1500: Upside-Down Map

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Mar 19, 2015 12:33 am UTC

Somewhere around Claremont/Pasadena in California, two separate streets both named "Foothill" eventually connected to each other, and were distinguished by the names "East" and "West". However, each street also has an easterly portion and a westerly portion, i.e. addresses like "300 east" and "300 west" were like six blocks apart as you'd expect. So driving west from east East Foothill addresses would count down to zero before counting up further west along west East Foothill, until they suddenly changed completely and started counting down as the road became east West Foothill, which would continue until they reached zero again and began counting back up along west West Foothill.

IIRC there were also two other streets with the same name intersecting that same road, Mountain it might have been, and possibly get another, different Foothill running parallel to it a few blocks away.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby keithl » Thu Mar 19, 2015 12:48 am UTC

TomTAC wrote:I would ---- HATE ---- to be on Aruba right now ... Aruba has a lot of beaches on the SW side, so to keep the sharks away from the people, they established a "Shark Feed" on the NE side; that is, they dump garbage and chum and stuff there, and the sharks go there when they get hungry.

But ... now the beaches and the shark feed and the sharks are all on the NE side. Not good.
Ah, but the sharks get rotated 180 degrees, too. This is a side effect of a feature added for Muslims, who will be automatically reoriented to continue facing towards Mecca during prayer.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby pault151 » Thu Mar 19, 2015 1:25 am UTC

Polixenes wrote:What if....the map had always been this shape?
What if....everything miraculously moved instantaneously and non-violently into this configuration? (I think World War III would start shortly thereafter).


Really, the most interesting effect to me would be to drive the new length of the Chunnel, assuming it still connects England and France! New record holder for longest underwater crossing, fer shure.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby keithl » Thu Mar 19, 2015 4:50 am UTC

The world will lose most space assets and communication links. Most telescopes, and many tracking dishes, are on equatorial mounts, and the pivots will point the wrong way. It will be difficult to control low inclination satellites from dishes near the poles. Kennedy Space Center is now far to the north. Eastward/prograde launches fly over Orlando, so KSC would be shut down for range safety reasons, besides being impractically far north of low inclination orbits. Ditto for ESA/Kourou and India's Satish Dhawan launch center. Baikonur will be closer to the equator, so the Russians may have the only space program left on the planet. The big comsats, with transponders pointed at fixed locations on the (former) continents, will be mostly useless. Oceanic fiber won't connect.

Coordinating global commerce by low bandwidth shortwave radio will be practically impossible. Expect gigadeaths from starvation and cold, because farms will be at the wrong latitudes for their crops, and tropical bungalows will be useless in the frozen north and south. With the fuel supply disrupted (most of the oil wells are now in icebound regions), far from refineries, passenger travel will be curtailed. Small jets will move hard drives full of data around until we can manufacture and lay more transoceanic fiber, and larger jets will move seeds between north and south.

Some of humanity will survive, but stress will cause wars. US missile subs stationed on the coast-formerly-known-as-west will have a hard time reaching battle stations, since the direct route to the formerly-northern Eurasian coast is now a narrow strait between the Cape of Good Hope and Siberia. The Chinese will fight Russia to capture Siberian rice paddies.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby petermesmer » Thu Mar 19, 2015 4:56 am UTC

I'd be very interested in seeing a version of this map where the landmasses each received a mercator distortion for their new location.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby duefiori » Thu Mar 19, 2015 5:41 am UTC

As an Italian, I have this ominous feeling that Sardinia and Sicily (which should show on the map, they are big enough) were ruinously crushed below southeast (northwest?) Asia. Of course, the same goes for Corsica, Malta, Cyprus and Crete.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Mar 19, 2015 5:51 am UTC

Everyone's assuming that this map is the result of some terrible unfathomable power rearranging the continents we have now into the continents as we see on the map.

