Living in the Wild

Things that don't belong anywhere else. (Check first).

Moderators: Moderators General, Prelates, Magistrates

fynthase
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:16 am UTC

Living in the Wild

Postby fynthase » Sat May 22, 2010 2:11 am UTC

A friend and I are compelled this summer to live for a week or so in the wild. We're from New York and not at all cut out for this--basically looking for advice. Our preconditions are: we don't bring food, we don't bring water, we bring a lighter, tent, and a gun (oh, and the car would be parked a mile or so away lol).

Any thoughts on where we should go and how we should approach it

User avatar
poxic
Eloquently Prismatic
Posts: 4743
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 3:28 am UTC
Location: Left coast of Canada

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby poxic » Sat May 22, 2010 2:24 am UTC

Step one: read this.

Step two: hire a seasoned survivalist, or a group of them, to take you out for a week. Alternately, stay home where it's safe and you can get food and clean water, and just watch survivalist shows on TV.

ETA: I'm serious about the "go with seasoned survivalists" thing. A whole lot of inexperienced people who try what you want to do, end up dead.
Last edited by poxic on Sat May 22, 2010 3:14 am UTC, edited 2 times in total.
In everyone's life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.
- Albert Schweitzer, philosopher, physician, musician, Nobel laureate (14 Jan 1875-1965)

fynthase
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:16 am UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby fynthase » Sat May 22, 2010 2:50 am UTC

ironically enough that movie was our inspiration. fucking awesome movie btw

User avatar
justaman
Posts: 498
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:53 am UTC
Location: in ur walls eatin' ur internets

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby justaman » Sat May 22, 2010 5:37 am UTC

I would like to second Poxic's comment about getting some experience first.

It is very very common for inexperienced people to die in situations such as this. Usually the biggest problem is getting lost, unless you can read a topographic map (and use a compass) well and are used to hiking DO NOT DO IT! Even very experienced people get lost on occasion, the only reason they survive is that they know what to do... Do You? A week is a long time without food and lethal without water, what happens if you can't find any?

Also be aware that it movies always make it sound like the forests are full of food, really they are not. I would be surprised if you managed to track down and kill anything larger than a squirrel. Also it really pays to know what plants are poisonous, some berries may look and taste nice, such as nightshade, but are actually quite toxic, just becasue you see a bird or other animal eating them does not mean they are OK for you.
Felstaff wrote:"deglove"? I think you may have just conjured the sickest image within my mind since I heard the term "testicle pop".

User avatar
New User
Posts: 686
Joined: Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:40 am UTC
Location: USA

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby New User » Sat May 22, 2010 6:22 am UTC

If you have never even been camping before then I join the team of folks who say they recommend that you do not try this. A week really is lethal with no water. Water from streams and creeks could be contaminated with bacteria or chemicals, and you could get sick quickly, really sick, and be too weak to even walk the mile back to your car. Then you'd die. Also if desperation from hunger leads you to become willing to eat anything you see, you could just as easily eat something poisonous and become weak from sickness as well. Even if you don't die, you'll be completely miserable if you have a fever and diarrhea and no way back to civilization, and of course you'd still be hungry after you puke poison berries.

My advice: try camping for just a day or two. It's a lot of fun. Bring food, plenty of water, and equipment (other than water and ready-to-eat food and more water, I'd recommend at least sleeping bags or blankets if the weather is going to be nice i.e. not raining. A tent isn't necessary except to keep insects and animals off you while you sleep, and to keep you from rain). You should know that dehydration is a major hazard when spending time in the wilderness, so bring lots of water. You don't need to stay a long way from your vehicle, just a decently long way from civilation to have fun and get the wilderness experience. If you are too far from your vehicle/civilization and a member of your party gets hurt, your trip could go from fun time to disaster time really quick. Injuries can happen suddenly and unexpectedly to anyone, it could be as simple as blistered feet or a sprained ankle to as serious as heat stroke or a venomous snake bite. Do you know what to do if your friend has a heat stroke? Does he know what to do if you suffer heat stroke? Without immediate first aid and medical attention it causes permanent brain damage and death.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26428
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby SecondTalon » Sat May 22, 2010 6:58 am UTC

fynthase wrote:Our preconditions are: we don't bring food, we don't bring water, we bring a lighter, tent, and a gun (oh, and the car would be parked a mile or so away lol).

Any thoughts on where we should go and how we should approach it
Don't.

