Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

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Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Shakleton » Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:07 pm UTC

Hey guys!

First a little bit of backstory:
I've had the luck that my life will somehow always bound to Ireland. There is no way to discribe the relationship between Ireland and me other than: I love Ireland. And I think Ireland loves me. We are THIS close. *crosses his fingers*
I somehow get calm, relaxed and happy when thinking of Ireland. It makes me happy. I have spent 4 Months in Cork, Ireland last year which were in retroperspective some very great months.

And now I am about to make a big mistake. I want to learn Irish!
It's such a beautiful language which awesome sound. I love the language. And I want to speak it. I think I have something of a talent for languages.
I already speak German (obviously), English (very fluent, maybe not as good as you but it still is foreign to me oO), French (not so good) and Spanish (Starting with that, ending the first year. Spanish is fun!) and now want to learn this language.

If anyone wants to fuss at me about dying languages, think of millions of students torturing themselves with latin each year.

Is there anyone here sharing my opinions? Anyone who already speaks that godlike language? (I need a mentor!)

So, discuss everybody. Please excuse me posting a thread under this topic without any Irish in it but I don't speak any yet.


Thanks

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby ZLVT » Thu Jun 12, 2008 1:58 am UTC

And I repeat, if you start a langugae thread, could you please post it in the language introduction thread so I can make a link.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Dream » Thu Jun 12, 2008 11:55 am UTC

Everyone on the forums who's Irish probably learned it at school. I can think of four or five Irish people off the top of my head, probably more. However, you must understand: The Irish language curriculum is RUBBISH, so none of us can speak it based on school learning. What you want is someone who's summers were spent in the Gaeltacht, which is like a child holding-pattern for parents who want their sex lives back, or just to have a holiday without the kids. And you speak Irish there. And if you're unlucky like some of my friends, you spend three weeks worrying that you're actually in an IRA training camp. (Not a joke. But hilarious :) )

Eye-Ron-ee-caley, my summers were spent in a German language camp, so I can't help you. But hopefully someone here can.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby well_hung_man » Fri Jun 13, 2008 9:50 pm UTC

Everyone on the forums who's Irish probably learned it at school. I can think of four or five Irish people off the top of my head, probably more. However, you must understand: The Irish language curriculum is RUBBISH, so none of us can speak it based on school learning. What you want is someone who's summers were spent in the Gaeltacht, which is like a child holding-pattern for parents who want their sex lives back, or just to have a holiday without the kids. And you speak Irish there. And if you're unlucky like some of my friends, you spend three weeks worrying that you're actually in an IRA training camp. (Not a joke. But hilarious :) )



Its so odd that i stumbles across this forum when i did..
coincidently, i am exactly one of theese aformentioned irish speakers.As was said, the irish course givis you nothing but an urge to take your own life, and is just so poor words cannot describe it. The sorry fact is that the current irish speaking revival in ireland is being spearheaded by an american comedian(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeAzetE74L4........this is him doing 'jump around' by house of pain in irish...He is passioate about irish and he spent a year in the gaelteach learning it, to prove to the people of ireland that is is both easy and fun...he made it into a documenntry, which was pretty big news in ireland at the time...it would be good for you to find if you can....here's his web site, its might be inspireing or something :http://www.desbishop.com/ there seems to be an irish course on it aswell). its a running joke in ireland that u learn absolutely nothing in irish except the 3 or 4 pointless phrases, and a couple of 8 page essays and summeries that u cough up on the days of your final exams :P.

this is the jolly peice of light reading that every irish human being has to basically memorise:
http://www.amazon.com/Old-Womans-Reflec ... 364&sr=8-2
you must note that u CAN absolutely judge this book by its cover. even thinking about this ferociously , mind blowingly awfull work erodes my sanity

Those summers in the gaelteach were something special tho..I am sure that they can never be replicated anywhere else in the world ever.. Most of the activities involve beating the englishness out of you, and informing you of your sins and so on..

I hope other irish ppl have not shared my experience of irish, which has been nothing less than torture

I am from cork too!!!!
cork native born and bred (/highfive)
i m sorry that i cant help with your passion for irish
best of luck!