I think a much more interesting speculation would be what the shape of present human civilization would be like if the continents had always been this way. (Also, but far more difficult to reconstruct, what kind of bizarre geological history could produce such a map, and what influence would that have had on the evolution of life and the general prehistory of the world. Needless to say, it would be different enough that human civilization as we know it would not exist).

I can get us started on the human history part at least, assuming against all odds that life as we know it actually evolved somehow in the bizarre alternate prehistory that would lead to such a world. With humanity arising in west (formerly east) Africa, central and east (formerly west) Africa would have become the hub of civilization; a barren alternate-Sahara desert would bar most travel through north (formerly south) Africa, while the Ivory Coast would receive warm wet winds from the equatorial Indian Ocean, and the coast of the former Red Sea would receive cool and relatively dry Antarctic winds, while the northern (formerly southern) edge of the Horn of Africa would receive more moderate weather as the Mid Atlantic ocean currents turned back on themselves without fully reaching the Antarctic first due to the narrow passage between Africa and South America, giving west (formerly east) Africa a generally temperate climate.

Egypt would not be a cradle of civilization as the lower Nile Valley would be frozen tundra along with the rest of south (formerly north) Africa, but likely the upper Nile and its tributaries might be even wetter (with their headwaters at rainforest latitudes), and closer to the birthplace of mankind than the lower Nile of our world, leading to earlier and more flourishing civilization perhaps; or, with less environmental hardship to spur innovation, maybe a delayed onset of civilization. However, with no walkable land crossings to the rest of the world, humanity would be confined to Africa until the development of sea travel, and population pressures might have both encouraged and facilitated the development of civilization, and eventually sea travel allowing the colonization of the rest of the world by already-civilized people, rather than the stone-age people who walked out of Africa to later found their own civilizations in our timeline.

Of further note, earlier hominids could not have spread throughout Eurasia as they did in our timeline for the same reason, meaning, for one thing, there are no Neanderthals in Europe in this timeline for "Cro-Magnon" humans to encounter, never mind that they're on the wrong side of the world now for an early encounter. But more pressingly to our proper human history, there would be no races to speak of as we know them, because colonization of the world would be done quickly by technologically advanced seafaring people, leaving not enough time for the genetic divergence that the slow colonization of the world by foot allowed. Basically everyone would be what we think of as "black" (though as there is more genetic diversity within indigenous Africans than within the rest of the people in the world, likely they would have their own notion of race still, but one more subtle than the "red and yellow, black and white" model many people think of in our world).

How exactly civilized seafaring humans would have left Africa is a bit of a question: the narrowest passage is between northern (formerly southern) Africa and Siberia, but as that end of Africa would be harsh desert, it's unlikely there would be a lot of people there in the first place exploring that passage. Madagascar would probably have been settled early on, but that's not really leaving Africa for the rest of the world in practical terms. With the bulk of civilization in the southern latitudes, and the much narrower Atlantic passage in that world, I would expect that to be the most likely first vector for colonization of the rest of the world, though there could be navigational difficulties with the cyclone-generating weather patterns I would expect of such a narrow passage in a north-south ocean, with circulating winds and currents from the wider seas north and south of it colliding head-on right there.

Given that the passage between the Americas is across a similar desert on a barely-explored continent, I would expect a crossing from Africa to Siberia well before a crossing from Argentina/Chile to Alaska, but then I'd expect that Alaska crossing to still occur before Euroceania (if I may) is thoroughly explored; though I expect interesting things to happen once they get do there.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Antior » Thu Mar 19, 2015 11:16 am UTC

petermesmer wrote:I'd be very interested in seeing a version of this map where the landmasses each received a mercator distortion for their new location.


Check the one I posted on the 2nd page of this thread.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Alexius » Thu Mar 19, 2015 12:24 pm UTC

As another example of north-south naming not really being logical, the Northern Line of the London Underground serves the southernmost station on the network (Morden) but not its northernmost station (Chesham, which is on the Metropolitan Line).