You're already fucking up hard. No food and no water? A gun? What the fuck!? What the hell are you going to do for food out there? Kill something and eat it? Ignoring that you made no mention of a knife nor have any knowledge of how to field dress (that's the polite way of saying gut) an animal, do you possess hunting licenses, permission to hunt on said land, and know what's in season for the week you're going?

No?

Hey, you're poaching!

So just let me know when you're going, and let me know the address to send the condolences flowers. If you leave on a Sunday, I'll send them on Thursday. Should be about right.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
PAstrychef
for all intimate metaphysical encounters
Posts: 3007
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 6:24 pm UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby PAstrychef » Sat May 22, 2010 4:54 pm UTC

Not only is it hard to find things to kill and eat in the woods, but plenty of times it's illegal. And making food from a dead animal is a lot harder than it looks in the movies. And carrying a gun? Are you planning on spending plenty of time at the range with moving targets? The folks who successfully hunt deer for meat often take several tries and have been doing it for years.
It's great that you want to try this-but it would be nicer if you tried and lived to use the knowledge/insights you earned from it.
Find a wilderness group-AYH often has cheap trips-and go camping with some folks who do know what to do if trouble strikes. Then make friends with someone who owns some land in the Berkshires and camp in their back 40 for a weekend, where they will know where you are and when you're supposed to be home.
There are lots of good books about this stuff-ask at a camping supplies store for current recommendations.
Getting intestinal bugs from bad water is NO FUN.
I'm not saying you should stay at home, just that some real-time experience will make your eventual trip much more enjoyable.
Don’t become a well-rounded person. Well rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish.

User avatar
LongLiveTheDutch
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 9:17 pm UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby LongLiveTheDutch » Sat May 22, 2010 7:58 pm UTC

Read this website in it's entirety.

If you want to "live in the wild", bring things you need to survive. Water, food, a knife, rope, hatchet, a small spade, fire making utensils, etc. If you want to be hard core, ditch the tent and the gun. Making your own shelter is fairly simple if you're in the woods, and a gun is essentially useless for your purposes, unless you're defending yourself from bears, in which case, bring a nice 12 gauge with slugs and/or buck shot.

Your initial post would see you severely hurting after a week.


p.s. A map/compass, or a GPS. However, batteries run out. Or, pull a Hanzel and Grettel and bring flagging tape and mark your way every forty feet back to your car. Just make sure to take it down when you come out.

fynthase
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 5:16 am UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby fynthase » Sun May 23, 2010 12:31 am UTC

Thanks a ton for all the advice.

Basically, we've come back down to earth and are going to do things way more half-assed now. Not sure exactly what we're going to do, but we will definitely bring food, water, most likely a tent...

The point of it really is to broaden our minds, though it sort of feels weird to say it in such explicit terms. So while it doesn't have to be dangerous there has to be a certain amount of fear, or else the experience will probably be pointless (unless it was in preparation for a more dramatic, less equipped endeavor).

User avatar
Fat Zombie
Posts: 588
Joined: Wed Jun 06, 2007 10:28 am UTC
Location: The comfy chair.

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby Fat Zombie » Sun May 23, 2010 12:54 am UTC

Broadening minds is over-rated. Go camping, but take a big-ass tent, camping stove, lots of food, all the conveniences. You can enjoy nature without being eaten by it (or poisoned by it, or torn limb from limb by it, or really you get the idea).
...And before you ask: yes, I do like to listen to myself talk!

User avatar
Enuja
Posts: 1576
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:40 pm UTC
Location: Chicago, IL
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby Enuja » Sun May 23, 2010 2:16 am UTC

I definitely like doing the wilderness simply: I don't like to carry big backpacks, I like to collect water from a stream and treat it, and I'll admit to having snagged and snacked on some smilax shoots while I'm walking in Florida. But, for me at least, the best way to do that is to have a base camp with food. You can very successfully and effectively broaden your mind by just hiking, without even carrying all of your food, much less trying to live off of the land. If you scare yourself, you're doing it wrong. Wanting to be in the wildnerness to scare yourself is like wanting to go to a ghetto or favela to scare yourself. It's stupid, dangerous, and most importantly, disrespectful. Jump off a diving board or sky dive or have spiders crawl over your arms or otherwise target your own fears if you're interested in scaring yourself. There is so much to appreciate in different types of wilderness, trying to heighten it by adding fear will swamp your powers of observation and leave you with a much less powerful experience.