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Moobly » Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:11 pm UTC

I grew up in Wexford until around middleschool when mum decided she wanted to live in states...go figure. Anyways I can completely concur. Learning gaelic as a boy was horrible. Even the instructor hated it. He'd sigh, pull out the text and say "Another day of Irish." Everyday same words. Come to think of it, he was just as bad as any of us. The only reason I carry ANY useful(and I use the term loosely) gaelic is my grandda insisting we practise at home.

And I loathe Peig Sayers. For the Americans that haven't read it, imagine a story written by the stereotypical old timers. Now imagine that story is very very long and very drawn out. Unecessarily so. The Irish equivalent of something like, "uphill, both ways, snow to the knees, shoeless; but I was lucky, the neighbor kid didn't even have feet. He still walked it with us though. And he carried his midget brother on his back, in a sack made of potato skins sewen together with dead coyote hair. A penny bought a week's worth of food but the family only made 2 cents a year." throw some death and labour in there and you've about got it. I promise, my eyes bled for weeks.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby starn » Sun Jun 29, 2008 3:11 pm UTC

"le bhur dtoil" if you're talking to more than one person.

I've just finished (escaped?) fourteen years of learning Irish. I, unlike many, quite like the language but I've been really lucky in terms of the people who've taught it to me, it seems. It's an insane language at the best of times, but it can be quite rewarding.

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby KingLoser » Wed Aug 20, 2008 12:47 am UTC

Dia dhuit - Hello (lit. God be with you) DEE-a GWIT
Dia's Muire dhuit - (reply to) Hello (lit. God and Mary with you) DEE-a iSS MWIRR-a Gwit
Fáilte - Welcome foyle-cha
Sláinte / Slán go fhoil - Goodbye / Until next time slawn-cha / slawn go fole
Conas atá tú? - How are you? cun-as a-taw too
Cad is ainm dhuit? - What's your name? COD iss ANNim ditch?
Ca bhfuil tú i do chonaí - Where do you live? caw vu-ill too i (this is a hard one to describe. think of it like the i in "it", but without the t...) duh coney
Go raibh (míle) maith agat. - Thank you (very much) GUH REV (mee-la) MAH ug-ut

I know this thread is old, but I wanted there to be at least some Irish in here.... :) I can't think of anything more to write, but just ask if you want anything.
Last edited by KingLoser on Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:51 pm UTC, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby aetherson » Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:28 pm UTC

Soooo are there examples of people pronouncing the above words?
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby KingLoser » Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:52 pm UTC

I added in the ways to pronounce them at the end... but I'm no means a language expert... hope it helps somewhat!

Oh yeah, and just to make things all the more confusing, I have Munster dialect, which means a syrupy thick bloody accent..
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Encarnacion » Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:05 pm UTC

KingLoser wrote:Dia dhuit - Hello (lit. God be with you) DEE-a GWIT
Dia's Muire dhuit - (reply to) Hello (lit. God and Mary with you) DEE-a iSS MWIRR-a Gwit
Fáilte - Welcome foyle-cha
Sláinte / Slán go fhoil - Goodbye / Until next time slawn-cha / slawn go fole
Conas atá tú? - How are you? cun-as a-taw too
Cad is ainm dhuit? - What's your name? COD iss ANNim ditch?
Ca bhfuil tú i do chonaí - Where do you live? caw vu-ill too i (this is a hard one to describe. think of it like the i in "it", but without the t...) duh coney
Go raibh (míle) maith agat. - Thank you (very much) GUH REV (mee-la) MAH ug-ut

I know this thread is old, but I wanted there to be at least some Irish in here.... :) I can't think of anything more to write, but just ask if you want anything.



I had a goodfriend/roommate who is pretty much determined to live in Northern Ireland, and she knows the above phrases and then some, and even taught them to me. Trouble is, she was Hard-Of-Hearing, now is Deaf, so her pronunciations of these phrases may vary from how they are in Ireland. For example, for the last one we used "Gor-ra MY agut". It was fun to greet my Irish aunt in Irish Gaelic and have her be all confused, though. Learning the above phrases is worth it, at least for that kind of thing.

