1741: "Work"

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NeatNit
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1741: "Work"

Postby NeatNit » Mon Oct 03, 2016 2:35 pm UTC

Image

Alt text: Despite it being imaginary, I already have SUCH a strong opinion on the cord-switch firing incident.

In an ideal world that would be true, but we all know that in reality, no one in the industries actually cares.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby squall_line » Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:02 pm UTC

Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Flumble » Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:25 pm UTC

While tables and glasses are arguably simple objects, your average desk lamp is pretty complex: at least different 3 pieces for the base, arm and shade, wiring throughout all, rubber bumps and a switch somewhere. And as the shades are made of plastics nowadays (cheap-cheap!), there's also a metal sheet glued to the inside to reflect more light (assuming a halogen/incandescent lamp) and to prevent the shade from melting. And that's only the complexity of the product.
That's more complex than some couches! (That doesn't sound really mind-blowing.)

squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

I guess it's more like a Poisson curve: slight tipping if there's barely any design time (you just add some glitter to a standard cup), lots of tipping if there's a bit of design time (start with a model of godzilla, then add glitter, then you're out of time to debate or evaluate tip resistance) and again slight tipping if there's a lot of design time (start with godzilla, add glitter, debate, add more glitter, test prototype, add flat base, customer review, replace design with standard cup with a print of godzilla and glitter, ship).

[edit]For the base shape of cups, see this thread.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby DanD » Mon Oct 03, 2016 3:30 pm UTC

NeatNit wrote:In an ideal world that would be true, but we all know that in reality, no one in the industries actually cares.


I'm guessing you've never actually worked in "the industries"? And aren't an engineer in general?

I'm not actually on the consumer products side of things, but I routinely work with engineers that are (on production equipment for their designs). And I can absolutely tell you that almost all products have a fair amount of concern going into their design. And on the side I am on, I jump through extreme hoops, because no piece of machinery I've ever designed has permanently injured or killed anyone (yes, I had a tech receive short term injury and I felt horrible about it), and I would prefer to keep it that way. To say nothing of the efforts to maintain ROHS, UL/CE, and remove conflict minerals (let alone CITES, although that's not usually a problem in my field) from designs.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby cellocgw » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:14 pm UTC

On the subject of cup design,

Which is better -- a pessimist's half-empty cup, an optimist's half-full cup, or a greedy person's Pythagorean Cup ?
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby orthogon » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:20 pm UTC

I've been doing quite a lot of DIY recently, and as a result I found myself getting overwhelmed contemplating any interior space. Just thinking that each and every brick, tile or flooring plank was laid or fitted by hand by somebody, every square metre of wall was painted, twice or three times, is often more than I can handle. And it's even worse when I start considering all the little problems that had to be solved, all the awkward cuts and all the annoyances that had to be worked around.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby somitomi » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:27 pm UTC

squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.

I never really liked switches being on cords, they tend to be a nuisance. Why can't they just put a switch in the housing, where it would stop swingin' around?
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Tyndmyr » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:36 pm UTC

squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.


The fastest cup I've ever designed was just a cylinder on the outside, with a slightly graduated cylinder extruded inside for testing purposes of the printer. Worked fine, not tippy at all.

A lot of time goes into the objects around us, but a great quantity of it has little relationship to function. At least on consumer grade stuff like cups. It's rather different for aircraft, I imagine.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby taixzo » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:48 pm UTC

How do they make metal shapes like that lamp anyway? Is it pressed?
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby duckshirt » Mon Oct 03, 2016 4:52 pm UTC

DanD wrote:
NeatNit wrote:In an ideal world that would be true, but we all know that in reality, no one in the industries actually cares.


I'm guessing you've never actually worked in "the industries"? And aren't an engineer in general?

I'm not actually on the consumer products side of things, but I routinely work with engineers that are (on production equipment for their designs). And I can absolutely tell you that almost all products have a fair amount of concern going into their design. And on the side I am on, I jump through extreme hoops, because no piece of machinery I've ever designed has permanently injured or killed anyone (yes, I had a tech receive short term injury and I felt horrible about it), and I would prefer to keep it that way. To say nothing of the efforts to maintain ROHS, UL/CE, and remove conflict minerals (let alone CITES, although that's not usually a problem in my field) from designs.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Flumble » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:14 pm UTC

taixzo wrote:How do they make metal shapes like that lamp anyway? Is it pressed?

