RELATIVITY QUESTIONS! (and other common queries)

For the discussion of the sciences. Physics problems, chemistry equations, biology weirdness, it all goes here.

Moderators: gmalivuk, Prelates, Moderators General

RELATIVITY QUESTIONS! (and other common queries)

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:58 am UTC

Mod edit: Due to some unfortunate deletions, the first post of this thread is now missing. It is reproduced in the quote box below. Sir Elderberry's post follows it.

Meteorswarm wrote:It seems the most common topic we get repeated questions on is relativity, general and special. Seriously, this thread is stickied and has relativity right in the title. Now it's even in all caps and the first word. So please ask such questions here. Or maybe read some of this thread to see if your question has already been asked and answered. - gmalivuk

Since we seem to see a lot of repeated things in this forum, it might be a good thing to compile simple, fast answers here. If you have a simple "how does this work?" question, this is the place. It is NOT the place to answer questions at length; any question worthy of lengthy response deserves its own thread. If your question involves light, please see the relativity statement below. I'll get the list started with a few things:

Gravity travels at the speed of light, 299792458 meters/second. This has been closely validated with an experiment, but it mostly comes from theory since it isn't easy to measure.

The laws of thermodynamics are very, very true. You cannot get free energy, no matter how nice it would be, and no matter how much science fiction you read.

For everything we know about, including the matter you're made of, we cannot travel faster than, or even at the speed of light. The reason is that as you approach the speed of light, you gain kinetic energy at a much faster rate than you do at low speeds. This is why small particles going REALLY close to c, the speed of light, can pack a lot of energy.

Light does not have (rest) mass. Photons only travel at c through a vacuum.

Light acts as both a particle and a wave.

Incidentally, everything acts as both a particle and a wave. You, me, cars, George Bush.

The big bang was an expansion of space itself, not just stuff within space. This is often hard to visualize.

If your question involves traveling at the speed of light, a light source and an apparent paradox, please read about special relativity, or consider that the speed of light is constant to everybody and derive it yourself. Also, see Sir Elderberry's excellent post on the subject.

Please add your own! Also, if I'm wrong, correct me.

Edit 2008.12.03 added SR response
Edit 2009.04.10 beefed up SR response with the aid of Sir Elderberry, changed topic statement to reflect changed nature of thread - it is actually a place to ask questions you think have a short answer


Not only does matter not travel faster than light, neither does information. No matter how hard you spin those entangled photons.
http://www.geekyhumanist.blogspot.com -- Science and the Concerned Voter
Belial wrote:You are the coolest guy that ever cooled.

I reiterate. Coolest. Guy.

Well. You heard him.
User avatar
Sir_Elderberry
 
Posts: 4207
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:50 pm UTC
Location: Sector ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha

Re: Common Questions

Postby ArmonSore » Fri Jan 04, 2008 3:29 am UTC

The only change that I'd make (that didn't come at the cost of brevity) is that everything is both a particle and a wave. Electrons, protons, neutrinos, etc. Not just photons.
I was useful Yesterday.
-Paul McCartney.
User avatar
ArmonSore
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2007 10:40 pm UTC
Location: Pennsylvania, United States

Re: Common Questions

Postby Eps » Fri Jan 04, 2008 4:53 am UTC

Change "roughly validated" to "validated to a high degree of accuracy" for the speed of gravity.

Another common misconception: The idea that "quantum physics and relativity are completely irreconcilable" is not correct. Quantum mechanics and special relativity have been combined to a high degree of success: QED, one resulting major theory, is the most accurately-validated physical theory in existence.
User avatar
Eps
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:07 pm UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby OneLess » Fri Jan 04, 2008 8:41 am UTC

{Edited by OneLess to remove idiocy.}
Last edited by OneLess on Sat Jan 19, 2008 8:37 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
“Observation: Couldn’t see a thing. Conclusion: Dinosaurs.” –Carl Sagan

Last edited by OneLess on Sat Dec 17, 3003 10:35 am, edited 0 time in total.
User avatar
OneLess
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 5:10 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Hawknc » Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:01 am UTC

OneLess wrote:-(Conventional) airplanes cannot take off from a treadmill :)

Oh, someone's looking for a banning.
User avatar
Hawknc
Oompa Loompa of SCIENCE!
 