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby ThirdParty » Thu Mar 19, 2015 12:32 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:I assumed that the tensions between the UK and "North" Korea in that world were meant to be analogous to the tensions between the UK and France (across the channel) in the real world, and not so much like the tensions between the UK and North Korea in the real world.
Personally, I assumed that they were meant to be analogous to the tensions between North Korea and Japan.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby DougDean » Thu Mar 19, 2015 1:45 pm UTC

Mokurai wrote:Why is the Siberian Ocean mislabeled the Indian Ocean? Also, why is the Pacific Ocean, west of West Asia and West Africa, and east of the east coasts of the Americas, labeled the Atlantic, and vice versa?
Rat race got you down? Need a break from the frigid New Delhi winter? Come to the Palm trees and sandy beaches lapped by the beautiful tropical Asian Ocean! Come to beautiful, sunny Siberia! Playground of the 1%! Make it your vacation spot for one tranquil week!

Oddly enough, the climate in Nepal doesn't really change all that much.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby mathmannix » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:13 pm UTC

Heh, the North shall rise again.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Andries » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:21 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:Everyone's assuming that this map is the result of some terrible unfathomable power rearranging the continents we have now into the continents as we see on the map.



Randall is indicating that national boundaries are essentially unchanged, though. Although Lesotho has gone, and most European countries have been swallowed up by, I think, Belgium?

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:41 pm UTC

Image
10 Internets if you get the joke in this one.

speising wrote:i like this clear image helpful:
Image

especially the hilarious difference between "British Islands" and "British Isles".
It's with Africa. Panama is also kept wholly with north America and Turkey is also still in one piece.
mathmannix wrote:Wait, what? Has there been any tension between the UK and France in the past, oh say, 200 years?
It depends on what order of magnitude you're looking for; nothing on the scale of north and south Korea; more on the scale of US-France during that "freedom fries" idiocy.
Closer to home, I have to wonder - would Virginia and West Virginia just swap names, or would West Virginia become East Virginia?

(Note that I'm not American so I don't know if there's some historical reason for the names.)
I think in general, with <default> place and "direction" place, default place will keep it's name and direction place will change it's direction. Or we could switch all the norths, souths, eats and wests to fore, aft, starboard and port and then our place names will be rotationally invariant.
We're not very good at naming things.
Nonsense! Just look at all the great names of America cities: York, Pennsylvania; New York, New York; York, New York; Venice, New York; Rome, New York; Paris, Texas; Paris, Wisconsin; Paris, Wisconsin again; 24 other Parii; the eight Londons; the 21 Moscows (Moscattle?); 10 Palestrina; and two Hells.
Pfhorrest wrote:Somewhere around Claremont/Pasadena in California, two separate streets both named "Foothill"
My city ha s a "Baymeadows road", an "Old Baymeadows road" and a "Baymeadows way". The first intersects with both of the others; so there's a stretch of road between Byameadows and Baymeadows and Baymeadows and Baymeadows.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Klear » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:47 pm UTC

Envelope Generator wrote:
Klear wrote: I find a normal map rotated as a whole a much more powerful perspective-changing experience.


From a vantage point in the year 2015 I would find that one quite exhausted of power to change anyone's perspective. It took me about ten seconds to realise that's not what I was looking at when I saw this strip...


What I meant was that when I look at a map that's simply turned upside down (which I don't remember seeing prior to this comic), it really does show me that the world is quite different, most notably how Europe looks small and insignificant compared to basically everything else when the north-centre bias is eliminated. It really is an interesting thing to see.

When I saw this, I had the same feeling for the few second until I realized it's not our world but some other shape, at which point it was instantly gone. Then I read the text about it being perspective changing. Sounded quite lame to me at that point.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby mathmannix » Thu Mar 19, 2015 2:54 pm UTC

Andries wrote:
Pfhorrest wrote:Everyone's assuming that this map is the result of some terrible unfathomable power rearranging the continents we have now into the continents as we see on the map.

Randall is indicating that national boundaries are essentially unchanged, though. Although Lesotho has gone, and most European countries have been swallowed up by, I think, Belgium?