I'm no metal worker, but the internet implies it's mostly pressing/stamping and spinning. It seems to me that spinning is more of a quality/luxurious method though, since a good press is done in a couple of seconds whereas spinning takes minutes (at least, that's what I gather from the youtubes).

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby DanD » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:19 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:
taixzo wrote:How do they make metal shapes like that lamp anyway? Is it pressed?

I'm no metal worker, but the internet implies it's mostly pressing/stamping and spinning. It seems to me that spinning is more of a quality/luxurious method though, since a good press is done in a couple of seconds whereas spinning takes minutes (at least, that's what I gather from the youtubes).


Stamping is going to be more common for high volume work. The tooling for spinning is cheaper, so it's more common for mid-volume work, and can do deeper drawn work and more complex parts, so it shows up occasionally in some higher volume applications. Hydroforming is also a neat technology, which is basically stamping with one side of the tool being water.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Nyktos » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:21 pm UTC

somitomi wrote:
squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.

I never really liked switches being on cords, they tend to be a nuisance. Why can't they just put a switch in the housing, where it would stop swingin' around?
It depends on where the lamp is going. For a bedside lamp I'd much rather have the switch on the cord, because I'm less likely to knock over my glass of water when reaching for it in the dark that way.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Mahnarch » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:35 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:I guess it's more like a Poisson curve: slight tipping if there's barely any design time (you just add some glitter to a standard cup), lots of tipping if there's a bit of design time (start with a model of godzilla, then add glitter, then you're out of time to debate or evaluate tip resistance) and again slight tipping if there's a lot of design time (start with godzilla, add glitter, debate, add more glitter, test prototype, add flat base, customer review, replace design with standard cup with a print of godzilla and glitter, ship)



I want a Godzilla cup.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby orthogon » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:50 pm UTC

Nyktos wrote:
somitomi wrote:
squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.

I never really liked switches being on cords, they tend to be a nuisance. Why can't they just put a switch in the housing, where it would stop swingin' around?
It depends on where the lamp is going. For a bedside lamp I'd much rather have the switch on the cord, because I'm less likely to knock over my glass of water when reaching for it in the dark that way.

Also those switches inside the lampshade of a table- or floor-lamp are incredibly difficult to find, in my experience. At least the cord is a one-dimensional object that's susceptible to an exhaustive search: starting from the lamp or the plug you're bound to find it, even in the dark. On the other hand, those push-buttons on the back of an anglepoise are pretty good.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Whizbang » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:51 pm UTC

I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby rmsgrey » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:56 pm UTC

orthogon wrote:On the other hand, those push-buttons on the back of an anglepoise are pretty good.


Depends how hot the anglepoise runs - the switch itself may be safe to handle, but the cone itself is not something I'd want to discover the location of by brushing against.

Also, a switch on the arm/light will tend to change the light's position slightly each time you operate it...

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Edwoodca » Mon Oct 03, 2016 5:58 pm UTC

"sometimes I get overwhelmed thinking about the amount of work that went into the ordinary objects around me"

I don't think of the things around me much, but for many years I've imagined being a cavemen tasked with building a simple #2 Pencil. Or a skyscraper.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby squall_line » Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:24 pm UTC

Nyktos wrote:
somitomi wrote:
squall_line wrote:Do cups with fewer person-hours of design and debate tip more or less frequently than those designed in 'haste'?

As far as the switch being on the cord, I'd hope that particular lamp is plugged in to a switched outlet. I, personally, wouldn't want a switched cord on a desk lamp where the switch was under the desk surface; it seems an unnecessary hassle to turn on and off that way.

I never really liked switches being on cords, they tend to be a nuisance. Why can't they just put a switch in the housing, where it would stop swingin' around?
It depends on where the lamp is going. For a bedside lamp I'd much rather have the switch on the cord, because I'm less likely to knock over my glass of water when reaching for it in the dark that way.


I prefer the in-line cord switch on my bedside lamp for the same reason. I also prefer it because the shade is more or less holding the lamp in place, which would make using a shade-mounted switch difficult, as rmsgrey mentioned.

It's one of those spin-type switches, and I'm somewhat surprised that I get it to spin in the correct direction on the first try when I reach for it every night.

By the same token, I only ever turn that light off by feel since I use it to read before bed. If I get up in the middle of the night I leave the lights off and early-morning lighting is solved by the remote for my ceiling fan (which is also handy for middle-of-the-night temperature control. If you've never had the pleasure of a remote-controlled ceiling fan in your bedroom, I highly recommend it.).