Posts: 6974
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 5:14 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Common Questions

Postby Minerva » Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:31 pm UTC

I believe it was Feynman who said something to the effect of... (I can't remember the exact quote) "Light doesn't behave like a wave on Tuesdays and like a particle on Thursdays."

Light - and everything else for that matter - is not "both a particle and a wave". It is neither - but it displays some of the characteristics of both.
...suffer from the computer disease that anybody who works with computers now knows about. It's a very serious disease and it interferes completely with the work. The trouble with computers is you play with them. They are so wonderful. - Richard Feynman
User avatar
Minerva
 
Posts: 922
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 2:58 pm UTC
Location: Australia

Re: Common Questions

Postby UmbralRaptor » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:17 pm UTC

OneLess wrote:-(Conventional) airplanes cannot take off from a treadmill :)

From a conventional treadmill, anyway. A sufficiently large and strong one...
Why do you assume that I exist?
User avatar
UmbralRaptor
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 5:47 pm UTC
Location: Officially: KC area, Kansas, USA, Sol III

Re: Common Questions

Postby Indon » Fri Jan 04, 2008 10:27 pm UTC

UmbralRaptor wrote:
OneLess wrote:-(Conventional) airplanes cannot take off from a treadmill :)

From a conventional treadmill, anyway. A sufficiently large and strong one...

Except for Harrier Jets.
So, I like talking. So if you want to talk about something with me, feel free to send me a PM.

My blog, now rarely updated.

Image
User avatar
Indon
 
Posts: 4433
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:21 pm UTC
Location: Alabama :(

Re: Common Questions

Postby Tchebu » Sat Jan 05, 2008 12:55 am UTC

Light - and everything else for that matter - is not "both a particle and a wave". It is neither - but it displays some of the characteristics of both.


You mean all the properties of both. Unless you include negatives like "particles *don't* diffract"...

Unless i'm misinformed...
Our universe is most certainly unique... it's the only one that string theory doesn't describe.
Tchebu
 
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:42 am UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Common Questions

Postby J Spade » Sat Jan 05, 2008 3:18 am UTC

Please explain how space itself can expand if expanding means taking up more space.
User avatar
J Spade
Luppoewagan
 
Posts: 523
Joined: Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:56 pm UTC
Location: Up a creek without a paddle

Re: Common Questions

Postby Tchebu » Sat Jan 05, 2008 4:19 am UTC

Please explain how space itself can expand if expanding means taking up more space.


Well... the first thing you should conclude... is that "taking up more space" is not what is meant by "expanding" when the word comes out of the mouth of a physicist.

Basically it means that an object on which no force acts, actually moves away from you, rather than being immobile (unlike what newton's first law may say). And the further away it is, the faster it will move away.

The analogy commonly used is the surface of a baloon that's being blown up. Now just... you know... imagine that happening in more dimentions...
Our universe is most certainly unique... it's the only one that string theory doesn't describe.
Tchebu
 
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:42 am UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Common Questions

Postby genewitch » Sat Jan 05, 2008 8:36 pm UTC

how about the thought that nothing can escape black holes? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation

Yummy in my tummy! Microwave background radiation is also not common knowledge: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background_radiation

And re: plane on a treadmill, mythbusters january 30th are gunna put it to bed :-)
see preview of the two tests: http://dsc.discovery.com/video/?playerId=203711706&categoryId=210013704&lineupId=229524134&titleId=1344511100

anyone wanna take some bets on bragster? :-D
...C is for people who would rather sit at home and match up pairs of socks by the count of their elastic bands, than to just get dressed with mismatched shoes and take the lady out to dinner and nail her in the car on the way home -xkcd_n00bz
MyMusic
User avatar
genewitch
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 2:28 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby LoopQuantumGravity » Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:33 am UTC

genewitch wrote:And re: plane on a treadmill, mythbusters january 30th are gunna put it to bed :-)
see preview of the two tests: http://dsc.discovery.com/video/?playerId=203711706&categoryId=210013704&lineupId=229524134&titleId=1344511100


If they screw this one up, I'm going to be really pissed, because then I'll never be able to explain to people the right answer...
I study theoretical physics & strings, and am a recipient of the prestigious Jayne Cobb Hero of Canton award.