Well, even though it's probably just lack of detail on the map, it does appear that Spain, France, Andorra (obviously), and the low countries are one country now. If history (well, xkcd history) has taught us anything, it's probably all the Netherlands. Some of the countries in Europe are too small to make out, naturally, but it looks to me like Albania and Montenegro are joined.

Africa (and South America) seem to be meticulously detailed for the most part, but there are a few countries missing in Africa:
1. Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, and Gabon are now one nation.
2. South Africa has taken over Lesotho and Swaziland.
3. Eritrea is gone, apparently split between Sudan and Ethiopia.
There are also a couple of territorial changes in Africa:
1. Big Congo (I want to call it Zaire) seems to have expanded a little bit, gobbling up Angola's Cabinda Province and Little Congo's Kouilou Deparment, cutting the latter country entirely off from the ocean.
2. Botswana seems to have taken over the Caprivi Strip, thus settling for certain whether or not there is a quadrapoint in Africa.
TomTAC wrote:Sinai is missing. (The tiny chunk shown as part of Egypt seems to only be the part west of the Suez Canal.)

I disagree... to me it looks like all of Sinai (which is all east of the Suez canal) is attached to Egypt, though there is a line between them that might just be the Gulf of Suez and Suez canal, or might be a border.

In Asia, Bahrain might be too small to make out at resolution, but it appears that Qatar and Kuwait have been by absorbed (by Saudi Arabia, or possibly Iraq for the latter.) Only one of the Transcaucuses is shown, Georgia - I don't even see a boundary between Iran and Russia, so it may be that Russia has taken over Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran. And although none of Asia currently south of about 16 degrees North is shown (denying us a look at mainland Malaysia and Cambodia), quite disturbingly, it looks to me like Thailand is now covered in water.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Coyoty » Thu Mar 19, 2015 3:38 pm UTC

I'm happy with Connecticut's new climate. Southern California's weather and no earthquakes greater than 3 magnitude.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby orthogon » Thu Mar 19, 2015 4:24 pm UTC

mathmannix wrote:
Pfhorrest wrote:I assumed that the tensions between the UK and "North" Korea in that world were meant to be analogous to the tensions between the UK and France (across the channel) in the real world, and not so much like the tensions between the UK and North Korea in the real world.

Wait, what? Has there been any tension between the UK and France in the past, oh say, 200 years?

Oh yes. And there will be again on Saturday at 1700 UTC...

Quizatzhaderac wrote:
Pfhorrest wrote:Somewhere around Claremont/Pasadena in California, two separate streets both named "Foothill"
My city has a "Baymeadows road", an "Old Baymeadows road" and a "Baymeadows way". The first intersects with both of the others; so there's a stretch of road between Byameadows and Baymeadows and Baymeadows and Baymeadows.


I was just about to comment on how people from/in the US tend to omit the "surname" of a street (i.e. "street", "lane", "crescent" etc), both in speech and even on road signs. This can cause confusion for visitors from Europe. Conversely, a Philadelphian friend of mine, giving directions to a hotel in London (England), once said "Turn left on Euston", although there's a Euston Rd, Euston St and Euston Square within a few hundred metres (approximately a few hundred yards) of one another. (Incidentally for any Real Ale lovers, I recommend the Bree Louise on Euston Street). I was going to say that this habit either arose from or gave rise to the practice of not giving nearby streets the same "first name", but apparently it isn't a practice after all.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby mikrit » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:05 pm UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:
We're not very good at naming things.
Nonsense! Just look at all the great names of America cities: York, Pennsylvania; New York, New York; York, New York; Venice, New York; Rome, New York; Paris, Texas; Paris, Wisconsin; Paris, Wisconsin again; 24 other Parii; the eight Londons; the 21 Moscows (Moscattle?); 10 Palestrina; and two Hells.

I think there is an alternative version of me who lives in Gothenburg, Nebraska.