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby trpmb6 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:35 pm UTC

Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.


My grandmother had one of these. After my grandfather passed away we moved her into an apartment by herself. After a few months she swore that my grandfather was turning the lamp on. She said she would turn the lamp off, leave the room and then later that day it would be on again. For the longest time we just believed she was dealing with grief and maybe some slight dementia. That was, until, my mother and myself both observed it happen independently of each other. After that we observed it happening on numerous occasions. There was nothing touching the lamp, metallic or otherwise, and there wasn't a switch tied to the circuit that turned the outlet the lamp was plugged into on or off. I genuinely never figured out what was causing it. My best guess: it's either supernatural or there was a faulty circuit inside the lamp. In which case it's a miracle my grandfather didn't burn down that apartment.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Pfhorrest » Mon Oct 03, 2016 6:39 pm UTC

I often have thoughts like this about food, and about the unbelievable increase in purchasing power of even the poorest resident of a modern developed country vs basically every other human being who ever lived throughout all of history.

Say you go to your favorite cheapest fast food restaurant and buy the $1 cheeseburger off their value menu.

Someone had to grow, harvest, and mill wheat to make flour.
Someone had to grow, harvest, and mill sugar cane/beets/etc to make sugar.
Someone had to grow, harvest, and press some source of vegetable oil.
Someone had to mine salt.
Someone had to... I don't even know where you get yeast from.
Someone had to mix all of those together in the right proportion and heat them for the right time and temperature.
...just to make the bun.

Someone had to raise and slaughter and butcher cows to get the beef, that someone else had to grind and pack and grill to make the burger patty.

Someone had to raise different cows and milk them to get milk. Then someone else had to process that milk with other ingredients in a process at least as complicated as the bread-making in order to get cheese.

Someone had to grow and harvest lettuce.
Someone had to grow and harvest tomatoes.
Someone had to grow and harvest onions (maybe? I'm not too sure what all comes on a $1 value menu burger).
Someone had to take some of those tomatoes and... oh boy, first... someone had to grow and harvest grapes, then someone had to juice those grapes, then someone had to [however you get yeast] and mix that with the juice and age it to get wine, age it some more to get vinegar... THEN someone can mix that with the tomatoes and some of that sugar someone made earlier to make just the goddamn ketchup.
Someone had to grow and harvest and mill mustard seed and mix it with probably more of that vinegar and sugar to make mustard.
Someone had to grow and harvest cucumbers, jar them together with some of that salt and/or vinegar from earlier, age them, to make pickles, that someone else then had to dice up to make relish.

Many someones had pack and store and and ship all of these things all around the world, not to mention the many, many someones who had to build all of the many tools all these people used to accomplish all of these tasks, and the many other someones who mined and refined and otherwise produced the raw materials that those tools are made of, and the many other someones who worked in innumerable capacities to supply the energy used by all of those processes.

And of course someone got paid minimum wage to assemble all those pieces together for you.

And that someone can himself purchase the product of all of that unfathomable chain of labor for less than ten minutes' worth of his wage.

Fucking blows my mind.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby sonar1313 » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:12 pm UTC

duckshirt wrote:
DanD wrote:
NeatNit wrote:In an ideal world that would be true, but we all know that in reality, no one in the industries actually cares.


I'm guessing you've never actually worked in "the industries"? And aren't an engineer in general?

I'm not actually on the consumer products side of things, but I routinely work with engineers that are (on production equipment for their designs). And I can absolutely tell you that almost all products have a fair amount of concern going into their design. And on the side I am on, I jump through extreme hoops, because no piece of machinery I've ever designed has permanently injured or killed anyone (yes, I had a tech receive short term injury and I felt horrible about it), and I would prefer to keep it that way. To say nothing of the efforts to maintain ROHS, UL/CE, and remove conflict minerals (let alone CITES, although that's not usually a problem in my field) from designs.

Yeah, I came here to say this comic is actually a massive understatement

I came here to say I work in the auto industry.....and if anyone thinks this comic is a massive understatement, they themselves are still massively understating the massive understatement. Because it doesn't even touch on the challenges of engineering something with thousands over thousands of moving parts that can be made very very quickly at huge scales.