And the science gets done and you make a neat gun
For the people who are still alive!
User avatar
LoopQuantumGravity
 
Posts: 416
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:19 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Hawknc » Sun Jan 06, 2008 6:37 am UTC

They'll screw it up because it is physically impossible to set up. That video isn't working for me unfortunately, but it's fair to say that they'll pick one interpretation of the puzzle and test that, when there's multiple variants of it. How they set up the treadmill will be the key to it - will it be freely rotating, matching the speed of the wheels, matching the speed that the aircraft would be at on a flat surface? How are they going to deal with friction?
User avatar
Hawknc
Oompa Loompa of SCIENCE!
 
Posts: 6974
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2006 5:14 am UTC
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Common Questions

Postby Durandal » Sun Jan 06, 2008 7:41 am UTC

.
Last edited by Durandal on Wed Jul 08, 2009 4:40 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
Durandal
 
Posts: 659
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 12:12 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby hyperion » Sun Jan 06, 2008 8:42 am UTC

Durandal wrote:I've never understood why exactly an airplane would take off on a treadmill... I mean, it's not the airplane moving fast in relation to the ground that allows the wings to displace a sufficient amount of air, but the airplane moving fast in relation to the surrounding atmosphere...

Please don't start this again. Read this thread.
Peshmerga wrote:A blow job would probably get you a LOT of cheeseburgers.
But I digress.
User avatar
hyperion
"I'll show ye...."
 
Posts: 1569
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 2:16 pm UTC
Location: Perth

Re: Common Questions

Postby OneLess » Sun Jan 06, 2008 9:12 am UTC

OneLess wrote:-(Conventional) airplanes cannot take off from a treadmill :)

Okay, better scientific fact: I'm an idiot.
“Observation: Couldn’t see a thing. Conclusion: Dinosaurs.” –Carl Sagan

Last edited by OneLess on Sat Dec 17, 3003 10:35 am, edited 0 time in total.
User avatar
OneLess
 
Posts: 158
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 5:10 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Eps » Mon Jan 07, 2008 1:05 am UTC

Last I heard was they found it to be .8c +-.2c or something of that order.


Wiki or Google for more on this. The short answer is that the study you're referring to is somewhat controversial and its results have not been widely accepted, particularly when a more accurate figure (approximately equal to c plus or minus about 0.5%) has been obtained via long-term measurements of PSR 1913+16 in its binary pulsar system. Disclaimer: This is outside my subfield.
User avatar
Eps
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:07 pm UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Herman » Mon Jan 07, 2008 6:09 am UTC

Inspired by the "Certainty" thread:

Quantum mechanics works for macroscopic ("everyday") stuff too. In fact it makes more accurate predictions than classical mechanics. We use classical mechanics because it's a good approximation and the math is easier. There is no sharply defined "quantum realm." The border between quantum and macroscopic phenomena is a convenient fiction and is subject to context, like the border between physics and chemistry.
Herman
 
Posts: 559
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 2:46 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Peripatetic » Mon Jan 07, 2008 8:42 am UTC

Eps wrote:
Last I heard was they found it to be .8c +-.2c or something of that order.
Wiki or Google for more on this. The short answer is that the study you're referring to is somewhat controversial and its results have not been widely accepted, particularly when a more accurate figure (approximately equal to c plus or minus about 0.5%) has been obtained via long-term measurements of PSR 1913+16 in its binary pulsar system. Disclaimer: This is outside my subfield.