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby KingLoser » Wed Aug 27, 2008 5:43 am UTC

Encarnacion wrote:I had a goodfriend/roommate who is pretty much determined to live in Northern Ireland, and she knows the above phrases and then some, and even taught them to me. Trouble is, she was Hard-Of-Hearing, now is Deaf, so her pronunciations of these phrases may vary from how they are in Ireland. For example, for the last one we used "Gor-ra MY agut". It was fun to greet my Irish aunt in Irish Gaelic and have her be all confused, though. Learning the above phrases is worth it, at least for that kind of thing.


The dialect would be almost foreign in Ulster (North) to what I speak in Munster, so I can't say really if the pronunciation is right or wrong, it sounds good out loud though, and would definetly be understood to mean "thank you".

Irish speakers arn't really big into the rules to be honest.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby davef » Thu Aug 28, 2008 4:39 pm UTC

"Gorra-MAI-agut" or "gorra-MY-agut" sound pretty accurate as far as Northern pronunciation goes.

The '-bh' in 'raibh' can be pronounced as a 'v', a 'w' or a 'b', depending on where you hear it, so it can sound like REV, ROW or RAB/REB.

And, literally translated, (as far as I can tell) it means 'That you would/will be well', or 'That you would/will have goodness'. Beautiful, isn't it?

Incidentally, there is also a word for 'thanks' or 'appreciation' (as in: 'to give thanks to') which is 'buíochas' (BWEE-cas or BWEE-o-cas), though it's more formal than 'Thank you' and not used as often.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby aetherson » Tue Nov 04, 2008 8:44 pm UTC

resurrecting this thread...

So I recently saw a couple of, what I think are, Welsh/ Gaelic names.
Llewyn
Llewelyn

How do you pronounce these names?
Like Erin (for the first one) maybe?
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby BobMacDhonnchaidh » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:04 pm UTC

Can't speak for Irish Gaelic, but I've tried learning Scottish Gaelic, which is almost the same language, and a gorgeous language for music :D

Can't say I got very far with it, there aren't exactly many opportunities to practice it, and it's such an alien language that I doubt I could ever become fully fluent in it.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby KingLoser » Tue Nov 04, 2008 9:09 pm UTC

aetherson wrote:resurrecting this thread...

So I recently saw a couple of, what I think are, Welsh/ Gaelic names.
Llewyn
Llewelyn

How do you pronounce these names?
Like Erin (for the first one) maybe?

These are Welsh, and I'm not much use with Welsh pronunciation.. Probably comes from the Old Irish name Lugh (which is pronounced almost like 'Lew').

BobMacDhonnchaidh wrote:Can't speak for Irish Gaelic, but I've tried learning Scottish Gaelic, which is almost the same language, and a gorgeous language for music :D

I love Scottish Gaelic, I can't speak it, but have had a chance to discuss the similarities with a speaker. Understanding each other is easy enough.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby aetherson » Wed Nov 05, 2008 12:53 am UTC

hmmmm
maybe like Lu-anne?
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby BobMacDhonnchaidh » Wed Nov 05, 2008 1:21 am UTC

Llewelyn's normally pronounced "Lew-ell-in" by English speakers.

"Ll" is a strange one in Welsh, I've heard places like Llanelli pronounced "Klan-eth-lee" with a "ch" sound at the start like in "loch," but I've also read that this pronunciation is wrong and that the "ll" combination in Welsh is a strange sound that I'm not sure how to describe :lol:

I'd imagine a Welsh speaker would have a more useful opinion than mine on the subject. :P
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby aetherson » Wed Nov 05, 2008 4:23 pm UTC

Ah. Thanks.
Turns out Llewyn is pronounced "Lee-win" with emphasis on the "Lee"...at least by this person.
As a caveat though...we are on the other side of the pond...
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby goofy » Thu Nov 06, 2008 1:33 am UTC

BobMacDhonnchaidh wrote:Llewelyn's normally pronounced "Lew-ell-in" by English speakers.

