Food fleeting thoughts

Apparently, people like to eat.

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PAstrychef
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:08 am UTC

There’s also the matter of scale-making a gross of muffins is a bit different from making a dozen.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby poxic » Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:09 am UTC

144 of anything would be a lot to eat by oneself.

Well, except maybe rice or cornflakes.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:15 am UTC

I worked at cookies by design for almost four years. It was my first Real Job when i turned 14.

I eventually did everything but baking, as i wasnt allowed to opperate ovens at that age.

But i sure do wish i knew their spice cookie recipe. I know its probably a secret n all that but id sure be making them for myself lol. So. Good.

Someone posted what is basically their sugar cookie recipe (apparently) on the internet. So the recipes cant be too secret or that wouldve been shut down. But i never liked those as much. Just sweet and no flavour. But the spice cookie...

Sigh. I do miss the free cookies on saturday. Closed sunday so we got to take all the cookies home hehe.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:12 pm UTC

Make a spice blend you like.
Make sugar cookie mix.
Add spice blend.
Spice cookies!
Free cookies are a good thing.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:34 pm UTC

PAstrychef wrote:Make a spice blend you like.
Make sugar cookie mix.
Add spice blend.
Spice cookies!
Free cookies are a good thing.

Well thats part problem, ive never found a sugar cookie recipe ive liked
If i look up spice cookie its all gingerbred and i really hate molasas and similar flavours.
I have no clue where id start.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Moo » Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:46 am UTC

Have you ever had Dutch speculaas? It's probably not at all what you're referring to, as I know American cookies are usually soft and chewy and these are crisp, but they are very yum.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Wed Feb 27, 2019 5:57 pm UTC

Moo wrote:Have you ever had Dutch speculaas? It's probably not at all what you're referring to, as I know American cookies are usually soft and chewy and these are crisp, but they are very yum.

Not that brand, but Lotus Biscoff yes, which the internet tells me are basically the same thing.
lotus faq wrote:WHAT IS SPECULOOS OR SPECULAAS?
Speculoos is the generic name of the traditional crispy, spice cookies from Belgium. Speculaas is the name given to the same type of cookies in Holland. Lotus Biscoff Cookies are Speculoos or Speculaas cookies.

They're good with tea. But def a biscuit not a cookie. I'd fail at great british baking show, i'd be making all the soft moist cookies and traybakes and totally off the first day. I remember their American Pie challenge, and paul hated like, every single pie. Well paul, I disagree with you. Our pies are amazing. And for biscuits I think I'd make proper Biscuits and Gravy, just to piss them off and introduce them to some fine southern culture baking :P
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Zohar » Wed Feb 27, 2019 6:54 pm UTC

I'm confused because it sounds like you're referring to biscuits in two different ways in the same paragraph. I thought American biscuits were those fluffy sorta-buns that you'd have with, yes, biscuits and gravy. But I think of speculoos as a cookie/British biscuit.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Thu Feb 28, 2019 1:40 am UTC

I did. Speculoos (lotus) are a biscuit (british), and certainly not a cookie (american). They are actually called biscuits (as in british biscuit) here.

Then i made a joke that id be kicked off GBB because Id making soft fluffy biscuits (american) instead of hard biscuits (british), just to be goofy and get under paul hollywoods skin. I wanna see the face he would make. Hehe.

Its like...the one place chips in america are chips (british) are when you order fish n chips. Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).

Isnt lanaguage fun?
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Quercus » Thu Feb 28, 2019 10:38 am UTC

Sungura wrote:Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).


Do you get British chips (thick cut) or fries (thin cut)?

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sableagle » Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:02 am UTC

Turns out Nepal is a great place for vegetarian food.

They have dhal bat (ignore the "h" and make both "a"s long), which is lentils and rice and veg curry and more lentils and more rice and more veg curry, veg. thali (prononced "tally" as in counting), which is kinda similar but spinach and veg curry and curried veg and pickle and rice and a popad and more spinach and more rice and more veg curry and more curried veg, and this weird stuff made of buckwheat flour and chickpeas that's served in a very similar way:

Image

It's kind of like "nutrient paste" from science fiction, but stiff and dense. I finished mine alright, mixing spoonfuls of it with the tastier other things, but one of the younger guys who normally polished off everyone else's food gave two big lumps of his paste to the local stray dogs.