That binary star system has tested a lot of predictions of General Relativity (time dilation, space curvature, gravity radiation, etc.), but no one has unambiguously measured the speed of a gravity wave. GR predicts these travel at c, and experimental confirmation of just about every other aspect of GR makes this very likely, but we're not there yet. I think LIGO should go a long ways towards this goal.
User avatar
Peripatetic
 
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:47 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Rook » Mon Jan 07, 2008 9:32 pm UTC

HYPERiON wrote:
Durandal wrote:I've never understood why exactly an airplane would take off on a treadmill... I mean, it's not the airplane moving fast in relation to the ground that allows the wings to displace a sufficient amount of air, but the airplane moving fast in relation to the surrounding atmosphere...

Please don't start this again. Read this thread.

So to make it clear (which is the supposed point of this thread): conventional airplanes can take off from a treadmill.



Right? If that's not what you mean, I'll edit it back, but I think that's right.

It's just one of those annoying common sense brain teasers, like that bitchy maths one about 'the missing penny'. F***ing hate them.
You scratch my lion, and I'll scratch yours.

mattmacf wrote:Action precedes motivation.

This is very, very important.
User avatar
Rook
 
Posts: 179
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 1:55 pm UTC
Location: The Madness Place

Re: Common Questions

Postby Peripatetic » Wed Jan 09, 2008 3:25 am UTC

Meteorswarm wrote:Gravity travels at the speed of light, 299792458 meters/second. This has been closely validated with an experiment, but it mostly comes from theory since it isn't easy to measure.


Just to clarify, the results referred to by Eps assume General Relativity to be true (a safe assumption to be sure) and use other observations in calculating the speed of gravity. No one has measured the speed of gravity directly, independently of any theory. This is different than meaurements of the speed of light (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_l ... d_of_light), which are direct and do not rely upon any theory.
User avatar
Peripatetic
 
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:47 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby LoopQuantumGravity » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:37 am UTC

Peripatetic wrote:
Meteorswarm wrote:Gravity travels at the speed of light, 299792458 meters/second. This has been closely validated with an experiment, but it mostly comes from theory since it isn't easy to measure.


Just to clarify, the results referred to by Eps assume General Relativity to be true (a safe assumption to be sure) and use other observations in calculating the speed of gravity. No one has measured the speed of gravity directly, independently of any theory. This is different than meaurements of the speed of light (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_l ... d_of_light), which are direct and do not rely upon any theory.


That's not really true. The measurements of the speed of light are very dependent on what your theory says about space and time! So those measurements are not entirely model independent (although they come from a class of models larger than SR).
I study theoretical physics & strings, and am a recipient of the prestigious Jayne Cobb Hero of Canton award.

And the science gets done and you make a neat gun
For the people who are still alive!
User avatar
LoopQuantumGravity
 
Posts: 416
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:19 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Eps » Wed Jan 09, 2008 11:22 pm UTC

I'd just like to point out that I had a "This is Not My Field" disclaimer. If you want to discuss experimental particle/nuclear physics, however: let's dance*.

On topic: Physics might in principle be able to predict everything, but in practice the other scientfic fields are absolutely necessary, and likely always will be unless you happen to have a unified field theory, a computer the size of a galactic supercluster and some really good code.



* - I like the Macarena. What? What?!
User avatar
Eps
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 9:07 pm UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Solt » Sun Jan 13, 2008 5:04 am UTC

There is no such thing as a perfectly rigid material and thus any conclusions you can draw from that assumption are false.
"Welding was faster, cheaper and, in theory,
produced a more reliable product. But sailors do
not float on theory, and the welded tankers had a
most annoying habit of splitting in two."
-J.W. Morris
User avatar
Solt
 
Posts: 1912
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2007 5:08 am UTC
Location: California

Re: Common Questions

Postby null » Sun Jan 13, 2008 11:10 pm UTC

Indon wrote:
UmbralRaptor wrote:
OneLess wrote:-(Conventional) airplanes cannot take off from a treadmill :)

From a conventional treadmill, anyway. A sufficiently large and strong one...