It's why, for example, there are a lot of people very skeptical that Tesla can move from tiny little niche player to mass production. Even considering the ridiculous, massive complexities of engineering a car, they're nothing compared to the even more galactic complexities of engineering that same car to be built at the rate of one every minute.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby HES » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:24 pm UTC

Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.

I take it you do not have cats.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby somitomi » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:49 pm UTC

rmsgrey wrote:Depends how hot the anglepoise runs - the switch itself may be safe to handle, but the cone itself is not something I'd want to discover the location of by brushing against.

Also, a switch on the arm/light will tend to change the light's position slightly each time you operate it...

I had a desk lamp (not exactly an anglepoise, but kind of similar, adjustable sort) with two switches: one on the cord, and a push-button on the top of the lampshade. I think the general idea is neat, but the switches were wired in series (for rather obvious reasons), and thus it was possible to switch the lamp off in such a manner, that neither of the swithes would turn it back on. It did lead to confusion a couple times.
Heat is yet another reason to buy LED bulbs. Although it is actually the same reason as the main reason: LEDs are efficient.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby DanD » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:55 pm UTC

somitomi wrote:Heat is yet another reason to buy LED bulbs. Although it is actually the same reason as the main reason: LEDs are efficient.


Sure. For those of you who see with what you laughably call visible light. For those of us who see in the IR...

Oh wait. Forget you read that. The invasion isn't until next week.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Archgeek » Mon Oct 03, 2016 8:42 pm UTC

DanD wrote:
somitomi wrote:Heat is yet another reason to buy LED bulbs. Although it is actually the same reason as the main reason: LEDs are efficient.


Sure. For those of you who see with what you laughably call visible light. For those of us who see in the IR...

Oh wait. Forget you read that. The invasion isn't until next week.


Amusingly, IR LEDs are pretty efficient too. The entertainingly small voltage drop needed for an IR LED is a portion of why TV remote batteries can last long enough for you to forget what kind of batteries a given remote takes without opening the cover.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby GalFisk » Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:11 pm UTC

I've nurtured a related thought: if you look around you in our modern society, nearly every little thing you see began its existence as an idea inside a human mind. That is the immense power of our species that we oftentimes take for granted.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Whizbang » Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:18 pm UTC

trpmb6 wrote:
Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.


My grandmother had one of these. After my grandfather passed away we moved her into an apartment by herself. After a few months she swore that my grandfather was turning the lamp on. She said she would turn the lamp off, leave the room and then later that day it would be on again. For the longest time we just believed she was dealing with grief and maybe some slight dementia. That was, until, my mother and myself both observed it happen independently of each other. After that we observed it happening on numerous occasions. There was nothing touching the lamp, metallic or otherwise, and there wasn't a switch tied to the circuit that turned the outlet the lamp was plugged into on or off. I genuinely never figured out what was causing it. My best guess: it's either supernatural or there was a faulty circuit inside the lamp. In which case it's a miracle my grandfather didn't burn down that apartment.


We have one as well, probably from the same era (inherited from parents), and it does the same thing. Just randomly turns on for no apparent reason. I did some simple Google searches on fixes, but my electrician skills stop rather abruptly at being able to plug and unplug things into the outlet and maybe resetting a breaker in the panel, so I aborted my attempt to fix the lamp. I just used it as an excuse to perform magic by turning it off with a touch a few times a day before we retired it to the attic.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby DanD » Mon Oct 03, 2016 9:20 pm UTC

Archgeek wrote:
DanD wrote:
somitomi wrote:Heat is yet another reason to buy LED bulbs. Although it is actually the same reason as the main reason: LEDs are efficient.


Sure. For those of you who see with what you laughably call visible light. For those of us who see in the IR...

Oh wait. Forget you read that. The invasion isn't until next week.


Amusingly, IR LEDs are pretty efficient too. The entertainingly small voltage drop needed for an IR LED is a portion of why TV remote batteries can last long enough for you to forget what kind of batteries a given remote takes without opening the cover.


Yes, but you aren't installing those, are you. And the stupid flashlights, I guess that's what you mean by "TV remote", pulse to much to be useful.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Archgeek » Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:34 pm UTC

DanD wrote:
Archgeek wrote:Amusingly, IR LEDs are pretty efficient too. The entertainingly small voltage drop needed for an IR LED is a portion of why TV remote batteries can last long enough for you to forget what kind of batteries a given remote takes without opening the cover.


Yes, but you aren't installing those, are you. And the stupid flashlights, I guess that's what you mean by "TV remote", pulse to much to be useful.