If you'd like to do off-trail walking, first practice with an Orienteering Club (a quick Google search netted a Hudson Valley Orienteering Club), then practice hiking on trails and orienteering that way, then go, with food and water treatment equipment, to a trackless wilderness.
Last edited by Enuja on Sun May 23, 2010 3:08 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
arbivark
Posts: 531
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 5:29 am UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby arbivark » Sun May 23, 2010 2:48 am UTC

wait wait, greenbriar is edible and is related to sasparilla and for that matter smurfberries?
durn, i used to teach this stuff and didnt know that.

User avatar
pooteeweet
Posts: 288
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2008 10:56 am UTC
Location: small northeast hippy town

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby pooteeweet » Wed May 26, 2010 6:42 pm UTC

If you're as inexperienced as it sounds, I think regular old camping should be plenty of a "mind-broadening" experience-- no need to take things to potentially dangerous extremes. If you've never done it before (heck, even if you have), going for a few days without electricity, figuring out how to light and cook over a campfire, shitting in the woods, etc are all going to be challenging and novel experiences. There's no reason to jump straight into hard-core survivalist stuff. Hell, you should probably go to a campground first, with outhouses and adirondack shelters and all, to ease yourself into things.

User avatar
tastelikecoke
Posts: 1208
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:58 am UTC
Location: Antipode of Brazil
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby tastelikecoke » Sat May 29, 2010 3:51 pm UTC

camping is very fun.

camping without electricity is not very fun.

camping without anything is very not very fun.

I recommend beaches. The sea cucumbers and the jellyfishes recommended for better experience.
Last edited by tastelikecoke on Sun May 30, 2010 5:10 am UTC, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
scruff
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:16 am UTC
Location: vitriol
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby scruff » Sat May 29, 2010 4:16 pm UTC

I would recommend getting in touch with someone from Hawk Circle (http://www.hawkcircle.com/index.htm) and asking them where you can get some survival training between then and now before you go off and try to do it with zero experience. Food is going to be the biggest sticker, because there are typically complex laws surrounding the issue of hunting/fishing/trapping, and even if you comply with all of those laws they are among the most difficult of skills to practice. Water, fire and shelter will be less of an issue. If you have a good water filter you'll be set with a small stream, and you can put together a survival shelter almost anywhere on your first day out while you still have lots of energy.

User avatar
suffer-cait
Yes, that's my perfectly normal house cat, why do you ask?
Posts: 2575
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2008 12:01 am UTC
Location: da aina
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby suffer-cait » Sat May 29, 2010 10:37 pm UTC

tastelikecoke wrote:camping is very fun.

camping without electricity is not very fun.

camping without anything is very not very fun.

I recommend beaches. The sea cucumbers and the jellyfishes recommended for better experience.
i argue that camping without electricity is more fun, camping without a gas stove even more so.
beaches are great though cause they have showers
ImageImageImageImageImage

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26428
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby SecondTalon » Sat May 29, 2010 11:34 pm UTC

Man, I'd argue that if you have electricity, you aren't camping.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
Dave_Wise
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:59 pm UTC
Location: Wales. Explaining much.
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby Dave_Wise » Sat May 29, 2010 11:44 pm UTC

Camping is awesome :)

Actually, I find it can be fun not having electricity for a while. I mean, I wouldn't want to do it every day, but you start to realise how we've come to think of electricity as a necessity, when it's anything but. Then, after the first week or so, you start to think of electricity as a kind of tyranny- because you're able to stay up later and be on the go all night, you have to. Without it, you start to notice things you probably haven't seen since you were a child, like subtle effects of light at dawn and dusk.
Towards the end of the second week, however, it started being a lot less fun. It's nice to have hot water whenever you want it, and I missed reading in bed. These problems can be solved, though. The second time around I worked out how to have a wash with a bucket and a kettle, and you can always take a torch.

The boy scouts know what they're about as regards this subject: be prepared. But the most important piece of kit you can bring is knowledge and experience. You'll enjoy it a lot more if you do some training sessions first, say over a few long weekends, bringing as much kit as you need and just practicing the techniques you will need when you leave the kit behind.
The future is always bright. Bombs generate quite substantial amounts of illumination
-a friend.

User avatar
tastelikecoke
Posts: 1208
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:58 am UTC
Location: Antipode of Brazil
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby tastelikecoke » Sun May 30, 2010 5:10 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Man, I'd argue that if you have electricity, you aren't camping.