Except for Harrier Jets.


And V-22 Ospreys, F-35s etc etc...actually http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_VTOL_aircraft
User avatar
null
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Dec 26, 2007 3:14 pm UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby evilbeanfiend » Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:09 pm UTC

Eps wrote: Physics might in principle be able to predict everything, but in practice the other scientfic fields are absolutely necessary, and likely always will be unless you happen to have a unified field theory, a computer the size of a galactic supercluster and some really good code.


well that is just because different scientific fields are a somewhat arbitrary human categorisation. the universe just is, it doesn't care whether you are chemist a material scientist a physicist or even a lowly engineer.
in ur beanz makin u eveel
User avatar
evilbeanfiend
 
Posts: 2650
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 7:05 am UTC
Location: the old world

Re: Common Questions

Postby eternauta3k » Thu Jan 17, 2008 12:29 am UTC

evilbeanfiend wrote:or even a lowly engineer.
Oh me yarm! Take that back!
Free-falling objects experience the same acceleration no matter their mass.
VectorZero wrote:It takes a real man to impact his own radius

That's right, slash your emo-wrists and spill all your emo-globin
User avatar
eternauta3k
 
Posts: 513
Joined: Thu May 10, 2007 12:19 am UTC
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Re: Common Questions

Postby Fat Tony » Thu Jan 17, 2008 12:58 am UTC

The answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything is 42.
The question coresponding with the answer to the ultimate question of life, the univer, and everything is, "What do you get when you multiply six by nine?"
And yes, six times nine is 42 in base 13.
Wanna hear the truth? Life is downright ok.
User avatar
Fat Tony
 
Posts: 1501
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:12 pm UTC
Location: South Italy

Re: Common Questions

Postby Tchebu » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:00 am UTC

Free-falling objects experience the same acceleration no matter their mass.


Neglecting air friction.

Just to be perfectly correct...
Our universe is most certainly unique... it's the only one that string theory doesn't describe.
Tchebu
 
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:42 am UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Common Questions

Postby Fat Tony » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:13 am UTC

Tchebu wrote:
Free-falling objects experience the same acceleration no matter their mass.


Neglecting air friction.

Just to be perfectly correct...

I've never understood this. Is it because the extra inertia an object has due to having more mass cancels out the increased pull of gravity?
Wanna hear the truth? Life is downright ok.
User avatar
Fat Tony
 
Posts: 1501
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:12 pm UTC
Location: South Italy

Re: Common Questions

Postby Sir_Elderberry » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:16 am UTC

Fat Tony wrote:
Tchebu wrote:
Free-falling objects experience the same acceleration no matter their mass.


Neglecting air friction.

Just to be perfectly correct...

I've never understood this. Is it because the extra inertia an object has due to having more mass cancels out the increased pull of gravity?


Exactly so. The gravitational force is proportional to mass.

Weight = Mass * G (on earth, 9.8m/s2)
Acceleration = Force/mass
A = (GM) / (M)
A = G.
http://www.geekyhumanist.blogspot.com -- Science and the Concerned Voter
Belial wrote:You are the coolest guy that ever cooled.

I reiterate. Coolest. Guy.

Well. You heard him.
User avatar
Sir_Elderberry
 
Posts: 4207
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:50 pm UTC
Location: Sector ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha

Re: Common Questions

Postby RockoTDF » Thu Jan 17, 2008 2:48 am UTC

1. "Datum" is the singular form of "Data." Not "Anecdotal Evidence."

2. Psychology is a science. Psychoanalysis and therapy are not. There is a difference between a research psychologist and a shrink. They have different degrees.

3. Your subjective experience of life is not adequate to explain behavior. Just like any other science, the behavioral and cognitive sciences require training before you can figure something out. See #1.