Also, I approve the plural form "Parii".
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:32 pm UTC

keithl wrote:With the fuel supply disrupted (most of the oil wells are now in icebound regions), far from refineries, passenger travel will be curtailed.
How much oil is refined in regions of other continents that the rotation moves significantly farther away from the wells?
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby svenman » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:39 pm UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:Image
10 Internets if you get the joke in this one.

The names of Russia and Belarus have been swapped. Is that supposed to be funny?
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:46 pm UTC

Yes, if you understand why they're swapped.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Mar 19, 2015 6:56 pm UTC

svenman wrote:
Quizatzhaderac wrote:Image
10 Internets if you get the joke in this one.

The names of Russia and Belarus have been swapped. Is that supposed to be funny?
It is if you know what "Belarus" means.

Pfhorrest wrote:However, with no walkable land crossings to the rest of the world, humanity would be confined to Africa until the development of sea travel
Kind of like how no one ever got to the Americas except by boat?

But more pressingly to our proper human history, there would be no races to speak of as we know them, because colonization of the world would be done quickly by technologically advanced seafaring people, leaving not enough time for the genetic divergence that the slow colonization of the world by foot allowed.
No races "as we know them", I'll grant you perhaps, but mostly because "races as we know them" are a historically contingent European invention only a few centuries old.

But there is a remarkably narrow gap between inverted!Africa inverted!Eurasia to claim that no one would cross it until advanced seafaring was developed. I would expect people to live in inverted!Eurasia for at least as long as they've been in our Australia, which is definitely long enough to spread out and diversify a fair amount. It really wouldn't take all that long for vitamin D deficiency to select for hypomelanated individuals in the northern parts of Northwest inverted!Asia. The European genes for blond hair and blue eyes are relatively recent mutations, after all.

Also, inverted!Africa and inverted!SouthAmerica are much closer than the real ones, and depending on what happened on this map in terms of undersea geology, it's conceivable that people would have crossed that gap as early as or earlier than they crossed the Bering Strait in our own history, spreading up through the inverted!Americas in something not unlike a reverse of how they spread down through them in our world.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Pfhorrest » Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:12 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:Kind of like how no one ever got to the Americas except by boat?

None of the narrow passages between continents in the inverted map are likely to be covered by ice bridges like the Bering Strait was.

But there is a remarkably narrow gap between inverted!Africa inverted!Eurasia to claim that no one would cross it until advanced seafaring was developed.

I didn't say advanced seafaring, just seafaring, and any seafaring at all is relatively advanced compared to what was required to walk across the Suez Isthmus into Eurasia in our world.

I would expect people to live in inverted!Eurasia for at least as long as they've been in our Australia

That's an interesting point, and made me realize I'm not sure how and when indigenous people got to Australia. Wikipedia suggests they walked across a land bridge that existed at the time. I suppose it's possible that land bridges could have existed spanning the narrow straits connecting Africa to the rest of the world in this inverted map, too, depending on what the deeper geology beyond the superficial coastlines is like.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby AndrewGPaul » Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:24 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
svenman wrote:
Quizatzhaderac wrote:Image
10 Internets if you get the joke in this one.

The names of Russia and Belarus have been swapped. Is that supposed to be funny?
It is if you know what "Belarus" means.


"White Russia"?

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby gmalivuk » Thu Mar 19, 2015 7:26 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:Kind of like how no one ever got to the Americas except by boat?

None of the narrow passages between continents in the inverted map are likely to be covered by ice bridges like the Bering Strait was.
Have scientists abandoned the land bridge hypothesis when I wasn't paying attention?
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby svenman » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:09 pm UTC

Quizatzhaderac wrote:Yes, if you understand why they're swapped.

Oh, is the map from the link supposed to be a negative?

...still don't find it all that funny, though.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Quizatzhaderac » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:33 pm UTC

AndrewGPaul wrote:"White Russia"?
Yes, the map is a palette swap: the white and black pixels were switched, as were the black and white Russias.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby mathmannix » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:35 pm UTC

gmalivuk wrote:
Pfhorrest wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:Kind of like how no one ever got to the Americas except by boat?