Not a thing on the planet stopping me. Heck, I've shoved four of the things on a 555 timer aimed at specific frequency band to play the role of targeting beacon in a robotics competition before.

Stupid...flashlights? No, I mean television remote control. They blink codes out an IR LED at a reciever on the TV, cable box, or blu-ray player. And last I checked, arbitrary signaling has been proven to be pretty dang useful.

For illumnation specifically, I'm pretty sure those night-time security cameras use them to iluminate their coverage areas, that or that big ring of LEDs around the lens is actually meant to emit white light for panicking intruders and shattering their night vision...but I feel quietly recording them in an IR glow and piping the video off to a security company or the local police alongside a silent alarm'd be a lot more effective.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Flumble » Mon Oct 03, 2016 10:36 pm UTC

Mahnarch wrote:I want a Godzilla cup.

The one that tips over at the slightest touch?

DanD wrote:Yes, but you aren't installing those, are you. And the stupid flashlights, I guess that's what you mean by "TV remote", pulse to much to be useful.

Why would you want (near/short/middle/long) IR lighting in the first place? IANAIRV, but I estimate most objects, including walls, have enough irregularities to see them as long as they're not too cold.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Archgeek » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:19 pm UTC

Flumble wrote:
DanD wrote:Yes, but you aren't installing those, are you. And the stupid flashlights, I guess that's what you mean by "TV remote", pulse to much to be useful.

Why would you want (near/short/middle/long) IR lighting in the first place? IANAIRV, but I estimate most objects, including walls, have enough irregularities to see them as long as they're not too cold.

... "I Am Not An Irregular Recreational Vehicle"?

Oh...yeah...duh. An IR cam would see intruders as blazing furnaces relative to a cool room. Perhaps to catch marauding reptiles? Undead creatures? Golems, stone, iron, or otherwise?
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Soupspoon » Mon Oct 03, 2016 11:31 pm UTC

At the opposite end of the spectrum, I keep meaning to get some UV light-source (not one that glows in the visible, like the old flourescent tube banknote illuminators) and maybe something like varnish with UV-to-visible component in it and mark up the woodland trails down to my house (the back way) with strategic dabs of the varnish on the trees to guide me home better at night...

(I have decent night vision, if I don't use a torch and destroy it from the returning spotlight, but imagine if I had some UV LEDs glowing atop my hat, for example, not visible to me or others but making small dots or rings or arrows glow on trees to keep me going down the right trail...)

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Adacore » Tue Oct 04, 2016 12:18 am UTC

This was something that didn't really fully hit me until I took an design engineering class. One of the first things covered was the fact that almost literally everything modern humans interact with has been designed, often with considerable effort, by numerous engineers. I mean, obviously my computer was designed, but so was the paper cup I'm drinking instant coffee out of. So was the packet the instant coffee came in (long and thin, so it can act as a stirrer if I was lacking a spoon). Literally everything I can see from where I am right now (humans and plants excepted) was, at some point, designed by an engineer.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby somitomi » Tue Oct 04, 2016 8:17 am UTC

Flumble wrote:Why would you want (near/short/middle/long) IR lighting in the first place? IANAIRV, but I estimate most objects, including walls, have enough irregularities to see them as long as they're not too cold.

I've seen some security camera reviews (don't know why though, I have little interest in them), the ones in the reviews use the LEDs for nitgh-time IR illumination. I think the reason is that camera sensors sensitive to near-infrared (214–400 THz) are cheaper than those capable of detecting the thermal radiation of humans (20–37 THz), which has much lower energy.
ETA: By strange coincidence, a lecturer at university mentioned today, that the price of a thermal camera starts at $400. I also realised mobile phone cameras are sensitive to near infrared (source: check TV remotes with mobile phone trick), so that's even cheaper than I thought.
Last edited by somitomi on Tue Oct 04, 2016 2:17 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Soupspoon » Tue Oct 04, 2016 10:14 am UTC

Adacore wrote:the packet the instant coffee came in (long and thin, so it can act as a stirrer if I was lacking a spoon).

Spoiler:
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... my guess was either that the packaging machines needed a certain height of package, but not much width because of not much contents, or to save upon the 'useless' crimping (full height, once, two minimal full-widths).

I'd never have considered stirring with the package, though. The outside surface which has been touched by chamber maids(/boys), who are probably sanitary or there are other problems, or previous guests rifling past them on the way to the tea bags or hot chocolate, whose potential hygene deficiencies are what the chamber-people are partly there to mitigate for.