4. Any forum is a horrible sample of the general population for just about anything you could imagine. See #1.
Just because it is not physics doesn't mean it is not science.
http://www.iomalfunction.blogspot.com <---- A collection of humorous one liners and science jokes.
User avatar
RockoTDF
 
Posts: 582
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 6:08 am UTC
Location: Tucson, AZ, US

Re: Common Questions

Postby dosboot » Fri Jan 18, 2008 2:28 am UTC

Am I missing something? The thread about a plane on a treadmill did not reach a consensus.
dosboot
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2007 5:26 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby Tchebu » Fri Jan 18, 2008 5:42 am UTC

Yes it did, the consensus was that there are two ways of intepreting it. Either the treadmill moves at the speed of the wheel which is physically impossible, or it it equal to the speed that the plane would have been going if it were on solid ground and then the plane takes off notmally with the wheels spinning twice as fast as they normally would have on solid ground, which is what has been said earlier.
Our universe is most certainly unique... it's the only one that string theory doesn't describe.
Tchebu
 
Posts: 528
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2007 12:42 am UTC
Location: Montreal

Re: Common Questions

Postby tendays » Fri Jan 18, 2008 11:18 am UTC

People wrote:stuff about planes and threadmills


Image

(Stolen from the thedailywtf.com fora, where it was probably stolen from somewhere else)
<Will> s/hate/love/
Hammer wrote:We are only mildly modly. :D
Beware of the shrolymerase!
User avatar
tendays
 
Posts: 957
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 6:21 pm UTC
Location: HCMC

Re: Common Questions

Postby hyperion » Fri Jan 18, 2008 1:43 pm UTC

tendays wrote:(Stolen from the thedailywtf.com fora, where it was probably stolen from somewhere else)

That's pretty much the internet-wide standard for *facepalm.jpg*
Peshmerga wrote:A blow job would probably get you a LOT of cheeseburgers.
But I digress.
User avatar
hyperion
"I'll show ye...."
 
Posts: 1569
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 2:16 pm UTC
Location: Perth

Re: Common Questions

Postby genewitch » Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:19 pm UTC

To say that mythbusters can't set up the treadmill scenario SMACKS of WOO <--link to how WOOs operate!

In fact, all the arguments about the stupid treadmill thing reek of WOOness.

It's like saying that a dowser can't perform dowsing when it's being accurately and scientifically judged (or psychics, or astrologers, or homeopaths, or mercury-autism linkers). I know that the episode won't put the argument to bed. Because it's a thing of faith, at this point. that's why it's irrelevant to post "there was a consensus reached" or "It is most certainly THIS ANSWER"; because it isn't. One side screams and calls people names, the other side says "you're not understanding all the principles: here's X and Y reason"; to which the other side goes "you're stupid, any idiot can see Z proves you wrong".

anytime you have to back up your theories with insults, being mean, or other general asshat moves, you should probably rethink your approach to life.
...C is for people who would rather sit at home and match up pairs of socks by the count of their elastic bands, than to just get dressed with mismatched shoes and take the lady out to dinner and nail her in the car on the way home -xkcd_n00bz
MyMusic
User avatar
genewitch
 
Posts: 298
Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 2:28 am UTC

Re: Common Questions

Postby gmalivuk » Mon Jan 21, 2008 7:47 am UTC

Meteorswarm wrote:Look, as entertaining as the airplane-on-a-treadmill situation may be, this is really not the place for discussing it

And yet there you go, bringing it up again.

Further mention of the airplane-on-a-treadmill in this thread will be deleted.
If this post has math that doesn't work for you, use TeX the World for Firefox or Chrome

(cis male/he/him/his)
User avatar
gmalivuk
A debonaire peeing style
 
Posts: 22663
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 6:02 pm UTC
Location: Here and There

Re: Common Questions

Postby Generic Goon » Mon Jan 28, 2008 1:06 am UTC

Not only does matter not travel faster than light, neither does information. No matter how hard you spin those entangled photons.


While I am not sure whether it qualifies as information, I do believe that a wave function collapses instantaneously after an observation, as well as all wave functions entangled with the particle.
Generic Goon
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2008 5:20 pm UTC

Next

Return to Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Sizik and 8 guests