (NP 609) / table of contents (on xkcd wiki) / next(NP 643)-->
Last edited by ucim on Fri May 24, 2013 5:07 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Kieryn » Wed May 15, 2013 6:42 pm UTC

slinches wrote:
mscha wrote:While y'all are punning away, I just wanted to note that, unfortunately, things have quieted down on the molpy-sparrow-raptor front.
There haven't been any non-Cuegan pixel changes since the bird flew away. :(


That's good. I was afraid the molpy was going to end up being one of these:
Spoiler:
Image
from Screamers


Kieryn wrote:
k.bookbinder wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.

I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:

Yeah, my brain was kind of churning as I wrote it, then as I was re-reading it, it started overheating. After I re-read and edited it for the 3rd time I had to go out and get a frappuccino.

EDIT: Quote fix. It was me, not StratPlayer that said that.

I think that would be greatly simplified if you switched to spherical coordinates centered at the core of the earth and ignored the non-radial components.


Except then I would need to use a physical marker on the earth as some kind of longitudinal origin line. That's just ridiculous... who would do such a thing?
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby k.bookbinder » Wed May 15, 2013 6:44 pm UTC

StratPlayer wrote:
k.bookbinder wrote:
Spoiler:
StratPlayer wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.


I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:


OK, I throw out a lot of off-the-cuff posts in the OTT, but I'm pretty sure I would remember writing THAT!. But I don't. So I didn't. Methinks you mean our illustrious Kieryn...

ETA: ...as he pointed out in his Ninja post above...


See! I am certain now that my brain did, indeed, go "ka-blooey" a bit, for I screwed up the quote blocks.
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby jetpac » Wed May 15, 2013 6:45 pm UTC

ucim, I think this might be one of the rare times on the internet where "epic" is actually the appropriate adjective

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby HES » Wed May 15, 2013 6:53 pm UTC

Dracomax wrote:I always figured that for trains, rise/miles of track makes more sense, because there is a limit to how much grade a train can handle, and you can add miles of track to decrease the rate of climb, as opposed to going straight up a rise.

Especially with the (UK) limit for railway gradient being around 1:60, using the "easy to imagine" degrees gives everything in the range of 0-1.6 which isn't useful to anybody

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby slinches » Wed May 15, 2013 6:54 pm UTC

Kieryn wrote:
slinches wrote:
mscha wrote:While y'all are punning away, I just wanted to note that, unfortunately, things have quieted down on the molpy-sparrow-raptor front.
There haven't been any non-Cuegan pixel changes since the bird flew away. :(


That's good. I was afraid the molpy was going to end up being one of these:
Spoiler:
Image
from Screamers


Kieryn wrote:
k.bookbinder wrote:
Spoiler:
Kieryn wrote:I personally measure gradient between points (A,B) using the differential of relative1 gravitational force acceleration vector (unit [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]) over the radial distance from point A to point B (in meters) at the elevation of point A from the earth's center of gravity, so that would be in [Ni,Nj,Nk] [m/s2i,m/s2j,m/s2k]/m = [s-2,s-2,s-2]

1 The force acceleration vector at point P is always measured using x-axis parallel to the great circle through the point P and the earth's gravitational-rotation axis' pointing towards the anticlockwise pole, the y-axis is perpendicular to that from the center of the earth out to space and the z-axis is the perpendicular of those two using the right-hand rule.

Edit: unit fix. Sincere apologies. I need to go back to school :(

Edit 2: unit reduction.

Edit 3: Thinking about my convention. I think I kind of lose some detail in not making the distance between points A and B also a vector. Note to self: Recheck all of my personal earth-based unit standards.

I read this and...well...I think my brain exploded a little. :shock:

Yeah, my brain was kind of churning as I wrote it, then as I was re-reading it, it started overheating. After I re-read and edited it for the 3rd time I had to go out and get a frappuccino.

EDIT: Quote fix. It was me, not StratPlayer that said that.

I think that would be greatly simplified if you switched to spherical coordinates centered at the core of the earth and ignored the non-radial components.


Except then I would need to use a physical marker on the earth as some kind of longitudinal origin line. That's just ridiculous... who would do such a thing?


True that would be insane, but conveniently you wouldn't need to worry about any of that if you're only concerned with gravitational acceleration vectors. They only have a radial component!

ETA: Slopes are pointless anyway. All we really care about is the difference in gravitational potential energy. :mrgreen:
Last edited by slinches on Wed May 15, 2013 7:04 pm UTC, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby mscha » Wed May 15, 2013 6:54 pm UTC

slinches wrote:
mscha wrote:While y'all are punning away, I just wanted to note that, unfortunately, things have quieted down on the molpy-sparrow-raptor front.
There haven't been any non-Cuegan pixel changes since the bird flew away. :(

That's good. I was afraid the molpy was going to end up being one of these:
Spoiler:
Image
from Screamers

And you think it's good that that didn't happen?
You're weird. :wink:
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby Dracomax » Wed May 15, 2013 7:03 pm UTC

mscha wrote:
slinches wrote:
mscha wrote:While y'all are punning away, I just wanted to note that, unfortunately, things have quieted down on the molpy-sparrow-raptor front.
There haven't been any non-Cuegan pixel changes since the bird flew away. :(

That's good. I was afraid the molpy was going to end up being one of these:
Spoiler:
Image
from Screamers

And you think it's good that that didn't happen?
You're weird. :wink:

I suspect the question is whether the molpy is friendly or not. If it isn't friendly, then I must submit that it is, in fact, you who are weird.
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im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are.”
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Re: 1190: "Time"

Postby spamjam » Wed May 15, 2013 7:04 pm UTC

ONGTHEROADAGAIN
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