"Ll" is a strange one in Welsh, I've heard places like Llanelli pronounced "Klan-eth-lee" with a "ch" sound at the start like in "loch," but I've also read that this pronunciation is wrong and that the "ll" combination in Welsh is a strange sound that I'm not sure how to describe :lol:


It's a voiceless alveolar lateral fricative /ɬ/. It's like /l/ but with more force so some turbulence is present. To me it sounds like /kl/, but it isn't.

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Cryopyre » Sat Nov 08, 2008 12:10 am UTC

This is worth taking a hilarious look at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo96H1-POY8
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby KingLoser » Sat Nov 08, 2008 1:00 am UTC

Does the bride come with.... potatoes? Nice, since we're on a video buzz, this is an American comedian who learned the language in a year. He's talking about "an modh coinníollach" which is the conditional tense, and one of the hardest aspects of the language to learn. But yeah, he learned it in a year, the whole language, what a legend.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby BobMacDhonnchaidh » Sat Nov 08, 2008 2:24 am UTC

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Vikingr » Sun Dec 21, 2008 1:56 pm UTC

Pfft, modh coinníolach is easy! And don't let aul Des tell you otherwise. :D

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Leftmost Cat » Wed Dec 24, 2008 8:20 am UTC

Nach ait é nach bhfuil aon Gaeilge ann sa snáithe seo?

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby onion » Thu May 14, 2009 5:23 am UTC

Hi.

I am fortunate enough to have parents that have a sense of who they are in the world.
As an Irish couple they sent me to a Gael Scoil when it was time for me to start my education.
I am forever thankful to them that i was able to spend 6 hours a day communicating through our language in such a way that i was fluent in my native tongue by the age of 10.
I am now 25, a qualified pilot and my education was extremely comprehensive but i have a major regret. As a 12yo leaving primary school to enter the big bad world of second level education i was offered no choice but to enroll in an English based secondary school.
Don't get me wrong, i loved my time at St. Macartan's and at the time reveled in the change. No more looking over my shoulder before speaking English in the playground!
But it is now when i have entered my career and can appreciate the opportunities afforded to me by others that i regret not having the choice to continue my education through Irish. I think i speak for the majority of my primary school class when i say that.
It is a real shame that our language cannot survive due to sheer lack of interest.
At a time when England was ruled from Rome it was Irish/Gaelic that was spoken on this great Island. And yet today we gladly speak the language of our former colonial masters.
I ask nothing but this, Parents if you can, enroll your child in an Irish speaking school. And don't feel ashamed when they at the age of 6 can return home from school and have a conversation with someone through their native language. Be proud and use it as encouragement for you yourself to get to grips with one of Europe's oldest languages. It may not be a working language but it is only through us that this ancient language will either survive and flourish or unfortunately die.

Slan mo chara!

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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby Kewangji » Mon May 18, 2009 2:31 pm UTC

Why do you have to be proud of where you come from?
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby BobMacDhonnchaidh » Mon May 18, 2009 10:13 pm UTC

Kewangji wrote:Why do you have to be proud of where you come from?


No one said you have to be.
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Re: Gaeilge le do thoil! (Irish practise)

Postby dubhghaillix » Tue Oct 06, 2009 10:37 pm UTC

BobMacDhonnchaidh wrote:
Kewangji wrote:Why do you have to be proud of where you come from?


No one said you have to be.


Better Question: Can you be proud of where you come from? I'm mean, it's not like ya have a choice into what society you're born into. It's kinda like that comic. http://www.xkcd.com/588/ huh, actually, it's pretty much exactly like that.

Ceist i bhfád níos fearr: An feidir leat a bheith brodúil as do cheantar duachais? Toisc nach bhfuil rogha agat ar an sochaí ina rugadh thú. Tá sé mar an ceanna leis an coimic sin (níl mé chun é a phoistáil faoi dhó sa phost ceanna, clicigí ar an naisc sa leagan bearla, ya bhancer leiscúil :P) hmm, nuair a smaoineann tú air tá sé díreach mar an ceanna.

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