Maybe I'd empty the packet and then take the effort to invert it, otherwise intact, and have the 'inside' only in contact with my hot beverage.

(Although I tend to pour the water in non-axially, to create a swirl that continues to help mix even as I procede to pour the sugar/sweetner/all-and-every-available-sugar-and-sweetners-together, and then finally2 the milk-or-milkalike1, which is the most visible indicator of success w.r.t. the ultimate homogeneity of the self-mixing fluids...)

1 Have you noticed that little round dimple near the end of the whitener tub's "spout flap"? It actually shapes the pouring 'milk' stream on its way to the tab-end to ensure an easily pourable stream. I worked that out at perhaps age 10, and was enthralled...
2 Before the dissolving of the powder, it would slightly depress the temperature, and thus the initial solubility rate, of the coffee. At least in my mind. No scientific studies have been made by me of this effect.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Wee Red Bird » Tue Oct 04, 2016 10:18 am UTC

Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.

My friends have one on their dining table. When I help pull the thing out, I grab the lamp to steady it, followed by the odd "bugger" as I tap it a few times to turn it back off.

squall_line wrote:If I get up in the middle of the night I leave the lights off ...

I leave the bedroom light off, as not to disturb the other half, but put the hall and bathroom ones on. I use the old pirate trick and keep one eye shut so I still have night vision when I return to the darkened bedroom.

somitomi wrote:Heat is yet another reason to buy LED bulbs. Although it is actually the same reason as the main reason: LEDs are efficient.

I've yet to find a 240V G9 bulb that doesn't flicker. Most of the ones online have non-eu CE marks and a room lit with them shows quite a lot of mains flicker and poor brightness and colour range. Though have a few normal sized LEDs that don't have those problems. Even have a nice Edison style LED bulb.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby RCT Bob » Tue Oct 04, 2016 11:42 am UTC

trpmb6 wrote:
Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.


My grandmother had one of these. After my grandfather passed away we moved her into an apartment by herself. After a few months she swore that my grandfather was turning the lamp on. She said she would turn the lamp off, leave the room and then later that day it would be on again. For the longest time we just believed she was dealing with grief and maybe some slight dementia. That was, until, my mother and myself both observed it happen independently of each other. After that we observed it happening on numerous occasions. There was nothing touching the lamp, metallic or otherwise, and there wasn't a switch tied to the circuit that turned the outlet the lamp was plugged into on or off. I genuinely never figured out what was causing it. My best guess: it's either supernatural or there was a faulty circuit inside the lamp. In which case it's a miracle my grandfather didn't burn down that apartment.


I once had a lamp like that too in a room I rented for my internship, and I experienced that too. The lamp would sometimes turn itself on or off, I never really figured out how that worked either. I think the lamp was too sensitive and responded to random noise in the environment, like vibrations from trains passing outside. Sometimes it would turn on and off in fairly rapid succession, as in, several times per minute.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby Shamino » Tue Oct 04, 2016 2:09 pm UTC

Whizbang wrote:I really like those lamps that turn on and off just by touching them. It is like magic.

They're nice, but the electronics don't survive as long as the rest of the lamp.

I bought a touch-control module and attached it to a desk lamp. It worked great for a few years. Then it started switching on and off randomly or would stop responding altogether. I ended up removing it again and going back to the mechanical switch.

I also notice, amusingly enough, that when I'm sick with a cold or flu, devices with touch sensors (but, fortunately, not my smartphone) don't respond very well (or at all). I assume illness changes the capacitance of my skin such that simple sensors can't detect a touch.
Last edited by Shamino on Thu Aug 09, 2018 2:15 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 1741: "Work"

Postby orthogon » Tue Oct 04, 2016 3:28 pm UTC

RCT Bob wrote:I once had a lamp like that too in a room I rented for my internship, and I experienced that too. The lamp would sometimes turn itself on or off, I never really figured out how that worked either. I think the lamp was too sensitive and responded to random noise in the environment, like vibrations from trains passing outside. Sometimes it would turn on and off in fairly rapid succession, as in, several times per minute.

My wife had one of those, which developed the same fault, and eventually I ended up removing the touch-sensitive circuitry and fitting a switch in the cable. We lost the choice of three different brightness levels, but it was better than having it turn on and off all the time.
xtifr wrote:... and orthogon merely sounds undecided.


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