None of the narrow passages between continents in the inverted map are likely to be covered by ice bridges like the Bering Strait was.
Have scientists abandoned the land bridge hypothesis when I wasn't paying attention?

So, just out of curiosity, what's the new potential land bridge (i.e. shallow continental shelf that moves above land when glaciation occurs). Spain to Japan to Quebec?
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Alaska Girl » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:36 pm UTC

mathmannix wrote:...In Asia, Bahrain might be too small to make out at resolution, but it appears that Qatar and Kuwait have been by absorbed (by Saudi Arabia, or possibly Iraq for the latter.) Only one of the Transcaucuses is shown, Georgia - I don't even see a boundary between Iran and Russia, so it may be that Russia has taken over Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Iran. And although none of Asia currently south of about 16 degrees North is shown (denying us a look at mainland Malaysia and Cambodia), quite disturbingly, it looks to me like Thailand is now covered in water.
To say nothing of the fact that Alaska seems not only to have lost half its landmass, but to have become part of Canada! Thankfully the goon A Buttery Pastry seems to have corrected the size issue at least in his version.

Reverend Loki wrote:It looks like Sarah Palin can see China from her house.
Ah, no. That would be either Chile and Argentina to the south, or still Russia (but east, and with South Africa).

TomTAC wrote:There are two little islands, about a mile apart and straddling the International Date Line, almost exactly halfway between Russia and Alaska.

Four possibilities:
1) They moved with Alaska. 2) They moved with Siberia.
Or not so good:
3) They are STILL halfway between them, in the warm tropical Atlantic, but thousands of miles away from the nearest land and so the inhabitants are rather stuck for groceries this month. The two islands at least had their two ports facing each other over a seawater channel, but now the ports face away from each other on the deep side of each island.
Or terrible:
4) They stayed in place just turning around. So they are deep in the Arctic Ocean, waaaay away from everybody, and it is still winter but at least almost spring.
Ah yes - the Diomedes. Diomedi? Anyhow, good point. How about possibility #5: Big Diomede went with Russia, Little Diomede went with Alaska/USA. I think option four seems most likely though (for Hawaii too, I'm assuming - it's not on the map either), going by what happened to the other islands.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby svenman » Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:57 pm UTC

Pfhorrest wrote:
gmalivuk wrote:Kind of like how no one ever got to the Americas except by boat?

None of the narrow passages between continents in the inverted map are likely to be covered by ice bridges like the Bering Strait was.

But as you concede further down, land bridges might have formed there, depending on the depth of the sea floor there, while sea levels were lower during ice ages. Also, during ice ages, areas that are now desert may have been fertile on that map just like in our world, thus not forming obstacles to human migration.

Pfhorrest wrote:
I would expect people to live in inverted!Eurasia for at least as long as they've been in our Australia

That's an interesting point, and made me realize I'm not sure how and when indigenous people got to Australia. Wikipedia suggests they walked across a land bridge that existed at the time.

Wikipedia does? Certainly neither here nor here. In fact, Australia was never during the existence of humans linked by land bridges all the way to another continent, the immigration of humans to Australia must necessarily have involved sea travel.

Pfhorrest wrote:I suppose it's possible that land bridges could have existed spanning the narrow straits connecting Africa to the rest of the world in this inverted map, too, depending on what the deeper geology beyond the superficial coastlines is like.

Here you make the point about land bridges yourself.

Of course, one can also take the view that with such a radically altered geography (and a necessarily also radically altered tectonical history of the earth behind it), evolution itself would have taken a totally different development than in the world we know, and whatever species might have arisen in that world, they would be totally unrecognizable to us. Whether an intelligent and technologically capable species comparable to ours would have evolved at all, is anyone's guess.