Oh yeah, I was thinking of something else actually, it's not electricity.

camping on dusty soil is not very fun.

I hate dusty soils. and when they are wet they are called mud. And when it's windy it's called eyesore.

User avatar
z4lis
Posts: 767
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:59 pm UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby z4lis » Sun May 30, 2010 3:57 pm UTC

As far as "mind-broadening" experiences go, I do believe that just going out somewhere with all the necessities should do it. The first time I went camping, way out in the middle of nowhere, my mind was blown by the sheer darkness of night with no city lights within twenty miles. Lights don't penetrate it, nor do any but the most massive, roaring fires. It's certainly something I'll remember for awhile. We've done a good job killing dark in civilization!
What they (mathematicians) define as interesting depends on their particular field of study; mathematical anaylsts find pain and extreme confusion interesting, whereas geometers are interested in beauty.

User avatar
Dave_Wise
Posts: 698
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2010 7:59 pm UTC
Location: Wales. Explaining much.
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby Dave_Wise » Sun May 30, 2010 9:58 pm UTC

True. The other thing you notice is the sheer amount of time you have. Without television, the internet, etc. every hour is a huge expanse of time.
The future is always bright. Bombs generate quite substantial amounts of illumination
-a friend.

User avatar
SecondTalon
SexyTalon
Posts: 26428
Joined: Sat May 05, 2007 2:10 pm UTC
Location: Louisville, Kentucky, USA, Mars. HA!
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby SecondTalon » Mon May 31, 2010 5:24 am UTC

z4lis wrote:As far as "mind-broadening" experiences go, I do believe that just going out somewhere with all the necessities should do it. The first time I went camping, way out in the middle of nowhere, my mind was blown by the sheer darkness of night with no city lights within twenty miles. Lights don't penetrate it, nor do any but the most massive, roaring fires. It's certainly something I'll remember for awhile. We've done a good job killing dark in civilization!
Clear night in a field during a full moon? You can almost break out a book.

Actually, if it's one of those Large Print books, I can.
heuristically_alone wrote:I want to write a DnD campaign and play it by myself and DM it myself.
heuristically_alone wrote:I have been informed that this is called writing a book.

User avatar
suffer-cait
Yes, that's my perfectly normal house cat, why do you ask?
Posts: 2575
Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2008 12:01 am UTC
Location: da aina
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby suffer-cait » Mon May 31, 2010 9:03 am UTC

pish, old man, i can read an average print novel in moon light
ImageImageImageImageImage

magriayan
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:52 pm UTC
Location: London, UK
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby magriayan » Mon May 31, 2010 3:17 pm UTC

Waiting forward for the results of your challenge. If you manage to realize your plan me and my friend will try to repeat the journey. I also live in megalopolis and it would be a real adventure for me.

ikrase
Posts: 319
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 3:22 am UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby ikrase » Thu Jun 03, 2010 1:45 am UTC

The best way: Go camping several times. (I. E. Backpacking). Each time, ditch the things you did not use that are not needed for safety. If you do this while learning and applying field skills, your pack will be very light, and you will be safe.


What you were planning should not UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES WHATSOEVER , EVEN IN EMERGENCY be attempted without a communications device. Anything more than 2 days is enough to die for want of resupply.
[bibliography]XKVCBDOSLDMSD[/bibliography]

User avatar
Cleverbeans
Posts: 1378
Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 1:16 pm UTC

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby Cleverbeans » Thu Jun 03, 2010 3:52 am UTC

SecondTalon wrote:Clear night in a field during a full moon? You can almost break out a book.


No almost about it. I spent three weeks canoing the Churchill River system and didn't have trouble reading the entire Foundation series by moonlight.

As for the definition of camping, anything that includes AC-current electricity, an internal combustion engine, fossil fuels or a shelter you can't carry with your teeth for 10 miles isn't a camping, it's a spa.
"Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration." - Abraham Lincoln

User avatar
tastelikecoke
Posts: 1208
Joined: Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:58 am UTC
Location: Antipode of Brazil
Contact:

Re: Living in the Wild

Postby tastelikecoke » Thu Jun 03, 2010 9:37 am UTC

Yes, I am an awful camper.

And yes, I haven't camped yet, but we trekked. Our place is full of NPA, which is unlike your mountain lions, have guns and aren't afraid to steal money.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider] and 18 guests