The dhal bat and thali, though? Heck yeah. Found a place just across the main road from Kathmandu's airport where decent veg thali and sweet masala tea cost me 260 rupees aka about $2.50 US, and in Pokhara we got veg thali for 220 rupees each in a little café with "OPEN" painted on the door and a friendly grandmotherly type running it. Stuff was spicy but it was good! Sharmila, here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pokha ... 83.9955879 ... but actually next to Holy Momo, not where that placemarker is.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Zohar » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:23 pm UTC

Thali is actually the name of the plate. Anyway I haven't gone to a Nepalese restaurant I think, but there's lots of food in that region that's fantastic for vegetarians, yes.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby Sungura » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:26 pm UTC

Quercus wrote:
Sungura wrote:Order fish n chips in America you get british chips (aka fries). Otherwise, chips in america are crunchy (british crisp).


Do you get British chips (thick cut) or fries (thin cut)?

Thick cut / british - what we would further define as wedges.
Eg all variatnts are fries here:
Steak fry - the thin cut sticks (see steak n shake fries)
Wedges - british style (i think burger king fries count here, but also yes any fry from a chippie there in uk)
Waffle - shaped as sounds (see chickfila fries)
Crinkle - thick but with waves (like wavy lays)
Curly - in spirals! (See arbys fries)

Majority of fries lay between steak and wedge and have no further defining word i know of; id include mcdonalds, wendy, and the vast majority of fries here.

Fuck now i want to go back to that chippie on the barbican i like. Grrr. Meh its only 16+ hours of travel, right?

We also have pasties here. Well. In Michigan we did. Cornish miners brought them back in mining days. Rutebega is used instead because we have it here. Otherwise, same as a traditional cornish pasty. I remember my brit friends being shocked i knew what a pasty was, and what was in it, and had them before.i will add those prima pasties are so good fresh, though!
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby dubsola » Tue Mar 05, 2019 4:55 am UTC

Sableagle wrote:Turns out Nepal is a great place for vegetarian food.

It sure is. Nepali Dal Bhat is the one food from a country I've travelled in where I just never ever got tired of it. Unlike dal in India, it's not spicy.

I loved seeing all the different variations from each tea house / restaurant to the next. I loved the fact that you can have as much as you like - just ask for more. It's the culture.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby natraj » Tue Mar 05, 2019 2:17 pm UTC

there's about seventeen thousand different kinds of dals in india and only some of them are spicy though?? saying dal is spicy is as utterly ludicrous a statement as saying that soup is spicy.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby dubsola » Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:11 am UTC

Woops. You're right, of course. I was thinking about the most commonly found dal in "Indian" (ie Rajasthani) restaurants in Western countries. Even then they all have their own recipe. Same in Nepal actually. While it's all pretty much soup, there's a difference from one tea house / restaurant to the next. But I think it's fair to say that in general Nepali dal bhat has less spice, especially chilli, than say a Rajasthani dal bhat.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby flicky1991 » Sun Apr 07, 2019 11:44 pm UTC

Had this delicious Thai pork rice bowl for lunch. Picture came out nice too.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby pogrmman » Mon Apr 22, 2019 5:51 pm UTC

As I’m sitting eating a bowl of grits for lunch, I can’t help but marvel at what a wonderful food source corn is. If I were religious, I’d say it’s truly more of a “gift from god” than any other grain is. I mean, the grains themselves are large, the plant is fairly easy to grow, it’s fairly high yielding, it is easy to process, it tastes really good. When you nixtamalize it and serve it with beans, that provides pretty much every nutrient you need. (And corn and beans grow well together.)

I mean, wheat is pretty cool and all: that gluten is absolutely magical stuff, but corn ticks off basically every box for a staple crop.

And to think that our best guess is that it was domesticated from teosinte is amazing! It’s stunning to me, but they’re quite close genetically.

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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby PAstrychef » Mon Apr 22, 2019 11:02 pm UTC

And all of those traits are the result of millennia of genetic modification. When planted with squash and beans it doesn’t ruin the soil the way it does when it’s monocropped. Nutritionally it isn’t bad, but it does need to be ground to make most nutrients accessible.
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Re: Food fleeting thoughts

Postby sardia » Tue Apr 23, 2019 5:26 am UTC

PAstrychef wrote:And all of those traits are the result of millennia of genetic modification. When planted with squash and beans it doesn’t ruin the soil the way it does when it’s monocropped. Nutritionally it isn’t bad, but it does need to be ground to make most nutrients accessible.

To add onto this, I wouldn't pick this as the crop of the future. It's tasty, but that's from decades of subsidy enabled food experimentation. There's a cool study looking into tasty,cheap, and easy to grow crops. It's usually a obscure crop that people sorta grow, but with no culinary history behind it.


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