(Edit: added missing blank)
Last edited by svenman on Sun Apr 05, 2015 1:18 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby ps.02 » Fri Mar 20, 2015 2:29 am UTC

Klear wrote:What I meant was that when I look at a map that's simply turned upside down (which I don't remember seeing prior to this comic), it really does show me that the world is quite different, most notably how Europe looks small and insignificant compared to basically everything else when the north-centre bias is eliminated. It really is an interesting thing to see.

Ah - one of today's lucky 10000. I think this comic is predicated upon the assumption that you have seen the inverted map before, and the punchline is the subverted expectation: "Oh, that thing, yeah ... wait ... that's not what he did."

That said, you're right: when you see a map that doesn't subtly emphasise the northern hemisphere by, e.g., cropping out the Southern Ocean, it does make you wish that all maps used in education and public discourse were as honest.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby zerox » Fri Mar 20, 2015 7:33 am UTC

mathmannix wrote:
speising wrote:i like this clear image helpful:
Image

especially the hilarious difference between "British Islands" and "British Isles".

Wouldn't "British Islands" include, oh I don't know, the Falklands and Pitcairn, et. al.?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Islands

Falklands and Pitcairn are British Overseas Territories

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby ximenes » Fri Mar 20, 2015 1:45 pm UTC

Just to be clear - the punchline is supposed to be a pun, right?

"Perspective" is meant in a literal sense, i.e. literally the angle from which your eyes are taking in the visual information through the map, and not "perspective" in a more abstract and conceptual sense, i.e. your attitude towards the world and the countries in it.

The usual "fully" upside-down map that most of us have seen before is supposed to change your perspective in the latter conceptual sense; Randall's map is supposed to change your perspective in the more mundane literal sense.

That's the joke, right?

(Apologies if this was obvious to everyone already)

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby gmalivuk » Fri Mar 20, 2015 3:17 pm UTC

There need not be any pun, it's just a subversion of the other kind of upside-down map.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby OP Tipping » Sun Mar 22, 2015 4:15 am UTC

Diddleydoo wrote:On a clarification to my earlier post.

If indeed you are referring to "southern Ireland" as "northern Ireland" having been rotated, this is also incorrect since the terms "United Kingdom" and "Great Britain" both already include "northern (southern) Ireland".

The fact that many actually refer to "Ireland" as "southern Ireland" is a constant point of annoyance to me and many others from the country.



What you talking about, Kosmo.

The United Kingdom is the short name for a country called The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

That's its real name.

Great Britain is the largest island in TUKOGBANI, and is not synonymous with it.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby EvilDuckie » Sun Mar 22, 2015 7:47 am UTC

Klear wrote:I feel like I don't get this. I find a normal map rotated as a whole a much more powerful perspective-changing experience. I'm guessing this is sort of a troll attempt, trying to confuse people until they notice the landmasses are shifted around?


There's a lot of "amazing maps that will blow your mind" floating around on social media, a lot of them not particulary interesting such as "all airports in the USA", "all rivers in the world" (imho not even maps, just data... and sometimes with glaring errors). I think RM is trolling them. It took me a second or two to get this (as there had recently been one doing the rounds that was just an upside-down map)
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby PayasYouDraw » Sun Mar 22, 2015 5:34 pm UTC

I really enjoyed this one.

Looks like my London-Gibraltar flights won't be much longer than they are now, though they will be trans-polar.
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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby Shadowman615 » Mon Mar 23, 2015 4:54 pm UTC

You guys have waaaaaay over-complicated the UK joke.

The full name of the UK is "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland." After rotating the island we would therefore have to change the name to "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Southern Ireland," after moving Northern Ireland.

That is all. It has nothing to do with what the remaining part of Ireland is called, and has nothing to do with what specific countries make up the UK.

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Re: 1500: Upside-Down Map

Postby brenok » Mon Mar 23, 2015 7:58 pm UTC

Shadowman615 wrote:You guys have waaaaaay over-complicated the UK joke.

If by "you guys" you mean "exactly one person, who was promptly corrected multiple times"


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